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  • Heavy bag training questions?

    Hi there,

    I sparred as a kid for a while, but left before my medical (home troubles..a little wild as a kid).

    I recently bought a skipping rope and put a heavy bag up as a means of fitness (bought bag gloves of course as well).

    I have a few questions though on bag training, like I said I only sparred for a few months as a kid and didn't get too much time for questions before I left.

    If anyone can help with these probably, simple questions that would help a lot, probably maximize my workout times and make them more efficient. If you can answer just one, that would be great it's probably a group effort.

    1). They say I should pop the bag and Not push it? But how do you build efficient power on the bag when you're just stinging the bag and not hitting it properly? Not affording yourself any resistance? Is that not where strength ad power is going to be gradually built? Even when you look at weight training? It's the resistance that builds you eventually.

    2). How do I know if I'm popping instead of pushing?

    3). I remember sparring and shadow boxing as a kid and being trained to 'be loose but have your fists tight'? Problem is, when I try and hit the bag like this, if I tighten my fists my whole body goes tight, and I loose grace and flexibility? If I partially loosen my hands and just snap-tighten them on impact, I find I can flow like the wind. A bit like the old Bruce lee way of punching, I suppose? Why is the right way and how do I accomplish this?

    4). My first trainers used to say 'don't hit from your forearms..your forearms are for hugging your girlfriend'. The rest I can't remember properly because it was such a long time ago, but if I remember correctly it was to hit from the shoulders? Is that right or is it to hit from the back? Or both? Does that apply to a jab, as well or would that not be too much of a tell for a trained fight to pick up?

    5). I did this strange thing, that If I apply form, I lose all grace, technical ease and power. Does anyone out there know what I mean? Or are these just the beginning throes of learning an art again?

    6). Oh yes, before I or get this question. The right straight and right cross are essentially two punches that leave the chin and come straight back, right. If I stand back and throw a one two naturally (on the pads) my left goes straight out and comes right back, but my right goes straight out, snaps and then has a little dip, kinda cut motion at the end upon impact, like a bit of a whip, that gives it tremendous power and ease. I'm very relaxed when throwing it like this. There's no tell, and it works very well. When I do it the 'right' way (let it out and pull it straight back, like a fishing rod lol) my whole fighting stance, and maneuverability seems to go stale and I lose power. Which is the right way?

    7). I love hitting the bag so much, I hit it 20 - 30 minutes in the morning and can feel I've worked out and had enough. But when I'm laying, resting and watching tv at night time I feel that hunger to hit it again? Is this advisable to do? Is it safe? I don't so it at the moment, only work it in the mornings, once a day.

    8). I'm a tall guy and throwing hooks feel awkward to me at the moment. Unless I fire them out just the way my body feels right when I'm in at the bag, or taking a little step out, this way or that as my body sees fit naturally to do. I've tried quite a few youtube training videos I check them out. But nothing yet feels solid. Anyone recommend any great youtube video for the hook that you've seen, that really works? Both left lead and right infighting hooks I mean. As I'm told that's what they really are. Or any great practical advice from a a easier fighter that would work? I know they're not really basic fighting punches, but it's still nice to have a variety of things to work out on the bag. And just to e able to throw them coming on or out.

    That's probably all for now, damn I know that seem like a lot, but it's what was on my phones notepad as I've been working the bag, and just hitting these things down. These things have been kinda irking me. I have a bit of an analytical mind I suppose and it does go straight to enquiring things. I suppose as well you're never really gonna be happy if you find you're trying to do something you can't perfect.

    Any help would be appreciated, even if you just scroll past them and see you can help on one of the questions?

    Kindly,
    Tony.

  • #2
    Punch through the bag, whoever told you to "pop" the bag is a idiot.

    You can switch back and forth once you get good, and want to train punching and boxing at different speeds. In that case than taking some power off your punches is acceptable.

    But punching through the bag should always be the main objective.

    As my trainer use to say, "were not trying to hit people in the head, we want to find out how far we can push our hand through it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Google heavy bag/ boxing /training etc..................to explain it is a waste of time. You need the visual. I'm sure you can find "techniques" regarding pronating your punches along with how to utilize the bag for conditioning purposes.
      There are many uses for a heavy and very specific ones right down to how high you hang it to working 180 to 360 degrees!
      Search it out there's plenty of info out there......
      Ray

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Tony. View Post
        Hi there,

        I sparred as a kid for a while, but left before my medical (home troubles..a little wild as a kid).

        I recently bought a skipping rope and put a heavy bag up as a means of fitness (bought bag gloves of course as well).

        I have a few questions though on bag training, like I said I only sparred for a few months as a kid and didn't get too much time for questions before I left.

        If anyone can help with these probably, simple questions that would help a lot, probably maximize my workout times and make them more efficient. If you can answer just one, that would be great it's probably a group effort.

        1). They say I should pop the bag and Not push it? But how do you build efficient power on the bag when you're just stinging the bag and not hitting it properly? Not affording yourself any resistance? Is that not where strength ad power is going to be gradually built? Even when you look at weight training? It's the resistance that builds you eventually.

        2). How do I know if I'm popping instead of pushing?

        3). I remember sparring and shadow boxing as a kid and being trained to 'be loose but have your fists tight'? Problem is, when I try and hit the bag like this, if I tighten my fists my whole body goes tight, and I loose grace and flexibility? If I partially loosen my hands and just snap-tighten them on impact, I find I can flow like the wind. A bit like the old Bruce lee way of punching, I suppose? Why is the right way and how do I accomplish this?

        4). My first trainers used to say 'don't hit from your forearms..your forearms are for hugging your girlfriend'. The rest I can't remember properly because it was such a long time ago, but if I remember correctly it was to hit from the shoulders? Is that right or is it to hit from the back? Or both? Does that apply to a jab, as well or would that not be too much of a tell for a trained fight to pick up?

        5). I did this strange thing, that If I apply form, I lose all grace, technical ease and power. Does anyone out there know what I mean? Or are these just the beginning throes of learning an art again?

        6). Oh yes, before I or get this question. The right straight and right cross are essentially two punches that leave the chin and come straight back, right. If I stand back and throw a one two naturally (on the pads) my left goes straight out and comes right back, but my right goes straight out, snaps and then has a little dip, kinda cut motion at the end upon impact, like a bit of a whip, that gives it tremendous power and ease. I'm very relaxed when throwing it like this. There's no tell, and it works very well. When I do it the 'right' way (let it out and pull it straight back, like a fishing rod lol) my whole fighting stance, and maneuverability seems to go stale and I lose power. Which is the right way?

        7). I love hitting the bag so much, I hit it 20 - 30 minutes in the morning and can feel I've worked out and had enough. But when I'm laying, resting and watching tv at night time I feel that hunger to hit it again? Is this advisable to do? Is it safe? I don't so it at the moment, only work it in the mornings, once a day.

        8). I'm a tall guy and throwing hooks feel awkward to me at the moment. Unless I fire them out just the way my body feels right when I'm in at the bag, or taking a little step out, this way or that as my body sees fit naturally to do. I've tried quite a few youtube training videos I check them out. But nothing yet feels solid. Anyone recommend any great youtube video for the hook that you've seen, that really works? Both left lead and right infighting hooks I mean. As I'm told that's what they really are. Or any great practical advice from a a easier fighter that would work? I know they're not really basic fighting punches, but it's still nice to have a variety of things to work out on the bag. And just to e able to throw them coming on or out.

        That's probably all for now, damn I know that seem like a lot, but it's what was on my phones notepad as I've been working the bag, and just hitting these things down. These things have been kinda irking me. I have a bit of an analytical mind I suppose and it does go straight to enquiring things. I suppose as well you're never really gonna be happy if you find you're trying to do something you can't perfect.

        Any help would be appreciated, even if you just scroll past them and see you can help on one of the questions?

        Kindly,
        Tony.


        Watch Floyd Mayweather working on the Heavybag.

        Watch your technique while punching and dont try to be like Mike Tyson or whoever.

        Other than that, Im too lazy to read your whole post.

        Comment


        • #5
          I've seen this..

          I'll drop a response when I get home tonight.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tony. View Post
            Hi there,

            I sparred as a kid for a while, but left before my medical (home troubles..a little wild as a kid).

            I recently bought a skipping rope and put a heavy bag up as a means of fitness (bought bag gloves of course as well).

            I have a few questions though on bag training, like I said I only sparred for a few months as a kid and didn't get too much time for questions before I left.

            If anyone can help with these probably, simple questions that would help a lot, probably maximize my workout times and make them more efficient. If you can answer just one, that would be great it's probably a group effort.

            1). They say I should pop the bag and Not push it? But how do you build efficient power on the bag when you're just stinging the bag and not hitting it properly? Not affording yourself any resistance? Is that not where strength ad power is going to be gradually built? Even when you look at weight training? It's the resistance that builds you eventually.

            2). How do I know if I'm popping instead of pushing?

            3). I remember sparring and shadow boxing as a kid and being trained to 'be loose but have your fists tight'? Problem is, when I try and hit the bag like this, if I tighten my fists my whole body goes tight, and I loose grace and flexibility? If I partially loosen my hands and just snap-tighten them on impact, I find I can flow like the wind. A bit like the old Bruce lee way of punching, I suppose? Why is the right way and how do I accomplish this?

            4). My first trainers used to say 'don't hit from your forearms..your forearms are for hugging your girlfriend'. The rest I can't remember properly because it was such a long time ago, but if I remember correctly it was to hit from the shoulders? Is that right or is it to hit from the back? Or both? Does that apply to a jab, as well or would that not be too much of a tell for a trained fight to pick up?

            5). I did this strange thing, that If I apply form, I lose all grace, technical ease and power. Does anyone out there know what I mean? Or are these just the beginning throes of learning an art again?

            6). Oh yes, before I or get this question. The right straight and right cross are essentially two punches that leave the chin and come straight back, right. If I stand back and throw a one two naturally (on the pads) my left goes straight out and comes right back, but my right goes straight out, snaps and then has a little dip, kinda cut motion at the end upon impact, like a bit of a whip, that gives it tremendous power and ease. I'm very relaxed when throwing it like this. There's no tell, and it works very well. When I do it the 'right' way (let it out and pull it straight back, like a fishing rod lol) my whole fighting stance, and maneuverability seems to go stale and I lose power. Which is the right way?

            7). I love hitting the bag so much, I hit it 20 - 30 minutes in the morning and can feel I've worked out and had enough. But when I'm laying, resting and watching tv at night time I feel that hunger to hit it again? Is this advisable to do? Is it safe? I don't so it at the moment, only work it in the mornings, once a day.

            8). I'm a tall guy and throwing hooks feel awkward to me at the moment. Unless I fire them out just the way my body feels right when I'm in at the bag, or taking a little step out, this way or that as my body sees fit naturally to do. I've tried quite a few youtube training videos I check them out. But nothing yet feels solid. Anyone recommend any great youtube video for the hook that you've seen, that really works? Both left lead and right infighting hooks I mean. As I'm told that's what they really are. Or any great practical advice from a a easier fighter that would work? I know they're not really basic fighting punches, but it's still nice to have a variety of things to work out on the bag. And just to e able to throw them coming on or out.

            That's probably all for now, damn I know that seem like a lot, but it's what was on my phones notepad as I've been working the bag, and just hitting these things down. These things have been kinda irking me. I have a bit of an analytical mind I suppose and it does go straight to enquiring things. I suppose as well you're never really gonna be happy if you find you're trying to do something you can't perfect.

            Any help would be appreciated, even if you just scroll past them and see you can help on one of the questions?

            Kindly,
            Tony.
            1 and 2. Popping versus pushing. Answer is to pop it... but, you must follow through if you want your maximum power output. What you want is a concussive blast, you want to really feel the impact.. follow through is a natural byproduct of that. I think your coaches were referring to this phenomenon where people have literally no concussiveness on their shots and yet commit to a fake follow through even though it's not a result of anything. It's actually added on more so than a culmination of flow.

            3. I find no use in clenching my fist tight prior to the release of a punch. There are some that ascribe to that though. For me, I hold my fist closed firm but natural (I wouldnt say loose) then clench the fist tighter right prior to impact. A forewarning though.. you must remember to clench your fist prior to impact or it could result in a injury of the wrist or hand. Some circumnavigate this I guess by keeping their fist clenched all the time.. but with practice clenching the fist right before impact becomes part of the muscle memory and little thought about.

            4. Don't arm punch..don't punch with the shoulders. Don't punch with any one thing. Join your body together into a living weapon, from the floor up. Let the hips be your guide and load your shots so they are fueled by the natural and powerful rotation of your body. Of note is the clenching fist thing, because it's advantageous in a right cross for instance to time the clenching of the fist, along with the rotation of the fist, along with the momentum of your weight, along with an exhalation of breath..to ALL coincide right before the..or upon the point of impact. This is a good punch.

            5. Overthinking form undermines natural flow... over emphasizing natural flow makes you sloppy. You must cultivate a balance.

            6. There are different types of right straights, with differing arcs and trajectories. Although to be classified as straights..all these differences do have to be more subtle.if you are referring to a slight clubbing motion at the end of a punch..that could be useful in certain situations. You do need to bring those hands back home..But I'm not going to discourage you from something that might just work for you. Perhaps it's a part of your particular follow through. REAL follow through not just tacked on.

            7. The heavy bag is an excellent medium for developing technique, footwork, endurance, and power. I've had 4 hour long sessions on the heavy bag.

            8.Practice your hook on the bag. Being a taller guy try lengthening your hook a bit to get full advantage of your long limbs. Coincide it with the movement of your hips and feet.



            Edit..oh and always keep stance discipline. Without your stance you are baseless.
            Last edited by Syf; 02-01-2016, 09:41 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Me too have some similar questions in mind about heavy bag. Subscribed to this thread. Thanks for posting this thread, Tony.

              Comment


              • #8
                whoever told you to "pop" the bag is a idiot.
                .
                Don't listen to this^.
                "Popping" refers to the sound made when you've optimized the speed and power of your strike along with the timing and accuracy. Pushing means that you are clenching the whole time. Clench or bulldoze your punch through the target and you will have no speed and will tire quickly. Shadowboxing helps keep you from pushing because you can't rely on the bag to keep you from losing balance or hurting your arm as you muscle your way through a punch. When you see guys in street fights swinging like goofballs, off balance, over extending, and slow, that's muscling your way through a punch. When you see Mayweather KO Hatton, that's a perfect example of the type of punch that pops. It's fast, well timed, and he puts muscle on it at the moment of impact.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Redd Foxx View Post
                  Don't listen to this^.
                  "Popping" refers to the sound made when you've optimized the speed and power of your strike along with the timing and accuracy. Pushing means that you are clenching the whole time. Clench or bulldoze your punch through the target and you will have no speed and will tire quickly. Shadowboxing helps keep you from pushing because you can't rely on the bag to keep you from losing balance or hurting your arm as you muscle your way through a punch. When you see guys in street fights swinging like goofballs, off balance, over extending, and slow, that's muscling your way through a punch. When you see Mayweather KO Hatton, that's a perfect example of the type of punch that pops. It's fast, well timed, and he puts muscle on it at the moment of impact.
                  Redd where I agree with you is never to throw a punch that will throw you badly off balance in the event of a miss. Balance is important and key.

                  Also I agree not to muscle a punch... muscle is secondary to aligning different elements of the body's movement into a cohesive effort with an explosive focal point.

                  Where I differ is in looking up to May for my heavy bag work. Problem with him is he rarely commits to a shot. He's so sharp and precise that that mitigates his need for follow through. Not everyone likes to fight like that. Yes committing leaves you more open, but also gives you more bang for your buck. May is so eager to reset his defense that it often hinders his commitment to a punch, unless we go all the way back. But even so, May was always a cobra, more so than a lion or bear. He also goes relatively light on the bag to preserve his brittle hands.

                  It just depends what people want to do. They won't develop stone crushing one punch ko type of power hitting the bag like Mayweather, as good as he is.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AddiX View Post
                    Punch through the bag, whoever told you to "pop" the bag is a idiot.

                    You can switch back and forth once you get good, and want to train punching and boxing at different speeds. In that case than taking some power off your punches is acceptable.

                    But punching through the bag should always be the main objective.

                    As my trainer use to say, "were not trying to hit people in the head, we want to find out how far we can push our hand through it.
                    'Popping' the bag is good punch technique and isnt referring to light shots. It's referring to the snap. It's the correct thing to do. You're actually much more likely to push your shots if you try to punch through the bag too much. That's what pushing the bag is about, along with extending your arm after you've hit it and literally pushing the bag further.

                    You should punch through a little bit, but not too much, otherwise you will end up pushing or losing the snap on your shots.

                    Comment

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