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  • #11
    Ali was the first name that came to me as well.
    The Old LefHook and billeau2 like this.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by them_apples View Post

      just a personal opinion; I think the farther back you go chins in boxing were generally better. My reasoning is this, like basketball which has attracted more 7 fters based on the success of height in basketball not actually because there are more 7 fters around today (theres the same amount as there was in 1920) Boxing back in the day attracted tough guys. You didnt go into boxing if you werent tough. Didn't matter if you were a good athlete, 15 rounds is a long time to not get hit.

      i think even guys like Walker, Zale, Cerdan, Robinson and greb for example would probably be totally iron chinned by todays standards.



      I think an iron chin is something you either have - or you don't. Just like punching power. I don't see any evidence, that either changes over time.

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      • #13
        Those little guys who fought HWs. Like Barbados and ****. Got to be quite tough for that.
        The Old LefHook likes this.

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        • #14
          Marvin Hagler. He only suffered one knockdown his entire career and even then most watching believe it shouldn’t have even been counted as a knockdown.
          But the biggest test to his chin came from the hardest puncher of his era, Thomas “The Hitman” Hearns. He delivered a punch which gave Marvin Hagler the nastiest cut he ever received and for a moment appeared to actually stun him. But even then, Hagler soon shook it off and the punch actually cost Hearns a broken right hand! A real life example of “my face to your fist style” gone right.
          This all becomes less surprising when one learns that X-Ray scans revealed that Hagler had a tougher and more developed temporal muscles than the average person. So he was practically built to take a punch like a champ.
          Keleneki, just the facts and 2 others like this.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by them_apples View Post

            well if we rank it based off of who they got hit by and what weight class. Chuvalo comes to mind and mcall.

            lamotta and Hagler obviously showed insane durability, but they were always fighting guys similar in weight and size.

            if we look at chuvalo or even a guy like scrapiron Johnson, or even fighters that got knocked out, but started in weight classes much lower (chavez and duran) but showed immense durability even against oponents naturally much larger.

            ill go with the top hw chins tho

            Chuvalo, Foreman, Mccall. All of them took massive shots from big punchers and seemingly wouldn't go down or recovered quickly.

            I think qawi should get a mention, 5 ft 7 former lhw taking upper cuts from Foreman and while being stopped, not actually knocked out.

            just a personal opinion; I think the farther back you go chins in boxing were generally better. My reasoning is this, like basketball which has attracted more 7 fters based on the success of height in basketball not actually because there are more 7 fters around today (theres the same amount as there was in 1920) Boxing back in the day attracted tough guys. You didnt go into boxing if you werent tough. Didn't matter if you were a good athlete, 15 rounds is a long time to not get hit.

            i think even guys like Walker, Zale, Cerdan, Robinson and greb for example would probably be totally iron chinned by todays standards.



            It is the difference we see when we profile "fighter" versus "athlete."
            The Old LefHook likes this.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Bundana View Post

              I think an iron chin is something you either have - or you don't. Just like punching power. I don't see any evidence, that either changes over time.
              Liston used to work on his chin... I can't think of any other fighter that did so, I am sure there were many. The question being if it actually had any effect.

              IMO its a little of both: As a martial artist, the KO I practice for when striking someone is to the tip of the chin. This spot short circuits the brain by attacking the brain stem directly because the brain has nowhere to bounce... Its like hitting the spinal cord in the back with an open hand chop. In either case, the brain can't "ground" (for lack of a better term) the impact of the blow. I don't know how anyone could prepare, train to take these blows.

              The more common KO in boxing is concussive and the brain gets jogged hard against the sides of the skull. In theory if a guy has good facial, neck resistance to whiplash, he may be able to offset some of the intitial whipping motion of the brain in the skull.

              When one looks at a slo mo and sees the face literally shape itself as the fist connects... Most people are unaware that what starts the brain effect is your face moving and slamming into your stationary brain, which cracks into the side of your skull case, then gets whipped against the other side and wamo! If your neck and shoulders can limit the initial acceleration of your face/brain case into your face... you might take the shot better.

              Any volunteers to give it a go? LOL!
              The Old LefHook likes this.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Flickergrab98 View Post
                Marvin Hagler. He only suffered one knockdown his entire career and even then most watching believe it shouldn’t have even been counted as a knockdown.
                But the biggest test to his chin came from the hardest puncher of his era, Thomas “The Hitman” Hearns. He delivered a punch which gave Marvin Hagler the nastiest cut he ever received and for a moment appeared to actually stun him. But even then, Hagler soon shook it off and the punch actually cost Hearns a broken right hand! A real life example of “my face to your fist style” gone right.
                This all becomes less surprising when one learns that X-Ray scans revealed that Hagler had a tougher and more developed temporal muscles than the average person. So he was practically built to take a punch like a champ.
                Chavez had an unnaturally thick Skull when Xrayed as well... Makes sense doesn't it?
                Flickergrab98 likes this.

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                • #18
                  Chuvalo worked on his chin as well. He referred to it as strengthening his "collar."

                  I figure Clay was seldom being hit squarely. I see that Chuvalo was often hit squarely and survived it all. Hagler would be a strong contender as well, as would Marciano and the Atomic Bull.

                  Myself, I have to go with Chuvalo. He had practically no head movement. Even Hag had good head movement. Marciano and Chuvalo were the ones who took the full force of punches and kept on coming. McCall's head did not move much either.

                  I go with Chuvalo.
                  Willie Pep 229 and like this.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by billeau2 View Post

                    Liston used to work on his chin... I can't think of any other fighter that did so, I am sure there were many. The question being if it actually had any effect.

                    IMO its a little of both: As a martial artist, the KO I practice for when striking someone is to the tip of the chin. This spot short circuits the brain by attacking the brain stem directly because the brain has nowhere to bounce... Its like hitting the spinal cord in the back with an open hand chop. In either case, the brain can't "ground" (for lack of a better term) the impact of the blow. I don't know how anyone could prepare, train to take these blows.

                    The more common KO in boxing is concussive and the brain gets jogged hard against the sides of the skull. In theory if a guy has good facial, neck resistance to whiplash, he may be able to offset some of the intitial whipping motion of the brain in the skull.

                    When one looks at a slo mo and sees the face literally shape itself as the fist connects... Most people are unaware that what starts the brain effect is your face moving and slamming into your stationary brain, which cracks into the side of your skull case, then gets whipped against the other side and wamo! If your neck and shoulders can limit the initial acceleration of your face/brain case into your face... you might take the shot better.

                    Any volunteers to give it a go? LOL!
                    There are some youtube videos out there from about 5 years back with GGG doing his 'chin workout'. Additionally, I know of those who do neck work with this intent. The thought being a strong neck would prevent your head from snapping back so violently when hit, less chance for your brain to bounce around and get concussed.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Noelanthony View Post

                      I can give you an all time great that no one can deny, yet had a fragile chin for a heavyweight..... Lennox Lewis
                      He took some incoming from Vitalie lol.

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