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Daily Bread Mailbag: Canelo-GGG, Hopkins, Spence, Hurd-Charlo

By Stephen "Breadman" Edwards

The Daily Bread Mailbag returns with Stephen "Breadman" Edwards tackling topics such as Canelo vs. Golovkin, the middleweight division, Jarrett Hurd vs. Jermell Charlo, career of Bernard Hopkins, Errol Spence, and much more.

I have a different type of question. I would like to know what is the proper pay percentages a team should take from a fighter? I also want you to get into if you can on how a team should be structured as far as who does what, who travels etc. I know a few fighters and this may seem small but it’s actually chaotic on the teams that I know personally.

Bread’s Response: Percentages vary from team to team. In some teams you have a manger that will take 33%-40%. On these teams the manager usually pays everyone, the head trainer 7%-10%, assistant trainer 3%-5%, strength coach (agreed flat rate), Cutman (flat rate or 2%-3%) depending on the purse. Then you have miscellaneous people like social media branding, cooks etc. They all also have a flat rate. I’ve seen this as the scenario often and it works because the fighter comes home with 60% of the purse.

But in order for the manager to deserve 33%-40%, he usually has to give the fighter a big signing bonus or pay a stipend until the fighter makes a certain amount. From my experience what kills the fighter is if he takes extra money from investors on the “side” that are recoupable monies. Investors have a right to want their money back. I have seen fighters come home with 20 cents on the dollar because of what they borrow before fights.

From my perspective the best case scenario for a fighter is to get incorporated so he can write off as much as possible. Pay the head trainer 10%-15% depending on the trainer’s responsibilities. Assistant trainer 5% or an agreed upon flat rate. Manager/advisor 10%-15% depending on their investment and resources. Often times the head trainers makes the determination on the opponents so they are in essence acting as a manger also. Take note of that. The fighters should also have someone on his team to solicit sponsorships. Sponsorships are the best supplemental income a fighter can have as far as boxing. In fact sponsorships can be so important, promoters and managers often time secretly get sponsorships because of fighters and the fighters don’t even know. A fighter can pay his whole team on sponsorship money and keep his actual fight purse to himself if done right.

Strength & Conditioning coaches and dieticians are a complex thing to me. Some of these S&C coaches don’t add anything except extra muscle that sucks up the endurance and speed. About 15% of them are really good and they also play personal assistant to the fighter as well as coach. They check his weight, give him his vitamins and shakes etc. I think overall they are overrated but individually they can be important. Dieticians can be important but at the end of the day it comes down to a fighter’s discipline and intelligence. If a fighter can’t discipline himself to eat 5 small meals a day, take his supplements and drink a gallon of water/day. Then he has to pay someone to make him do it. So that’s up to the fighter if he wants to create that extra expense. If a fighter lives with his mother, wife or girlfriend, a dietician is not as needed as it is with the fighters who don’t….

A great team allows a fighter to just fight. Fighters are exhausted, they take punches for a living and they have to lose and gain weight properly which is draining. Most cannot multi task. A keen eye can see a well put together fighter’s team. I can look at fighters like Errol Spence and Jarret Hurd and see they have great teams and structures around them. Their teams have nice sweat suits, time sensitive t shirts for their fights, good sponsors and everyone seems to know their rolls. I don’t know what the purse breakdowns are but I can tell their structure is tight.

I can tell when a fighter was raised properly with his family. I can tell the fighters who have to venture out on their own. I can tell the fighter’s who’s significant others play an important role in their lives. I’m not suggesting that fighters who don’t have the prototypical family structure do not have great boxing structures. That would not be accurate. I can just tell when that structure comes from a mentor/trainer/manager or when it comes from the family. Fighters have to find strong, trustworthy resourceful guidance from someone on their team and it doesn’t matter if it’s actual family or from a mentor.

The fighters who treat their team members good and are willing to invest in themselves are typically the most successful. Cheap fighters only cheat themselves at the end of the day.

A good manager/advisor should be more loyal to the fighter than they are to the promoter. A manager who is loyal to the promoter cannot negotiate in good faith on the fighter’s behalf. The trainer is very unique. He has to be a parent figure, mentor and paramilitary leader all in one. A good trainer/fighter relationship depends on trust and respect. It has to be mutual and the fighter has to listen. His life and future accomplishments are in the trainer’s hands more so than anyone’s. Everyone on the team has to earn trust, be humble and the fighter has to trust everyone. A fighter who needs to be a part of everything and is always worried and busy bodying around always loses in the big spots. He’s spreading himself too thin to concentrate on just boxing. And the reason he’s spreading himself thin is because he either does not trust his team or he’s too cheap to hire people do certain things. Fighters are notoriously cheap and often want people to do things for them for free.

In contrast the biggest mistake I think fighter’s make is employing people who serve no value and taking money early in their careers and then owing money late. Unless you are all time great special and have 15 year longevity with no real drop off, then taking too much recoupable monies will hurt you not help you. It’s nothing wrong with being hungry when you start out. Hunger has always been a good thing for a fighter.

In a perfect world a fighter should be able to come home with 70% of his purse. In an even more perfect world 80%. Boxing is not a perfect world and most fighters don’t come home with that much money unfortunately.

As far as who can or should travel to the fights I have seen this become an issue also. For preliminary fighters the promoter usually allows 3 or 4 people to travel including the fighter. Usually it’s the fighter, the trainer and the assistant trainer. They usually pick up a local cutman. As the fighter progresses the promoter allows 4. Elite talents are always allowed to bring more people on the promoter’s dime. Rarely is a fighter allowed to bring more than 5 or 6 people. As far as who should travel it should be in order of importance. If a fighter needs more than the “allowed” he should pay for them to travel.

Fighters who make over 6 figures have to determine what the importance of the extra people are. I’ve seen some very uncomfortable situations occur because of this. I’ve seen cases where fighters ask their boxing team to share rooms with their family and friends who don’t really serve a purpose. I’ve seen cases where team members are asked to room together. Personally I don’t think this is fair to the core team. The trainer, assistant trainer, cutman and manager/advisor shouldn’t have to share a room and bathroom unless they want to. This may seem like a petty issue to people outside of boxing but I know for a fact that this has broken teams up. It will let a team member know exactly who the fighter thinks is important.

I hope I was able to help.

canelo-golovkin-new-york (8)_1

Now that GGG vs Canelo II is made what do you think of the middleweight landscape? Do you think they should fight for the RING championship? We have plenty of challengers to start a middleweight Golden Age. I love your picks and your honesty but I do have one bone to pick with you. You overrate Demetrius Andrade. You always talk about how talented he is and how he will be a handful for any of the other top guys. But you never talk about how he seems to always having promotional issues. Contracts don’t last forever come on Bread. Andrade is out of the mix because he wants to be. His best win is a split decision over average Vanes Martirosyan and you think he can hang with GGG. He ducked Charlo then he shows up at their fights. I don’t buy it. I know you would interject him in the middleweight landscape answer so I had to interject my thoughts before you. Thoughts.

Bread’s Response: I think middleweight can be in the midst of a Golden Era but I don’t know if it will be. Besides GGG and Canelo, middleweight has Jermall Charlo, Danny Jacobs, BJ Saunders, Ryota Murata, Sergiy Deveryanchenko and your favorite fighter Demetrius Andrade. I don’t think many of these fighters will mix and match because they’re either champions or high ranking contenders and they don’t want to lose their status and rankings unless they hit a lottery fight vs GGG or Canelo. There lies the problem. I just don’t see one of the “other” guys risking anything big unless it’s against GGG or Canelo.

I just hope we get a definitive winner of GGG vs Canelo. Another close or controversial decision will lead to a rubber match and the rubber match will have the other guys still waiting around for the BIG ONE. Yes I think GGG vs Canelo should be for the RING title.

As for me overrating Demetrius Andrade. I disagree. I have never said Andrade was the best or most accomplished. I’ve never said he has a great resume or fought or beaten great fighters. Whenever I’m asked about him I talk about his talent and pedigree. And yes I do believe he would be a tough fight for anyone in the division. Survey those who you think are experts and ask them how Andrade will do against the middleweight field. I’m not suggesting he will beat everyone, I’m just saying he will hold his own. You actually make some good points that I won’t argue with. I just think you’re misguided when it comes to my opinion about Andrade. Hopefully Andrade gets a big fight this year because he’s missed some big years of his prime not fighting. Let’s see what happens and how he matches up.

Bread,

the 'boxing is dead or dying' banter has been finally put to bed. what are your thoughts on this years fights and scheduled fights? we're midway through the year and i think 2018 is turning out to be a great year for boxing. match ups off the top of my head:

santacruz v mares
wilder v ortiz
parker v joshua
groves v eubank
linares v lomachenko
WBSS

then fights being made:
garcia v easter
kovalev v alvarez
garcia v porter
GGG v canelo (just been made)
wilder v joshua (apparently ready to go)
usyk v gassiev (should happen)

off the top of my head i can not name a better year, what do you think? and are there other years that can compete? to me this has to be the best year ive seen in my 20yrs of following the sport.

Bread’s Response: Boxing is not dead. 2018 has been a solid year. But no way bro, this is not the best year of the last 20. I can think of about 7 years that were better since 1998. But I’m glad you’re optimistic.

What's up Breadman,

Shout out to you man. Spot on predictions for this weekends fights, literally everything you said was true that's crazy.

As a fan of Jermell Charlo, He did look sloppy at times in the Trout fight. I personally think it has alot to do with Trout's style but also the fact that he let the boo's of the crowd get to him (terrible decisionmaking to put this fight in front of a all-mexican crowd in LA before Santa Cruz Mares they want a firefight and nothing less) and he tried to crowd-please by loading up for big shot and looking anxious at times. He also showed extreme explosiveness it was almost scary to see how explosive he looked at times. In my opinion Trout was just in survival mode for much of the fight and with a slick guy like Trout it makes everything look worse.

The fight with Hurd looks imminent with Hurd calling Charlo out for the next fight after the Trout fight. Hurd can't get Kell Brook so I'm guessing he is moving on from that and looking towards Charlo after the sloppy performance. I think that will be a fascinating fight of the year type fight, A true 50/50 fight maybe 55/45 Charlo in my eyes. How do you see that fight potentially going?

The thing that would worry me as a Hurd fan is his lack of head movement and defense, it's actually pretty alarming to me that he eats big shots like that. With the velocity and explosiveness that Charlo punches with now it could be a messy night for Hurd. But in fairness, Hurd is a huge guy for 154 he could walk Charlo down like everyone else and slowly dismantle him. How do you see this one?

Bread’s Response: I don’t think it was a bad decision for Charlo to fight in LA. He lives in LA and he’s turned into a big ko puncher. Trout has only been stopped once but he’s been dropped and hurt often. So the thought was Charlo would “youtube” Trout. It didn’t work out that way. And the fans booed him. It happens. Fights are won in the ring and not on paper. You have to give props to Trout for not allowing himself to be knocked out. Charlo darn sure tried.

Charlo vs Hurd, or Hurd vs Charlo is one of the most talked about fights in boxing. It’s building. I think it guarantees fireworks. Before the Trout fight I think it was 55/45 in favor of Charlo. Not anymore. It’s 50/50 now in my opinion. Charlo is a tremendous physical presence but it seems he is a little caught in between styles. Just remember for 90% of his career he was a mover and a 1-2 puncher. Now he’s a seek and destroy come forward fighter. So at times vs tough competition he won’t look as comfortable. But you have to give him credit, he finds a way to win. I will be interested to see “how” he fights Hurd. Will he move or will he attempt to push Hurd back.

I think it’s an even fight. But Hurd seems to be so relaxed and at peace. In the midst of chaos, Hurd is calm. This allows you to think and react under the pressure and not fatigue. It’s an advantage that Hurd has over the high strung Charlo.

Whenever I see a fight being proposed I think of a historical comparison. It doesn’t always predict an exact outcome but it gives me an indicator. The two fights I think of when I look at Hurd vs Charlo is Holyfield vs Tyson I and Simon Brown vs Tyrone Trice I.

For those who haven’t seen Brown vs Trice I for the welterweight title check it out on youtube. It was a flat out barn burner. Trice and Tyson are the fast starting, big punching, high strung fighters. Holyfield and Brown are the calm, relaxed, solid all around guys. In each fight Holyfield and Brown had more success the later the fight went. I don’t have a pick for this fight yet, but those are the fights I think of when I think about Hurd vs Charlo. 

Great Mailbag as always but you answered a question that really highlights the problem with boxing today.  You were asked what are the best three divisions and you mentioned Junior Middleweight which has three champions under 30 and all undefeated.  My question is this, "How is that possible?" Shouldn't these guys be fighting each other and doesn't the fact we have 3 undefeated champions diminish championships?

Marlon
Washington, DC

Bread’s Response: I think you need to give them sometime. Hurd unified vs Lara in his 2nd defense. Munguia just won the title and Charlo and Hurd are on a collision course. I believe Hurd vs Charlo will happen soon.

We have had undefeated champions in the same division before. It’s only a big deal if they stay in the same division for 2 or more years and don’t fight. It’s early now. Let’s see how it plays out.

Peace to you and your family king.
Hope all is well.

My question is how to you rate these fighters skill wise and how they would fit I'm to todays boxing field. 

Jersey Joe Walcott. Hector Camacho. Marlon Starlon. Wilfredo Benitez.
Mythical Matchups
Jersey Joe Vs Usyk (being around the same size)
Hector Camacho vs Sean Porter
Marlon Starlon vs Keith Thurmon
Benitez vs Spence

Bread’s Response: I rate Walcott, Camacho, Starling and Benitez as A level fighters skillwise.

Walcott would probably be a lightheavyweight and he would probably be top 3 in the world if not the best. Camacho would be a great fighter today at junior lightweight and lightweight. He would be the best at 130 and him and Loma would have to battle at 135 for the top spot. Starling would be a serious threat to any of the top guys at 147. I would favor him to beat everyone not named Spence or Crawford. Benitez would be a something. He would be the best fighter at 140. Top 3 at 147 and the best at 154. Benitez was special.

Usyk is a bad style for Jersey Joe. I say Usyk by decision. But I would like to see him face more styles before I can say it definitely.

Camacho is too small for Porter. Camacho started out at 130 and he wasn’t a great fighter by the time he got to 147. So Porter by deicison.

I would pick Starling over Thurman in a tight fight. Starling is criminally underrated. Just to think the 5’8 natural 147 Starling was able to EARN and majority decision loss vs a prime 6’1 Michael Nunn. Nunn is one of the more difficult head to head match ups of the last 25 years at middleweight.

I can’t call Benitez vs Spence. I need to see more of Spence. Right now I would take Benitez by decision but it’s not concrete. Spence looks to be building a special legacy and considering he’s already being mentioned in hypothetical match ups should tell you he’s on his way.

Hello Breadman, excellent knowledgeable mailbag as usual.

My question is, how important is a big weight cut?  Do the pros outweigh the cons?

The fighters who cut a lot of weight just seem more and more to me these days, maybe it's always been the case, I don't know.  I remember having a conversation with my Brother about this a few years ago when Floyd and Pacquiao were #1 and #2 and to our knowledge they both seemed to walk around at not too far off their fighting weights. In my head that seems like the better, safer idea but just by how many fighters do it I must be wrong??

Thanks Mat from Stoke.

Bread’s Response: My estimation is 95% of the world class fighters cut 20lbs. When I say “world class” say the fighters who are in the top 10 of the RING or Transnational Rankings, cut at least 20lbs. What I mean by 20lbs is they are 20lbs over their division weight at some point if they aren’t training for a fight. 

It’s very important. Cutting the weight then rehydrating back up to a functional weight in order to fight is probably the most important thing in boxing in this era. Because fighters come down so far in weight, food and liquid intake after the weigh in the most important thing in the 36 hours before fight time. Fighters have to get back to a functional weight or they won’t be as strong, durable or endured.

The intelligent fighters have it down to a science. The not so intelligent fighters don’t. The intelligent ones know how important it is to get the nutrients into them and they know when to stop so they won’t be full or bloated getting into the ring. The not so intelligent ones don’t have a plan on how to put the nutrients back. You can see them a mile away. Just watch them at weigh ins. Watch where they go to eat. Then watch how much they weigh the night of the fight. If you walk around at 155lbs but you’re a lightweight. And you rehydrate to say 142lbs then you’re not very intelligent and you will compromise your performance. Your body is not used to functioning so low in weight.

Mayweather and Pacquiao were anomalies for this era. But at one point in time they were the norm. They weren’t huge guys for 147 but they had all time great skill, speed, timing, stamina and both were extremely physically strong. Strength is not always weight although it can be closely related.

Most fighters lose something when they cut 20lbs. Even the best ones only get about 90% of their strength back. Mayweather and Pacquiao didn’t lose anything plus they were better than everyone else so they still kept the advantage. The reason why more guys don’t do it like Floyd and Manny did is because they simply aren’t good enough to give up 15lbs on fight night and still be successful.

You also have to realize that there are tricks that work as far as weight cutting. Sometimes the tricks are legal often times illegal. Fighters use steam rooms, baths, supplements and PEDs to cut it weight. It depends on the fighter and his team.

If you can build yourself up to be extremely strong 20lbs over your division weight and then you are able to cut the weight and still be extremely strong and keep your stamina then you’re winning in boxing. You have figured out how to be successful in this era. Usually that’s a genetic thing or a resource thing. That’s a PRO.

If you cut 20lbs but you’re not drinking the proper amount of water, or taking the proper amount of nutrients and all you do is wear a sauna suit and run or sit in a steam room. It’s a con and you will eventually lose and lose badly. That fighter is cutting into muscle and resistance and that’s not good. Water, fish and plant based foods are the easiest thing to burn off.

In my opinion the most important thing as far as cutting weight is the diet. There is food you can eat that is easier to burn off. Then there are foods that are nearly impossible to burn off. Discipline is still the key.

Bread,

I just read today's mailbag. As usual, it was very enlightening. Thanks for doing it how you do it. It's the best weekly write up boxing fanatics can consume.
Dan Grabowski, Madison CT

Bread’s Response: Thanks bro appreciate that. It seems my mailbag is coming out every Saturday these days. So stay on the look out and keep supporting.

Breadman,

Quick questions regarding B-Hop:

Which half of his career was better pre Trinidad or Post?

And who wins head to head young B-Hop or old?
 
Thanks

Bread’s Response: Great Question! Bernard Hopkins’s greatest night was against Felix Trinidad. It’s his apex performance than any historian will use to show that Hopkins is an all time great who is top 5 or 6 ever at 160. But your question is for me to split his career in half and tell you which one is best.

I would say post Trinidad career was the best. As weird as that sounds I think it is. Post Trinidad he beat Oscar De La Hoya, Winky Wright, Kelly Pavlik, Antonio Tarver, Jean Pascal and Tavoris Cloud. He also won the light heavyweight title on 3 separate occasions and he unified. His competition was much stronger at 175 than it was at 160.

Here is the crazy part about your question. He was a better fighter pre Trinidad. But his career was better post Trinidad. I relate Hopkins’s career by his nicknames. First he was the Executioner, that Hopkins was a seek and destroy guy with a big right hand and cagey moves and tactics. Joe Lipsey was the highlight. Then at some point after Lipsey he started to evolve into BHOP. Trinidad and Glen Johnson were the highlights of Bhop. Bhop could still punch but his mission was to outbox. As time went by he became the Alien at 175. Although most of his great victories were at 175 he was all boxer and tactical fighter at 175. I don’t think he ever scored another ko after he moved up to 175 in 2006. So from my estimation BHOP was the best. The Bernard from say 97 until he moved up to light heavyweight.

Do you think it’s a misconception that black fighters are not exciting or black fighters don’t have fan bases? I hear a trainer like Abel Sanchez make that comment about black fighters not being exciting and many in the media say black fighters don’t have fan bases. But Errol Spence seems to dispel that myth.

What are your thoughts?

Bread’s Response: Errol Spence is a franchise in Dallas. I think Errol Spence will be a PPV fighter and I can see him earning 40 million dollars total before his career is over. He has the perfect style to showcase and he lives in the perfect city for him. Let me explain.

The style thing is important because you can’t showcase every fighter. Even some great fighters don’t showcase well because they aren’t dynamic in one area where the crowd can relate to them easily. For example Shane Mosley was fast and powerful. It was easy for HBO to showcase him. Vernon Forest was skilled and well rounded. But we didn’t know good Forest was until he fought Mosley. The same exact thing can be said about Trinidad and Hopkins.

Errol Spence has it all. He has the clean cut look but he’s not a square. You can tell he would be able to date nice looking women if he wasn’t famous. He’s a hard puncher, who fights in a destructive manner. He’s not a super smack talker but he is confident and he puts fighters on notice. He has a southern drawl but he speaks well and he’s gracious. He’s also in boxing’s glamour division. I think Spence is the best prospect turned champion considering all things that Al Haymon and PBC has ever had.

I never agree with generalized statements. Spence is exciting and he is marketable. But Terence Crawford sells out Omaha, Andre Ward sold out Oakland, Devon Alexander and Cory Spinks sold out St. Louis. Ward, Alexander and Spinks were not big punchers or ko artist. But they still had support. In the right city, with the right amount of effort black fighters can sell it’s proven. They may not have the natural support from most of the big cities but it’s been proven it can be done.

From my observations I think it’s harder to sell black fighters who are from bigger cities. New York, Philadelphia, Houston, LA for example produce a plethora of black fighters. But for some reason those cities don’t gather the support of black fighters, the way what I call BIG towns do. Just think about it. I don’t know exactly why the BIG cities don’t support black fighters like the BIG towns do. I suspect envious energy and preoccupation.

I think the glove has to fit on the hand. The fighter has to have the “IT” factor with his personality or he has to simply be so good he wins all the time. If you notice elite and star fighters all hang around each other. If you notice the stars, (actors, musicians and athletes), they buddy up with great fighters. Not B level fighters. It’s just the way it is. Rick Ross, 50 cent and Mark Wahlberg don’t befriend fringe contender fighters. They befriend Terence Crawford, Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao.

The generalized comments are irresponsible. Black fighters can sell if they are promoted correctly. Pernell Whitaker was promoted in Norfolk and he sold. Evander Holyfield was promoted in Atlanta and he sold. Ray Leonard was promoted in the DMV and he sold. Thomas Hearns was promoted in Detroit and he sold. In today’s time Crawford, Spence and Ward were all recently promoted in their hometowns. All sold well at home and all could fight their butts off. But not everyone of them was an exciting ko artist.

As for the exciting factor. I think that is an overstatement. It’s not a myth just an overstatement. Black fighters often times have a speed and athleticism advantage. So if the goal is to win the fight, often times the black fighters will just win and not go overboard with taking chances. I personally believe the win is the most important thing and to impress is next. Impressing is important but it shouldn’t trump winning. Some fighters like Paul Williams got criticized for not fighting smart, because he didn’t use his perceived advantages. I would rather be Andre Ward than Paul Williams, no disrespect to Paul Williams.

Adrien Broner is another fighter who gets criticized for not using his boxing ability. I actually agree with this criticism but still in all Broner slugs it out and tries to be exciting. No one compliments Broner for being a bulldog and standing in the pocket. My question is I often see black fighters get criticized for not using their god given talents when they slug too much.  But if they take chances and lose then they get set aside and criticized for losing and not being smart. It’s not an easy perception to decipher.

I won’t have a pity party for black fighters but you asked me and I’m giving an honest assessment of the topic. I think anyone who makes generalized critiques have to be careful. The Charlo Brothers, Anthony Joshua, Deontay Wilder, Terence Crawford, Tank Davis, Errol Spence, Regis Prograis and Danny Jacobs are all exciting black fighters who knock people out. Everytime a boxers decides to box and give some movement he gets criticized by the fans of his opponent, which includes media, or his opponents’ team because they couldn’t knock him out. That’s not fair. If you’re a killer cut the ring off and ko him. There is a difference between boxing and running or stinking the joint out. I personally enjoy boxer punchers although the entertainment value is not always the same. I don’t mind a seeing a fighter box to a win. Terence Crawford does it as well as anyone. What I don’t like to see is a stinker like say a John Ruiz. I respect all fighters but watching a Ruiz fight is tough for me.

I also don’t like to see a talented fighter, fight an overmatched opponent but he won’t step on it to get the ko to take his career to the next level. In fairness I do think some black fighters do this and it effects their marketability and perception. I’m not talking about being smart and safe in a 50/50 tough fight vs a puncher. I’m talking about showcase fights like what Errol Spence and Terence Crawford just had. Crawford and Spence both stepped on it and took out their overmatched opponents like they were supposed to. The fighter who has that kind of skill separation in a match up that chooses to play it safe should be criticized. It shouldn’t matter if they are black, white or candy stripe. I hope I was able to help.

Is Errol Spence the best body puncher in boxing? My goodness I don’t know if I’ve ever seen a young fighter commit so much to the body. Who would you say Spence reminds you of? Who are the best body punchers in boxing?

Bread’s Response: Errol Spence has a great case for the best body puncher in boxing. He’s absolutely brutal to the body. I think I would say yes. I think GGG and Monster Inoue hit the hardest to the body for one shot. Both of their left hooks to the liver are life changing. But Spence never neglects the body. He’s always digging it in there. He reminds me of Mike McCallum in that way. McCallum didn’t have a famous or eye catching shot to the body like Chavez and McClellan did. But he worked the body better than anyone. He always stuck shots to the body throughout the entire fight. Spence has a two fisted body attack also. Southpaws usually do. Spence brings his right hook around the side and it usually cracks the ribs or hits the kidney. Then his left hand he can bring around the side to the liver or he can shovel it up the middle and hit either the solar plexus or the liver. Spence’s contemporaries are fortunate that this is not a 15 round era. Very few would be able to last 15 rounds with Errol Spence.

There will come a time when Spence will not be the most skilled fighter in the ring. It happens in boxing. But his body punching will pull him through that time because he understands how important it is.

Let’s see Spence reminds me of……..3 fighters mixed into one. His physicality , physical strength, south paw jab and workrate remind me of a young Hagler. His constant body work reminds me of McCallum. And believe it or not they way he digs to the body from the southpaw stance reminds me of Pernell Whitaker. Whitaker was a tremendous body puncher. One of the best ever. But his accolades get misappropriated. Whitaker is looked at as a runner and stinker but he was anything but. He just wasn’t a ko artist.
10 Best Body Punchers:
1. Errol Spence
2. GGG
3. Monster Inoue
4. Murat Gassiev
5. Vasyl Lomachenko
6. Sergey Kovalev
7. Terence Crawford
8. Josh Taylor
9.Badou Jack
10. Adonis Stevenson

Now that Spence has taken care of his mandatory, he can get the big fights. How do you see the welterweight scene playing out until Spence and Crawford fight?

Bread’s Response: I think Spence’s handlers toughest job will be finding him opponents until he can fight Crawford. I think opponents will have to be created in the interim. Keith Thurman the most accomplished welterweight that the PBC has is inactive. Even if he does come back this year, he will need some time to shake off the rust and fight Errol Spence. Danny Garcia and Shawn Porter are the next two. They are going to fight each other. People claim the winner will fight Spence. But the winner doesn’t HAVE to fight Spence. It will be a unification and not a mandatory. Unification fights are a choice. Mandatories are an option.

Spence looks like a junior middleweight as far as physicality. The fighter that fights Errol Spence that doesn’t HAVE to fight him, whomever that shall be is a real fighter. Literally no one HAS to box but I’m talking figuratively. If a fighter has made good money and has options I just don’t see them fighting Spence. I do believe Crawford will but you always have that line that will need to be crossed and that’s never easy. By the way if I’m Crawford I go after Spence right now. If he gets a 3 or 4 more fights of experience he could enter into that great fighter’s apex that Crawford happens to be in now at 30.

How will the scene logically play out? I see Crawford fighting the Mean Machine and/or Jose Benavidez. That should take him into the spring of next year.

On Spence’s side of the block I see Danny Garcia vs Shawn Porter as a close competitive fight. The winner will be off for at least 6 months. I see Devon Alexander vs Andre Berto as another good fight. If Alexander wins I can see him fighting Spence. Berto has made lots of money in his career. Boxing is a business. I just can’t see a fighter who is not on the verge of the HOF, with plenty of money taking a fight where they will be a 10-1 under dog in this era. This is just not the era for that.

So let’s say Spence will keep busy with a Yordenis Ugas or Jessie Vargas. It’s a good time to be one those guys because you can really get paid because no one wants to fight Spence. Spence may also think about moonlighting at 154 or a close catchweight like Roy Jones did at 168 before he officially moved up. There are some really good contenders at 154 who can give Spence a tougher fight than most of the welterweights.

There is only one prospect at 147 by the name of Jaron Ennis who is now 20-0 who has the talent and size to face Spence within the next 2 years. As they saying goes it’s not always who is front of you but sometimes it can be the guy behind you that is most dangerous. Ennis just doesn’t have the experience yet. But he looks to me to be an uber talent every bit as talented as Spence was coming through the ranks. Ennis is about 21 yrs old and usually American kids don’t fight for titles that early at 147, 154,160 or 168. But trust me in about a year he will gain momentum and people will be able to see he’s a real challenge to Spence. Anything can happen in boxing but be on the look out for Ennis to challenge Crawford and Spence for supremacy 147 by the end of 2019 if he doesn’t take an L or have uneven performance where his team has to hold him back. In 18 months I expect Ennis to have 4 to 6 fights and be about 24-0 to 26-0. I know the boxing public hasn’t heard of Ennis yet but if he gets a tv spot or gets to be in a high profile camp as a sparring partner, they will. I’ve seen him up close and personal and he’s as good as fighter in the gym as I’ve ever seen. If it translates over to live fights then whoa…!

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User Comments and Feedback (Register For Free To Comment) Comment by techdude69 on 06-23-2018

Always a ****en good read by the Breadman. The dude knows his ****!

Comment by Afi23 on 06-23-2018

[QUOTE=SteveM;18884966]Is Sanchez racist? I find it difficult to believe he would have said that about black fighters not being exciting. Whether he said it or the letter-writer just was trolling it's a stupid lazy idea. Prime Tyson was so damn…

Comment by ShoulderRoll on 06-23-2018

Canelo, Mikey Garcia, and Roman Gonzalez all belong on the list of best body punchers in boxing.

Comment by sammybee on 06-23-2018

Bread never answered the winner of Charlo vs Hurd fight.

Comment by Gillie on 06-23-2018

Spence is in every question, article, post and thread. This reminds me of the Donald Curry era.

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