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Any of you find outer space extremely weird and surreal?

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  • Originally posted by -Kev- View Post

    We do not know less about our oceans than we do about space. That is discussed earlier in the thread I believe, or some other thread.

    There is a misconception that because we still need to physically explore like 80 something % of the ocean, that we know less about it than space.

    Here is the issue: We have already explored the ocean floors with the help of marine engineering advancements.

    We do not where Space ends, or if it does end, or what is way out there, and we never will get anywhere near the “edge”.

    Lastly, we have only sent probes out to explore space, and that is only our own Solar system.

    While we have explored 5-10% (roughly) of our oceans, and have actual footage of our ocean floors, I couldn’t even tell you the % of space we have explored. We do not even know where it ends. We can only talk about what we have observed.
    Have we actually explored the deepest parts of the ocean?

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    • Bizarre argument to me, both the deep oceans and deep space are absolutely fascinating but the fact that folk are even having the discussion is a perfect illustration of the human minds utter inability to truly comprehend the sheer.scale of the universe.

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      • [Content is Protected, Please Register For Free To Unlock This Content]


        https://www.sciencealert.com/watch-s...simulation/amp

        More star eating black hole awesomeness.

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        • Originally posted by markusmod View Post

          Have we actually explored the deepest parts of the ocean?
          Yes. A while ago. That can actually be googled. It’s supposed to be common knowledge, but unfortunately, it isn’t.

          It’s called the Five Deeps Expedition.

          https://www.defense.gov/News/Feature...part-of-ocean/

          It’s a step in the right direction for explorers and us who follow new discoveries.

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          • Originally posted by Citizen Koba View Post
            Bizarre argument to me, both the deep oceans and deep space are absolutely fascinating but the fact that folk are even having the discussion is a perfect illustration of the human minds utter inability to truly comprehend the sheer.scale of the universe.
            The news channels don’t help either.

            People have outdated information that they got from the Discovery channel when they were kids.

            There are so many people who have never heard of the Five Deeps Expedition. To know about these kinds of breakthroughs, you need to actively follow geological breakthrough news. Which is very sad.

            It reminds me of the “blue blood” claim that everyone spoke of like it’s a fact.

            “Our blood is actually blue, it just turns red when exposed.”

            Or how about the other “fact” about the brain?

            “We only use 10% of our brain.”

            Well if that is the case, we would be vegetable as the entire brain is working even in small tasks. So if you are using only 10% of your brain, you would be brain dead.

            But these are myths that actually are still in circulation.

            “We know more about space than we do about the Earth’s oceans. We have not seen the ocean floors yet.”

            No, we actually have. It’s public knowledge. Even federal gov agencies reported on it.

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            • The fact that we have a measurement of all of the ocean floors, including the Mariana Trench, says everything we know about space.

              We can’t measure the universe. It is impossible for humans to do that right now or probably ever. Scientists/astronomers, can’t find life in space. As far as humans have looked, scientists have confirmed thousands of exoplanet. But so far, no sign of life.

              We know there’s life in the deep, dark, ocean floors. We have seen them. They were recorded. I am sure there’s more species to discover, but there are no chances of discovering other species outside of the Earth. Not right now.

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              • Originally posted by -Kev- View Post

                Yes. A while ago. That can actually be googled. It’s supposed to be common knowledge, but unfortunately, it isn’t.

                It’s called the Five Deeps Expedition.

                https://www.defense.gov/News/Feature...part-of-ocean/

                It’s a step in the right direction for explorers and us who follow new discoveries.
                Its seems they made it down, but didn't spend a lot of time there for any real exploring. Who knows what they can find if they hunt around.

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                • I do not want to pollute the magnificent lounge, that is full of great discussions, with more of my space threads. So I will make my not so random thought in a comment here.

                  I don’t think there was “nothing” before the big bang. I think space was already very vast and very empty, few objects, very far between. I have had this thought for years. The big bang was a mere coincidence. The universe goes through an eternal amount of “big freeze/heat deaths”, and indefinitely goes on alone and devoid of any action for an amount of years too long to even bother thinking about it or throwing out guesses.

                  Earthlings, or any intelligent civilizations in the universe as we currently know it, are/were unable to “know” what was before the big bang. This is because there is no information left from past generations of those who inhabited the universe before its death and rebirth. Unlike us, who are able to spread information forward because we are so small and therefore, our information is more manageable. The events that happen at any point in time in any generation of intelligent life in the universe, is just way TMI to pass it forward.

                  While there is evidence of an “expanding” universe, the universe we can observe, it doesn’t rule out that the universe does not go through these “big bangs” constantly and the expanding universe as we observe it is just another generation of “life” in space.

                  And life in space is, well, astronomical. It’s like modern h/mo sapiens being around for over 200,000 years, which seems like an eternity. But dinosaurs were around for billions of years, and humans came around 10s of millions of years after dinosaurs became extinct. What gave way to humans was the extinction of the dinosaurs, caused by a catastrophic event. But Earth was already there when humans were born. Who is to say the universe hasn’t gone through this but on a much larger scale?

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                  • In 20 years, we might all be having a chance to go to outer space.

                    A ticket for $10,000? I would go for that.

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                    • Blackholes seem like the Universes delete button/trash can

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