Bookmark Website  | Free Registration  | The Team
The Lounge  | Champions  | The Wire |  Schedule |  Audio  |  Arcade  |  The Top Ten  |  Historical  |  Email  |  Video

5 Ways to Get the Best Out of Radishes


They sit left behind on relish trays. They're often by-passed ingrocery store refrigerator shelves. Dad and Grandpa usually eatthem but later complain of belching them up. The poor radish hasgotten a bum rap. There are at least five different varieties;but for now, the popular, red globe variety will be spotlighted.They are a great source of vitamin C and an excellent low caloriesnack (only 12 calories in a half cup of radishes). Radishes areroot vegetables that are classified in the cabbage and mustardfamily, thus their strong taste.

Most people eat them raw, with a little salt. If you'd like yourradishes to be a little crispier and a little less sharp intaste, put them in ice water for a couple hours before you planto eat them. There are also a number of ways to cook them. Boila half inch of water, add the sliced radishes, and then coverand simmer until tender, adding more water if necessary. Cookfive to ten minutes. To microwave, place a half pound of slicedradishes in a microwave safe dish with 1 tablespoon of water orbroth. Cook for approximately four minutes.

If the taste of raw radishes is a little too pungent for some,try them steamed. Their bright red skin will turn pink on steamedradishes. The easiest way to steam them is to place wholeradishes in a vegetable steamer and cook over boiling water untilbarely tender. Cook approximately eight to twelve minutes. Another way to prepare our friend, the red radish, is to stir frythem. Sliced radishes combine well with other vegetables andmeat in stir-fries. Don't over cook them or they'll become mushy.Cook approximately three to five minutes.

As Cliff Claven would say, "It's a little known fact that ?"radishes were first cultivated thousands of years ago in China,then in Egypt and Greece. In Greece they were so highly regardedthat gold replicas were made. (Now that's some serious radishlovers!)

So the next time you walk past radishes in the grocery store orat the market, back track a few steps and pick up a bunch or two.Or better yet, plant some in your garden this year. Radishesare one of the very first vegetables ready for harvest in thespring. They will in turn, ready your soil for other veggies! Give these little guys a chance again.

The information contained in this article is for educational purposes only and is not intended to medically diagnose, treat or cure any disease. Consult a health care practitioner before beginning any health care program.

Emily Clark is editor at Lifestyle Health News and Medical Health News where you can find the most up-to-date advice and information on many medical, health and lifestyle topics.


MORE RESOURCES:

Warning: fopen(http://news.google.com/news?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLG,GGLG:2005-22,GGLG:en&q=Nutrition&output=rss) [function.fopen]: failed to open stream: HTTP request failed! HTTP/1.0 503 Service Unavailable in /home/boxing/public_html/nutrition/inc/rss.inc on line 81
could not open XML input