Bookmark Website  | Free Registration  | The Team
The Lounge  | Champions  | The Wire |  Schedule |  Audio  |  Arcade  |  The Top Ten  |  Historical  |  Email  |  Video

What Everybody Ought to Know About Food Additives


Every day we are bombarded with information about food products that are healthy, all natural, have no artificial ingredients, no preservatives, low fat, no fat, no cholesterol, sugar free, vitamin fortified and provide 100% of your daily vitamin requirements. Are these foods as healthy as the advertising tries to make us believe they are?

Let's look at the facts. There are more than 3000 different chemicals added to our food. The company that wants to produce the chemicals or use the chemicals in the foods they produce usually does the testing for safety. Safety testing has only been done for individual additives, not for combinations of additives. Nobody knows the effects of the many different additives used in the thousands of different combinations. To make matters worse, because of political pressure, the FDA allows manufacturers to add small amounts of cancer-causing substances to our food. So, not only are many of our foods not healthy, they're unsafe.

The FDA has even approved, as safe, additives it has known to be unsafe. Take, for example, Olestra, the fat substitute which was approved by the FDA over the objections of many leading food scientists. Olestra can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramping and may even contribute to cancer, heart disease and blindness. Foods containing Olestra must have a warning label on the package.

Then there's the artificial sweetener aspartame, also known as Nutrasweet. Aspartame was approved and claimed safe by a specially appointed FDA Commissioner after his own Board of Inquiry that investigated aspartame claimed it unsafe. Aspartame can cause birth defects, central nervous system disturbances, menstrual difficulties, brain damage in phenylketonurics, seizures, death and a long list of other reactions too numerous to mention. It may cause irreversible health damage over the long term.

Fats are another story. A certain amount of the right kind of fat is necessary for your nervous system, your immune system, the formation of cell membranes, and the absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins. The problem is that over 90% of the food produced today contain hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oil, which contributes to heart disease, elevated cholesterol and triglycerides, non-insulin dependent diabetes and cancer. Research even shows an association between attention deficit disorder and hydrogenated oils.

The next time you grocery shop, look at the label of every item before you buy. Unless you already buy all organic and natural foods, almost every item you pick up will contain hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils. Instead, choose products that say no hydrogenated oils. Use raw organic butter instead of margarine, and extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil or flaxseed oil (flaxseed oil should never be heated).

If you're eating more chicken, turkey and fish, because it's healthier, you may be surprised to learn that sliced chicken and turkey from the deli contains nitrites. And nitrites cause cancer. Nitrites are found in almost all processed meats, including luncheon meats, hot dogs, sausages and bacon. Then there's tuna, a healthy choice if it only contains tuna and water and is only eaten occasionally. But, most tuna contains broth or hydrolyzed vegetable protein, which contain MSG. And MSG is not required to be listed on the label because it is an ingredient in the broth, not directly added to the tuna. This is the way food manufacturers hide MSG in the food they produce. And hidden MSG can be a very serious problem to those who are sensitive to it. MSG can cause a wide variety of symptoms including migraines, numbness and tingling, asthma, seizures, diarrhea, panic attacks and heart problems.

Other sources of hidden MSG include autolyzed yeast, boullion, stock, malt extract, malt flavoring, barley malt, maltodextrin, natural flavors, pectin, seasonings, carrageenan, soy sauce, soy protein, whey protein, anything enzyme modified, fermented, protein fortified, or ultrapasteurized, fast foods, chips, condiments, salad dressings, lunch meats, sausages and soups. In fact, most processed foods contain MSG according to Kathleen Schwartz of the nonprofit group NoMSG.

So, buyer beware! Even if the label says "all natural ingredients" and "no preservatives," the product could contain harmful additives. So, how do you know which foods are really safe to eat? You need to read the labels and know how to interpret the information on the label.

Here's a few hints on what to eat and what to avoid: Eat fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, good quality protein and healthy fats. Avoid these additives:

Aspartame or Nutrasweet
Saccharin
MSG and Free Glutamates
Artificial colorings
Nitrites and Nitrates
Caffeine
BHA and BHT
Brominated vegetable oil or BVO
Olestra or Olean
Sulfites

Here's a general rule of thumb: If the list of ingredients is long, there are probably a lot of chemical additives in the product, and you're risking your health by eating it. If the list of ingredients is short, it may or may not have harmful additives in it, so you need to read the label carefully before you purchase it.

Dr. Christine Farlow has made it easy for you to identify which additives are harmful and which are not. In her handy pocket-sized book, FOOD ADDITIVES: A Shopper's Guide To What's Safe & What's Not, now in its 2004 revised edition, she classifies 800 commonly used food additives according to safety, whether they may cause allergic reactions and if they are Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) by the FDA. In just seconds, you can find out if an additive in the food you're buying is harmful to your health. It's clear, concise and easy to use. Make this book your constant grocery shopping companion and you'll never again wonder about the safety of the ingredients listed on the package. You'll know.

Dr. Christine H. Farlow, D.C. is a chiropractor, nutritionist and author. She has helped thousands improve their health through nutrition. For more information on food additives and healthy eating, visit http://www.healthyeatingadvisor.com. Contact Dr. Farlow at dr.cfarlow@healthyeatingadvisor.com.


MORE RESOURCES:

ESPN

Cooking With Ronda Rousey's Nutrition Coach In His Hotel-Room Kitchen
ESPN
Meet Mike Dolce, her nutrition coach. Dolce, who's been with Rousey's camp for her last five fights, is responsible for everything she consumes during training. For fight week, he's staying in the room next to hers at the hotel in Rio, hand-delivering ...

and more »


Muscatine Journal

A Visit to Nutrition: Farmers' Market Produce for your Health
Muscatine Journal
Also, corn seed comes in 60-, 70-, and 90-day varieties, so you could plant three different types and also have corn maturing at different times. Monica Duffy, Wilton, had sweet corn available, as well as sweet onions, another nutritious addition to ...



THV 11

Boozman: States need more flexibility in nutrition bill
THV 11
The Republican lawmaker from Arkansas on Friday told reporters he supports giving more flexibility through the Child Nutrition Act, which funds the National School Lunch and summer food programs along with many others. The current Child Nutrition Act ...
John Boozman: States Need More Flexibility in Nutrition BillArkansas Business Online

all 24 news articles »


Live Science

Almond Milk: Nutrition & Benefits
Live Science
At its most basic, almond milk is a drink made from ground almonds and water. It is a popular plant-based alternative to cow's milk. “Almond milk has been around for several years,” said Jenny Heap, a registered dietician with the Almond Board of ...



Columbia University Athletics

Columbia Sports Nutrition Part IV
Columbia University Athletics
In the five-part series on gocolumbialions.com, the Lion's sports dietitian, Andrew James Pierce, will provide an in-depth look at the Columbia Athletics Sports Nutrition Program. Columbia Athletics Sports Nutrition is one component of our Championship ...



School nutrition directors on tap for United conference
The Packer
Three school nutrition directors will give firsthand evidence of the importance of fruits and vegetables in school meals to attendees of the Sept. 28-30 United Fresh Produce Association's Washington Conference. The Sept. 29 roundtable discussion on ...

and more »


Healthy Eats (blog)

Nutrition News: Chipotle Unseats Subway, FDA Added-Sugar Label Rules and ...
Healthy Eats (blog)
The Food and Drug Administration has formally proposed requiring food makers to note the amount of added sugar and recommended consumption levels on nutrition labels for food and beverages, a move celebrated by health advocates and dreaded by ...



Debate over school nutrition standards heating up
Food Business News (registration)
30 deadline for the reauthorization of the school nutrition standards established by the Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 (H.H.F.K.A.) looming, groups are lining up on both sides of the debate to effect change. On one side are officials who want ...



Fortune

Big Soda, sugar groups fighting proposed new nutrition labels
Fortune
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just revised the proposed nutrition label changes to emphasize just how much sugar we consume from packaged food and drinks. The new rules, if adopted, would require labels to not just state how much sugar is ...
Consumers will be confused by added sugar information on nutrition label.Allentown Morning Call
FDA Proposes Additional Updates To Nutrition Facts PanelPerishableNews (press release) (registration)
FDA Wants Nutrition Label to Included %DV for Added SugarsCSPnet.com
Dispatch Times -Sentinel Republic
all 17 news articles »


Care2.com

Which Foods Have the Most Nutritional Bang for the Buck?
Care2.com
Nutrient density is a measure that shows which foods have the highest nutritional value in relation to caloric weight. The measurement can help you decide which foods have the most bang for your buck. Popularized by Dr. Fuhrman, a renowned doctor ...

and more »

Google News


Advertisement



Section Site Map - Submit News - Feedback - Comments - Advertise with Us

Copyright 2006 Luminati Inc. All rights reserved.