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Build Health: Cut Through The Calcium Hype

The initial success of penicillin generated an assumption which has stuck with us as a cultural belief in the Quick Technological Fix. That assumption is:

A single variable can be divided out from all other variables, tested for its result, and it will prevent or promote disease.

Most people have come to believe nutrition is divisible, and that a single substance will maintain vibrant health. The touting of calcium for the degenerative disease osteoporosis provides an excellent example.

Every day the media, acting as proxy for the milk lobby, sells calcium as a magic bullet. Has it worked? Definitely for sales of milk; but for American health it has been a disaster.

Brainwashed by magic bullet thinking, so-called "experts" tell us to take more and more calcium. But calcium is antagonistic to magnesium. And the American diet is woefully short in magnesium.

When you load up your system with excess calcium, you shut down magnesium's ability to activate thyrocalcitonin, a hormone that under normal circumstances would send calcium to your bones.

Next, your excess calcium proceeds to wander around creating all sorts of mischief in blood vessels, joints, kidneys and eyes.

Why is it that supposedly nutritionally disadvantaged countries, with low calcium intake but enough magnesium in their soils, exhibit little if any evidence of osteoporosis?

Because the people in these countries do not consume large amounts of calcium that antagonize or work against magnesium, or zinc, and a plethora of other minerals required by our metabolic enzyme systems.

"Experts" do not tell us that in living systems minerals work interdependently as a team.

In 1993 medical researchers claimed that calcium was a magic bullet that could help prevent osteoporosis. They told us dairy products, such as milk, provide one of the best sources of calcium.

Every day the media gives us a dose of that finding.

In 1997, however, medical researchers claimed there was no evidence consuming dairy products prevents osteoporosis. How so?

They decided dairy products are high in sulfur amino acids that lead to calcium depletion.

Has the media told you this? No.

And they are not going to tell you anything about this because the milk lobby advertising budget helps finance media payrolls.

Think about what awaits all those poor folks who have been fooled by the myth that taking lots of calcium will save their bones.

About The Author

Bill Quesnell, author of "Minerals: The Essential Link to Health," is a health educator and Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation member. He helps people recover energy and vitality. Subscribe to FREE monthly ezine, 'Where Health Comes From' at Write Bill at 5039 Voltaire St. #3, San Diego, CA 92107 See critical reviews & 15 harmful health myths at


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