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  • rihanabr
    replied
    Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

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  • camW00dS
    replied
    The Dark Tower

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  • K-DOGG
    replied
    Okay, today's recommendations are fiction:

    1. "The Lord of the Rings" by J.R.R. Tolkien....If you have not read this yet.....WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH YOU?! LOL!!! Naw, jes kiddin'. I didn't read it myself until after I'd seen the first movie. It is far better than the Peter Jackson series, though, he does do the books justice. Tolkein truly did start the modern fantasy genre in many ways. Just about every story which followed this book has elements of it.....and most assuredly the old RPG's and I'd venture to say, World of Warcraft even. If you like sci-fi/fantasy, you owe it to yourself to read it.......or all three, if you choose to read them separately. It is a long work.

    2. "House of Leaves" by Mark Z. Danielewski.....This book is a mind-job unlike any I've ever picked up before. You essentially have three stories going on in one, with one or more of the "authors" loosing their sanity while they tell the story. I will warn you, it is dark and it will test the limits of your own sanity. The primary premise is about an old country house in the middle of nowhere, which has a door which leads to a "closet", which defies the laws of physics, as it, technically, should be protruding from the outside of the house....and the inside, gradually grows bigger. It only gets weirder from there.

    3. "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee......This is an old standby and you might have even been assigned it in school; but it's one of my favorites, so I thought I'd give it a mention. If you are unfamiliar with it, it's set in the segregated south and involved the trial of a man for a crime which he did not commit. It's almost like a 1960's version of Tom Sawyer, had he been a girl and faced the challenges of that era in a small southern town. Excellent, excellent read.

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  • K-DOGG
    replied
    These are nonfiction; but very, very interesting and will get you thinking.

    The 12th Planet.....by Zacheria Sitchin......this is actually the first of what became a seven-book series, called "The Earth Chronicles". It is an unconventional look at our ancient origins through the translation of Sumerian tablets by Sitchin

    God is Red...by Vine Deloria Jr....a Native American take on religion which really does a good job at illustrating how origins of different religions are geographical in nature and why its difficult for people from one location to grasp a religion from another. Its really informative on how "we" think and why.

    The Jesus Papers.....by Baigent.....he was the co-author of "Holy Blood, Holy Grail", which examined Mary Magdeline's role long before Dan Grown did a fictitious take. This book goes further in tracing down who Jesus really was and manuscripts which offer a contradictory picture to the gospels, as well as secrets being kept by "the church", potentially. Its a pretty good read.



    ....that's all for now.

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  • MANGLER
    replied
    Bloods by Wallace Terry. Great book about the plight of black soldiers in Vietnam.

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  • SlickRikki
    replied
    Bentley Little's The Association,It's an amazing Fiction Novel

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  • Junito-Rulez
    replied
    A hundred years of solitude by Garcia Marquez.

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  • braydenking
    replied
    Learn more because my english poor,so sorry for that !

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  • Source
    replied
    Just read 'The First Commandment' from Brad Thor.

    Really like the fast phased story.

    ISBN: 987-1-84739-194-0

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  • Drunken Cat
    replied
    To begin with it has nothing to do with archaism, with the salvaging of obsolete words and turns of speech, or with the setting up of a "standard English" which must never be departed from. On the contrary, it is especially concerned with the scrapping of every word or idiom which has outworn its usefulness. It has nothing to do with correct grammar and syntax, which are of no importance so long as one makes one's meaning clear, or with the avoidance of Americanisms, or with having what is called a "good prose style." On the other hand, it is not concerned with fake simplicity and the attempt to make written English colloquial. Nor does it even imply in every case preferring the Saxon word to the Latin one, though it does imply using the fewest and shortest words that will cover one's meaning. What is above all needed is to let the meaning choose the word, and not the other way around. In prose, the worst thing one can do with words is surrender to them. When you think of a concrete object, you think wordlessly, and then, if you want to describe the thing you have been visualizing you probably hunt about until you find the exact words that seem to fit it. When you think of something abstract you are more inclined to use words from the start, and unless you make a conscious effort to prevent it, the existing dialect will come rushing in and do the job for you, at the expense of blurring or even changing your meaning. Probably it is better to put off using words as long as possible and get one's meaning as clear as one can through pictures and sensations. Afterward one can choose -- not simply accept -- the phrases that will best cover the meaning, and then switch round and decide what impressions one's words are likely to make on another person. This last effort of the mind cuts out all stale or mixed images, all prefabricated phrases, needless repetitions, and humbug and vagueness generally. But one can often be in doubt about the effect of a word or a phrase, and one needs rules that one can rely on when instinct fails. I think the following rules will cover most cases:
    (i) Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
    (ii) Never us a long word where a short one will do.
    (iii) If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
    (iv) Never use the passive where you can use the active.
    (v) Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
    (vi) Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.
    These rules sound elementary, and so they are, but they demand a deep change of attitude in anyone who has grown used to writing in the style now fashionable. One could keep all of them and still write bad English, but one could not write the kind of stuff that I quoted in those five specimens at the beginning of this article.
    I have not here been considering the literary use of language, but merely language as an instrument for expressing and not for concealing or preventing thought. Stuart Chase and others have come near to claiming that all abstract words are meaningless, and have used this as a pretext for advocating a kind of political quietism. Since you don't know what Fascism is, how can you struggle against Fascism? One need not swallow such absurdities as this, but one ought to recognize that the present political chaos is connected with the decay of language, and that one can probably bring about some improvement by starting at the verbal end. If you simplify your English, you are freed from the worst follies of orthodoxy. You cannot speak any of the necessary dialects, and when you make a stupid remark its stupidity will be obvious, even to yourself. Political language -- and with variations this is true of all political parties, from Conservatives to Anarchists -- is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind. One cannot change this all in a moment, but one can at least change one's own habits, and from time to time one can even, if one jeers loudly enough, send some worn-out and useless phrase -- some jackboot, Achilles' heel, hotbed, melting pot, acid test, veritable inferno, or other lump of verbal refuse -- into the dustbin, where it belongs.
    ..........

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