View Single Post
Old 07-12-2011, 09:19 AM #19
r3robinson r3robinson is offline
Contender
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 170
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Rep Power: 7
r3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond reputer3robinson has a reputation beyond repute
Points: 9,392.46
Bank: 0.00
Total Points: 9,392.46
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuauhtémoc1502 View Post
If you read the article it talks about muscle mass, being "jacked".

Boxers aren't jacked at all, on the contrary, they are as lean as they can possibly be.

You see pics of Margarito, Klitchko, Pacman or other ripped fighters and think they are jacked but they are not. They are ripped and down to very little body fat but will rehydrate in 24 hours and look different.

These other athletes like sprinters, wrestlers, gymnasts, have muscle gain because weight isn't as much of an issue or in the case of wrestlers, they need to be strong for grappling.

Boxers aren't necessarily strong like wrestlers, they have strong punches but I bet you most can't bench press a ton of weight.

I boxed all my life and never lifted weights.
Quote:
Originally Posted by vacon04 View Post
Oh no, I'm not missing that fact at all, because as I've said it depends on a routine that's made specially for boxers. What I'm saying is that weight lifting can be used to increase strength and speed without the need to create too much muscle mass, in fact by only gaining a really small amount of muscle mass you can gain a lot of power.

Weight training for boxers should be kept to about 2 or at most 3 times per week (and 3 times is a little bit too much IMO) ... but as I've said the main point of those sessions is to gains strength and speed, not endurance. Now, gaining strength for example doesn't means gaining mass, at least not enough so you can call it "bulking up".

Gaining mass is mainly because of an hypertrophy training, a range of 8 to 12 repetitions, but a boxer should do weight lifting with a range of 2 to 5 repetitions, which generates a lot less mass than an hypertrophy training but helps a lot to gain absolute strength with functional muscle mass, not bulking up at all. Also, as a boxer needs to be explosive, the lifting should be done in an explosive way, not slowly as most weight lifters do.

So you could still gain strength and power without really bulking up, and also without sacrificing flexibility. It's really about creating a good workout specifically designed for a boxer to get great results without the disadvantages of gaining mass or losing flexibility.
i have been a trainer for a long time and i must say that weight training makes a difference in a possitive way. but keep in mind you have to keep it moderate like i posted earlier......when i 1st strated training i was against weight and only used Calisthenics but after some time and i mean some time i gave the weights thing a chance and it was like night and day.... just make sure that you strectch before after and make strecthing part of you cool down to help with current and added flexiblity.
r3robinson is offline   Reply With Quote