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Any former skinny guys have had success gaining muscle mass?

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  • #11
    Lifting and constantly trying to progress but most importantly eat.....alot.

    Training doesn't directly build muscle its damages muscle tissue fiber but the body adapts and repairs the damaged tissue better than it was before. This is why sessions need to be harder because you are stronger after the repairing process.

    Muscles grow when you are resting and repairing so feed your body get enough sleep, train hard.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by mortal7 View Post
      Thanks guys. I'm going to work on my diet before I do any real lifting. As that poster said, the diet is key to gaining muscle. The lifting part, I'm not too worried about as that will come. Getting a good diet and being able to digest all of it is my main focus currently.
      just lift heavy and eat a fukload lol...

      Keep in mind, you can get fit and strong..lean etc...but putting on large slabs of muscle is largly genetic and takes a lot of work to break this....literally 80% of the dudes at the gym are juicing and don't have real muscle..is dissapears the second they get off the ****

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      • #13
        Like a previous poster said, lift 3-4 times a week. Also take in 1.5-2.0 grams of protein per pound you weigh. It needs to be a combination of lean meat protein and protein supplements. I went from joining the military in 2002 at 205 pounds to my deployment weight of 2007 of 245 pounds of sexy haha. I am 6'6". When I graduated high school I was 189 pounds. A beanpole.

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        • #14
          Here, sir.

          Back in 2006 I posted a thread a lot similar to this. I went from 5'8" and 132 to 5'8" (Haven't figured out the vertical gain, yet) and 151. I'm still "skinny," but I put on the weight, maintained 12 to 16% body fat (depending), and still have 'snap.'

          Here's the thing about gaining weight and how fast you can do it; you have to decide what priority 1 is. Getting the weight on? Gaining slow so as not to lose athleticism, flexibility, etc? Gaining 'healthy' weight? Are you willing to supplement? How important is the way you look?

          All of these questions are important because it effects how you will attack the issue of putting on pounds. I'd be happy to help however I can, but a few more details would be good. Immediately off the top, I'd say do this:

          1 - Squats. No, seriously. Squat twice per week. Don't front squat (take my word for it or ask, either way. But asking will necessitate links and descriptions and other nonsense). Stack on compound exercises like bench press and cleans (cleans are stupid-good for boxers). Also, isolate your shoulders for individual health.

          2 - If you squat, throw your 'core' work out. It's pointless. You can spend time on other things.

          3 - Weightlifting should be done 3x (up to 4 or 5, whatever you have time for) per week, no more than 45 minutes per session. Get the 5/3/1 manual by Jim Wendler.

          4 - Eat good food, and eat one metric F-load of it. A LOT of boxers (fighters and enduros in general) forget that keeping your engine running on high a lot (read: doing a lot of 'cardio') completely jacks with how much you need to eat to put on weight. This is why a lot of professionals walk around 20 pounds heavier than their weight class. It's MUCH easier to shed pounds than to gain weight*. So, you need to be eating a lot of high quality foods.

          Hope this helps. Feel free to ask anything. Remember this; specificity is the key to getting what you want, because it's the key to having a good plan.

          *This statement has not been evaluated or agreed upon by anyone fat. But skinny people will universally agree.

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          • #15
            Eat 300-500 more calories than you would to maintain weight this can be hard if your tall guy cause you'll have to eat a ****lod a day
            Rest is very important

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            • #16
              I put on a tad. Still lean/thin but I eat like hell.

              That's really the key...you have to force feed yourself even when you aren't hungry.

              It's math.

              3500 calories = 1 pound.

              So in order to gain....u gotta eat 3500 calories above what you need to survive.



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              • #17
                Originally posted by Run View Post
                I put on a tad. Still lean/thin but I eat like hell.

                That's really the key...you have to force feed yourself even when you aren't hungry.

                It's math.

                3500 calories = 1 pound.

                So in order to gain....u gotta eat 3500 calories above what you need to survive.
                Yeah, some people are naturally inclined to have a body that is like a furnace incinerating energy so its energy in vs energy out.

                I weigh what I did when I was 18 but had to eat so much more back then, glad I am getting a little older and don't have to constantly stuff my face to not be rail thin anymore.

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                • #18
                  For some people gaining weight is a very hard task.

                  I have a very bad genetic and never succesfully gained mass even with proper training and food.

                  I tend to become fat rather than muskular when gain weight.

                  I'm 175cm x 58kg right now. 9.4% actual BF but still not looking lean. I'm typical skinny fat body type.

                  It's genetics, but isn't that problem, you see many boxers with no 6 pack and popping muscles but still strong and skilled.
                  Last edited by Helm; 03-15-2015, 04:05 AM.

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                  • #19
                    For some it's harder than others. There is however also a lot of misinformation about trainingroutines and diet. A lot of people say I have a good diet and a good training schedule, but really don't have a clue about what they are doing.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Facade View Post
                      For some it's harder than others. There is however also a lot of misinformation about trainingroutines and diet. A lot of people say I have a good diet and a good training schedule, but really don't have a clue about what they are doing.
                      There are some obvious common understandings related to diet and training depending on what your goal is but what people don't like to hear is essentially you are on your own and are going to have to figure this out by trial and error.

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