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  • Training in a wheel chair

    Hi guys, had a dust up and cannot put weight on any leg for eight weeks. When I was hit I braced... I got it on the legs, one ankle fracture, one knee fracture, OPPOSITE SIDES! Another words... f u c k me up the a ss and thank you...

    A lot of us when we start a rehab program have a major disadvantage...compared to most we are considered, by conventional standards to be super strong. I mean if you have grappled, scooting around on a bed using your upper body strength is do-able. And I am betting most people here, in this section can lift their body weight up entirely (think like a dip) with b u tt in the air. The disadvantage is, physical rehab is not set up to accomodate people who are not the norm.

    I will use myself as an example... I am hardly "strong" at this time in my life, yet they consider the ability to touch the toes, lift up weight in a dip, and support the core in any position (think sit up range of movement)... to be amazing. It follows that our goals are different. I aim not to lose strength, rather than to develop enough strength to move the body enough to get from bed to wheel chair vis a vis commode.

    So what do we do? I will probably lift weights when I get out of here, I am using stress bands... and various leg lifts... But is there other stuff we can do?

    If you have any experience share it. I am doing a lot of shadow boxing, turning strikes, trying to concentrate on the core on the striking. My goal is to get intimate with the turning, lifting of the spine, and weight dropping on my strikes, since I do not have to concentrate on the legs for a while. when I get home? will probably incorporate dumbells with the strikes.

    Generally speaking, want to use this hiccup (the accident) as an opportunity to get better, get more precision on my striking.

  • #2
    That's a tough question. Other than pull-ups, most everything I do, including sit-ups (maybe they can be modified?), involve my legs in some way. I'm sure there are machines in the gym where you could isolate better and do more but in my neck of the woods anyway, the gyms are still closed.

    Seriously though, the most important thing is to heal. Whatever you do, don't set yourself back trying to do too much. Eight weeks isn't that long.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by billeau2 View Post
      Hi guys, had a dust up and cannot put weight on any leg for eight weeks. When I was hit I braced... I got it on the legs, one ankle fracture, one knee fracture, OPPOSITE SIDES! Another words... f u c k me up the a ss and thank you...

      A lot of us when we start a rehab program have a major disadvantage...compared to most we are considered, by conventional standards to be super strong. I mean if you have grappled, scooting around on a bed using your upper body strength is do-able. And I am betting most people here, in this section can lift their body weight up entirely (think like a dip) with b u tt in the air. The disadvantage is, physical rehab is not set up to accomodate people who are not the norm.

      I will use myself as an example... I am hardly "strong" at this time in my life, yet they consider the ability to touch the toes, lift up weight in a dip, and support the core in any position (think sit up range of movement)... to be amazing. It follows that our goals are different. I aim not to lose strength, rather than to develop enough strength to move the body enough to get from bed to wheel chair vis a vis commode.

      So what do we do? I will probably lift weights when I get out of here, I am using stress bands... and various leg lifts... But is there other stuff we can do?

      If you have any experience share it. I am doing a lot of shadow boxing, turning strikes, trying to concentrate on the core on the striking. My goal is to get intimate with the turning, lifting of the spine, and weight dropping on my strikes, since I do not have to concentrate on the legs for a while. when I get home? will probably incorporate dumbells with the strikes.

      Generally speaking, want to use this hiccup (the accident) as an opportunity to get better, get more precision on my striking.
      This is still a fresh injury/injuries. Easy is how you do it at this point. Stretch what ever you can and with the ones that you can't, still try. Let your body heal before you go trying to make it strong. Just stretch............Rockin'

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Rockin' View Post
        This is still a fresh injury/injuries. Easy is how you do it at this point. Stretch what ever you can and with the ones that you can't, still try. Let your body heal before you go trying to make it strong. Just stretch............Rockin'
        Thnks Rockin that makes a lot of sense.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by 4truth View Post
          That's a tough question. Other than pull-ups, most everything I do, including sit-ups (maybe they can be modified?), involve my legs in some way. I'm sure there are machines in the gym where you could isolate better and do more but in my neck of the woods anyway, the gyms are still closed.

          Seriously though, the most important thing is to heal. Whatever you do, don't set yourself back trying to do too much. Eight weeks isn't that long.
          I mean it goes without saying that going on a tear is counter productive The real nut is to see what opportunities the great provider provides when it seems everything is a bust lol. In this case, the stretching is one thing, as Rock says, you need that... you need movement and to stretch for the injury as well.

          When Braddock allegedlly lost it all, he was forced to develop his left and became a two handed fighter... when in a wheel chair because we don't have to preoccupy with weight placement and stepping, one can focus on turning the trunk, the shoulders, extension... all things that we take for granted, or don't focus on... Thats as far as Ive gotten.

          Comment


          • #6
            You might need a pretty nurse to ride you??

            ‘Y health is fine now...

            Stay strung and pease watch bbc stuff on the jews

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by billeau2 View Post
              Hi guys, had a dust up and cannot put weight on any leg for eight weeks. When I was hit I braced... I got it on the legs, one ankle fracture, one knee fracture, OPPOSITE SIDES! Another words... f u c k me up the a ss and thank you...

              A lot of us when we start a rehab program have a major disadvantage...compared to most we are considered, by conventional standards to be super strong. I mean if you have grappled, scooting around on a bed using your upper body strength is do-able. And I am betting most people here, in this section can lift their body weight up entirely (think like a dip) with b u tt in the air. The disadvantage is, physical rehab is not set up to accomodate people who are not the norm.

              I will use myself as an example... I am hardly "strong" at this time in my life, yet they consider the ability to touch the toes, lift up weight in a dip, and support the core in any position (think sit up range of movement)... to be amazing. It follows that our goals are different. I aim not to lose strength, rather than to develop enough strength to move the body enough to get from bed to wheel chair vis a vis commode.

              So what do we do? I will probably lift weights when I get out of here, I am using stress bands... and various leg lifts... But is there other stuff we can do?

              If you have any experience share it. I am doing a lot of shadow boxing, turning strikes, trying to concentrate on the core on the striking. My goal is to get intimate with the turning, lifting of the spine, and weight dropping on my strikes, since I do not have to concentrate on the legs for a while. when I get home? will probably incorporate dumbells with the strikes.

              Generally speaking, want to use this hiccup (the accident) as an opportunity to get better, get more precision on my striking.
              Arm bike & battle rope. When I broke my ankle thats what I'd do.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Boxfan83 View Post
                Arm bike & battle rope. When I broke my ankle thats what I'd do.
                Thanks for the tip!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zaroku View Post
                  You might need a pretty nurse to ride you??

                  'Y health is fine now...

                  Stay strung and pease watch bbc stuff on the jews
                  Amen! brother Z

                  Comment

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