icon Updated at 02:56 AM EDT, Thu Oct 13, 2011

Haye: Money Won't Temp Me Back, I'm Over The Hill

David Haye insists no amount of money could ever tempt him to fight again after he ended months of uncertainty today by calling time on his glittering career.

Haye has been at the centre of conflicting rumors about his future since he lost his WBA heavyweight title to arch enemy Wladimir Klitschko in July with a comprehensive points defeat.

Earlier this week, Bernd Boente, the promoter for both Klitschko brothers insisted there was a strong chance that Haye would fight the older of the two Ukrainian stars, Vitali, next summer for one last big pay day.

The prospect of a lucrative bout against the WBC champion was ruled out today, however, with Haye sticking to the vow he made 20 years ago that he would hang up his gloves by the time he reached 31.

When asked whether a pot of £100million would tempt him back in to the ring to take on either of the Klitschkos, Haye said: "No. I'm done. I'm over the hill. I'm finished.

"It was always in my mind to retire on this day.

"I have had 20 years in the game - that's a long time to go through rigorous training and be punched in the head every day. It's not fun.

"I have already moved on. This decision hasn't been easy. You always want revenge and to go out with your best performance but in life you don't always get what you want.

"I have to accept the fact that the fight isn't happening and move on."

Haye was speaking after cutting a cake to mark his 31st birthday at his London gym.

Vitali said earlier this summer that the feud between his brother and Haye meant he would relish the challenge of knocking the Londoner out and Boente's comments seemed to further the chances of a fight taking place, but Haye says it was never a prospect.

"It didn't come close to happening at all. We never had any serious offers from them," he said.

Haye ends his career with the tag of being a two-weight former champion who has lost just twice in his 27-fight career.

A fiery character never afraid of causing controversy, he split opinion in the boxing world after moving up from cruiserweight in 2008 and vowing to unify the heavyweight division by taking all four belts off the Klitschkos while simultaneously goading the brothers with a barrage of public insults.

Before his fight against Wladimir in 2009, which was later scrapped due to Haye's back injury, the Briton wore a t-shirt that depicted him raising aloft the decapitated heads of both brothers and before this summer's fight, the Londoner launched a game which showed him decapitating a Klitschko lookalike.

His critics lambasted his cockiness and he was made to look a fool after being easily beaten by Wladimir in July and then going on to blame the defeat on a broken toe.

Haye admits he was upset to lose his world title Wladimir, but insisted he would not change anything about how he has conducted himself throughout his career.

"I have no regrets at all," he said.

"I have done and said some controversial things, but that got me where I am today.

"I would have liked to unify the heavyweight division. That was my ultimate goal.

"I unified the cruiserweight division but I fell short against Wladimir.

"That was more than a loss. I hate the thought of it, but in life you can't win all the time. I have to find something else now and start winning at something again."

Before he embarked on his next career step - a life acting - Haye could not resist one last dig at the Klitschkos.

"Wladimir is fighting one of my old victims, Jean-Marc Mormeck next. That will be one of the most unappealing heavyweight contests for many years," said Haye, who picked his points win over Nikolai Valuev as his career highlight.

"It paints a really bleak picture for the future of the division.

"I can't think why a person who has as many titles as Wladimir is challenging someone who has done nothing. It makes me think the division is back to what it was before I got here."