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How would America be different if these things occurred

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  • #21
    Originally posted by TJ highway View Post
    The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo signed on February 2, 1848, ended the war between the United States and Mexico. ... By its terms, Mexico ceded 55 percent of its territory, including parts of present-day Arizona, California, New Mexico, Texas, Colorado, Nevada, and Utah, to the United States.

    My family on my maternal grandmother can trace her family roots to Califas (California) 100 years before the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

    This means Mexico/Spain/Mexico and probably the Aztec empire before Mexico. We never left.

    The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo gave Mexicans the right to remain in United States territory or to move to Mexico. ... These people could choose to retain Mexican citizenship or become citizens of the United States.

    We never left.


    same here... white ppl make treatise and break oaths
    Seanz San Antonio Texas ... our ppl are salt of the earth

    my son married a white girl who cooks Mexican food knows boxing

    life is good

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Boxfan83 View Post

      My son has a white GF (taller than him lol) we joke with him when he comes home after dinner at their house and ask him if he had "Hamburger Helper?" but many times they make Mexican dishes haha!
      LOL. Thats a great thing about families. I was fortunate to be a chef and always loved great food. When I met my wife though, it took me to a whole new level. She is Cajun, and I learned all about the foods in Southern Louisiana. I had learned about Puerto Rican food as a kid, because many of my friends were Puerto Rican. Patelles... Yum! Later my Korean friend taught me about that cuisine. I cooked in a Filipino restaurant, then a 'French restaurant. But after living down south for certain months when we visited my wife's family, I would just go on a tear! wanted to learn about how the sausages and Gumbos were made, proper Ettoffe's... I loved the experience and now know that food, it is part of how my sons grew up, and a good deal of what I cooked for the family.

      Mexican food is great. One of my favorite things to eat in the world is carnitas, or Al pasteur (sp?), simply fried in its own fat, with spices, treated with lime juice, and served with fresh salsa on a corn tortilla. I also came to San Francisco young, and at that time this was the only place to get these giant burritos... those things grew me right! I would be famished after a work out and get grilled chicken, rice beans, sour cream grauc, and salsa in this giant tin foil wrapped tortilla. BOy!!! did that hit that spot. I also saw in New York when the mexicans started to come into East Harlem. The restaurants were great. The food was fresh, inexpensive and always well prepared.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by billeau2 View Post

        Its a heinious way of winning a war... along with Sherman's burning every damn thing. But it is ethically in bounds as a strategy. Its just that in days gone by there were more options for the common soldger. In Japan you gave your weakest troops "length" with a spear. This length equalized them against a superior opponent with a sword. Eventually that sword became a Rokushaku Bo (six foot staff) that served as a great fighting weapon in the reconstruction period of Japan (Nara/ Eido). One could even hide a blade in these staffs for transport. Of course there were schools of combat that focused on stick weapons, Haliberds, etc. Its just that teaching the stick was soooo much easier than teaching the blade.

        But in the United States Civil War, there was little recourse for a soldger who was not special. And unlike clean cuts which would mostly kill quickly, or present a neat wound... The damn firearms would crudely blow into a person... Creating the worse, messy holes in people. People died horribly.
        Oh! Another follower of Feudal Japan? Excellent! Funny you bring this up, Wife and I just watched Hidden Fortress Saturday night, and I went on a bit of a tangent on how most films are historically inaccurate having all samurai with katana regardless of the time period, and how pleased I was that the Samurai in that particular film used Yari instead.

        Another example of the strategy discussed earlier would be Stalin's "strategy" against Hitlers invasion at the end of WW2

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        • #24
          Originally posted by _Rexy_ View Post

          Oh! Another follower of Feudal Japan? Excellent! Funny you bring this up, Wife and I just watched Hidden Fortress Saturday night, and I went on a bit of a tangent on how most films are historically inaccurate having all samurai with katana regardless of the time period, and how pleased I was that the Samurai in that particular film used Yari instead.

          Another example of the strategy discussed earlier would be Stalin's "strategy" against Hitlers invasion at the end of WW2
          Good Point Rexy. Ask people what the original weapon for the Samurai was and 90% of them will say the sword. In fact the Heinan period courts first instilled archery, the bow and arrow and then the Yari (spear) and then the sword came. Really the design of the sword and favorable soil and ore conditions helped the sword along, and the genius of designers like Masamuni. Some of the oldest KoRyu in Japan emphasize the Bo and the Kodachi short sword. It was thought that the Kodachi was primary because you closed with it and it was what was used to dispatch an enemy. Yeah I love the Samurai from studying older forms of ju Jutsu

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          • #25
            question 2 pretty much eliminates the need of question 1.

            If we're assuming colonization takes a different course because it begins later. maybe instead of being the United States, a collection of English speaking people, this country is just a collection of poor Spanish speaking countries, maybe.

            My, would have been, ancestors never have made it here and are probably still in Russia and Ireland.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by _Rexy_ View Post

              Oh! Another follower of Feudal Japan? Excellent! Funny you bring this up, Wife and I just watched Hidden Fortress Saturday night, and I went on a bit of a tangent on how most films are historically inaccurate having all samurai with katana regardless of the time period, and how pleased I was that the Samurai in that particular film used Yari instead.

              Another example of the strategy discussed earlier would be Stalin's "strategy" against Hitlers invasion at the end of WW2
              A new Netflix series just dropped on the topic

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              • #27
                Originally posted by markusmod View Post

                A new Netflix series just dropped on the topic
                I noticed that the other day, made me think I was being listened to because I was just talking about cancelling Netflix lol

                thanks for the heads up though! Gonna watch some
                today when my son naps

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by billeau2 View Post

                  Good Point Rexy. Ask people what the original weapon for the Samurai was and 90% of them will say the sword. In fact the Heinan period courts first instilled archery, the bow and arrow and then the Yari (spear) and then the sword came. Really the design of the sword and favorable soil and ore conditions helped the sword along, and the genius of designers like Masamuni. Some of the oldest KoRyu in Japan emphasize the Bo and the Kodachi short sword. It was thought that the Kodachi was primary because you closed with it and it was what was used to dispatch an enemy. Yeah I love the Samurai from studying older forms of ju Jutsu
                  Very true! Samurai all started as horse bound archers and evolved from there. If my memory serves me, they used a few different types of swords here and there but didn’t switch over to the katana until after the first Mongol invasion when they learned their current swords were impervious to the mongols thick armor.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by _Rexy_ View Post

                    Very true! Samurai all started as horse bound archers and evolved from there. If my memory serves me, they used a few different types of swords here and there but didn’t switch over to the katana until after the first Mongol invasion when they learned their current swords were impervious to the mongols thick armor.
                    its all in the curve of the blade. Up until that time all swords were straight, modelled after Tang dynasty blades from China. In India and the Middle East swords were curved for specific attaks and uses, to attack vital points at the seams of armor, which could not be protected. In South East Asia you also see tribes with sophistiated blades used to do thngs like puncture an artery without needing to break the skin hard, etc. But there was no blade that just had a curve for general design purposes.

                    This curve does some interesting things. It actually compresses the length so one has a greater cutting surface. it also allows angles to be used where the blade tip can get there very fast and while the rest of the sword is held comfortably. It also makes the blade stronger... apparently the physics of a slight curviture gives more tensil strenght.

                    In my opinion another real genius invention was the tip design of the Wakazashi, Kodashi and (my favorite) the Tanto. This blade gives one an extra cutting surface. When learning to use the Tanto, if one pays attention to this extra surface area, there are all kinds of cuts one can make.

                    The Mongol invasions definitely taught the Japanese a lot about their technologies! I have not heard if this changed their blade mechanics but it sounds right to me. Straight swords, especially the Chinese swords of that time were primarily for dueling. I don't think the Japanese even had the Odachi yet, which is a large sword, for horseback and distance. The Mongol battles were very interesting! I mean before I looked into them I did not know how much they squirmished! During the second battle the Mongols had taken some areas, I believe in the North.

                    Many people say the Japanese were lucky because of the so called divine winds (Kamakize) but I do not buy this. There is a reason why the Mongols did not come back after the second battle, when they had made some headway... The Mongols had a limited technology that they mastered... The Japanese had a more varied technology had more circumstances to deal with. Of course the Mongols had more varied enemies... But the horses and bows with the blitz was so far ahead of the rest of the people they conquered back then!

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                    • #30
                      I wish America had said "no" to slavery from inception. We wouldn't be having all the issues that we're having now had it not been for slavery.

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