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6ft9 280lb Fury destroys any old timer boxer

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  • 6ft9 280lb Fury destroys any old timer boxer

    Kronk Fury is a monster, as if a midget like Marciano or Louis could ever land a punch on him, let alone beat him.

    Size and skills matter, and no boxer throughout history has the physical attributes of Fury, this coupled with his iron will, heart & skillset makes him very close to being unbeatable.
    deowal likes this.

  • #2
    Originally posted by denium View Post
    Kronk Fury is a monster, as if a midget like Marciano or Louis could ever land a punch on him, let alone beat him.

    Size and skills matter, and no boxer throughout history has the physical attributes of Fury, this coupled with his iron will, heart & skillset makes him very close to being unbeatable.
    Old fighters were way rougher and tougher than fighters of today. They fought way more and were just hard, hard men. Joe Louis and Rocky Marciano hit WAY harder than Tyson Fury. WAY harder. These guys didn't fool around on social media or on the internet.

    Wilder dropped him on his ass twice dude.. Imagine if Louis or Marciano landed that same punch...

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    • #3
      "When I hit them in the body the big guys come down to my level." Jack Dempsey.

      Your boy is soft in the gut.
      Greb5000 likes this.

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      • #4
        I agree with Willie. There's a number of guys I'd favor but I think Dempsey is just style-make-fights tailored for whooping Fury.
        Greb5000 likes this.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by denium View Post
          Kronk Fury is a monster, as if a midget like Marciano or Louis could ever land a punch on him, let alone beat him.

          Size and skills matter, and no boxer throughout history has the physical attributes of Fury, this coupled with his iron will, heart & skillset makes him very close to being unbeatable.
          Fury has some nice throwback skills. He has decent timing, footwork, he fights at all ranges and can change tactics... But lets keep in mind something, best illustrated by an example. I was showing a typical opponent for Liston. This was considered a relatively weak time for the division and all... This opponent, did all the things that fighters did back then... so Fury is typical of what fighters were expected to do.

          With that said Fury is a horrid puncher. He loops his shots, grimaces as he sets to throw them, his elbows flair horribly on his jab... A fighter like Marciano would thwack Fury on his flaired elbow lol. His power would not allow him to keep a puncher like Louis at bay, Liston would be a horror for Fury... Fury is an excellent fighter and he does show skills we only used to see. But like most big men his punch is relatively weak... and any throwback guys would be more than willing to take a shot to get in on him and go to work. I adore the Gypsy King... but that is how I see it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Marchegiano View Post
            I agree with Willie. There's a number of guys I'd favor but I think Dempsey is just style-make-fights tailored for whooping Fury.
            Easy! Thats the Gypsy King you boys be speaking about yeah (said in a Cockney accent). A man with two arses!

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            • #7
              I'd take Fury to beat anyone. My fave of the olden day Heavyweights is Rocky Marciano. I couldn't see him beating Fury though, young Fury, sure, but not Fury of 2014 onward, and he seems even better since becoming Kronk Fury, the Voodoo King.

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              • #8
                Per the usual, this discussion comes down to whether or not you believe that being a bigger heavyweight is akin to being in a different weight class.

                Consider Duran or Benny Leonard, or whomever you consider to be the greatest lightweight ever, on a P4P (skill and ability level) theyd be far better than most any Light Heavy Weight. Yet if you put them in the ring as a lightweight, not putting on weight to make it even, would you favor them to beat a solid LHW (say Bivol) or is the weight difference too great? Frankly, I don't think a LW Duran could beat a LHW Bivol, despite the fact that Duran is rougher, tougher, more skilled, and better as a boxer.

                Now thats not to say that every fighter who simply weighed in at 175 pounds would beat a lightweight Duran, but setting the bar here at a title contender level (which Fury clearly is).

                So, does the size difference as heavy matter the same as weight difference between weight classes? Or, for some reason does being over the arbitrary weight of 175 lbs (original Heavyweight "floor") make size differences obsolete?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DeeMoney View Post
                  Per the usual, this discussion comes down to whether or not you believe that being a bigger heavyweight is akin to being in a different weight class.

                  Consider Duran or Benny Leonard, or whomever you consider to be the greatest lightweight ever, on a P4P (skill and ability level) theyd be far better than most any Light Heavy Weight. Yet if you put them in the ring as a lightweight, not putting on weight to make it even, would you favor them to beat a solid LHW (say Bivol) or is the weight difference too great? Frankly, I don't think a LW Duran could beat a LHW Bivol, despite the fact that Duran is rougher, tougher, more skilled, and better as a boxer.

                  Now thats not to say that every fighter who simply weighed in at 175 pounds would beat a lightweight Duran, but setting the bar here at a title contender level (which Fury clearly is).

                  So, does the size difference as heavy matter the same as weight difference between weight classes? Or, for some reason does being over the arbitrary weight of 175 lbs (original Heavyweight "floor") make size differences obsolete?
                  It is only this current generation of big boys that (some) have the athleticism of a LHW.

                  In the past the 'giants' were often slow of hand and foot and their size wasn't insurmountable for a normal size HW.

                  I'm not sure if that still holds for today's big boys.

                  But on the other hand I want to point to AJ as being that kind of athletic big boy, or would have a year and a half ago, but then boom along comes a pudgy smaller HW who takes him apart.

                  I will argue that in the past size among HW didn't matter as much as a LW jumping to MW, but as for today I'm not sure.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DeeMoney View Post
                    Per the usual, this discussion comes down to whether or not you believe that being a bigger heavyweight is akin to being in a different weight class.

                    Consider Duran or Benny Leonard, or whomever you consider to be the greatest lightweight ever, on a P4P (skill and ability level) theyd be far better than most any Light Heavy Weight. Yet if you put them in the ring as a lightweight, not putting on weight to make it even, would you favor them to beat a solid LHW (say Bivol) or is the weight difference too great? Frankly, I don't think a LW Duran could beat a LHW Bivol, despite the fact that Duran is rougher, tougher, more skilled, and better as a boxer.

                    Now thats not to say that every fighter who simply weighed in at 175 pounds would beat a lightweight Duran, but setting the bar here at a title contender level (which Fury clearly is).

                    So, does the size difference as heavy matter the same as weight difference between weight classes? Or, for some reason does being over the arbitrary weight of 175 lbs (original Heavyweight "floor") make size differences obsolete?
                    People used to think so, but as heavyweights got bigger and bigger, and coaches got better at training big heavyweights to use their size and strength effectively, a rethink was needed and the cruiserweight division was introduced.

                    Old timers lie Dempsey, Louis and Marciano were smaller than most of today's top class cruiserweights. They would have little to no chance of beating Tyson Fury.

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