Bookmark Website  | Free Registration  | The Team
The Lounge  | Champions  | The Wire |  Schedule |  Audio  |  Arcade  |  The Top Ten  |  Historical  |  Email  |  Video

Food Additives Affect Behavior


On average 30% of foods in our daily diet are processed foods. These are foods that come in a box or a can and have many ingredients that are hard to pronounce, containing food starches, gums, preservatives, and colorings. Many processed foods have to be enriched, adding inorganic minerals and vitamins to compensate for the nutrition lost in the processing of the food. Some people believe enriched foods are good enough, and we will be able to absorb their nutrients sufficiently to benefit from them. But what about the great increase in type II diabetes in the past few years, seen especially now in children? What about the increase in Attention Deficit Disorder and behavioral problems in schools? Adults are now getting symptoms of Alzheimer's more quickly than before, and are suffering from chronic diseases earlier in life.

The first suggestion I tell parents who are struggling with a hyperactive child is to stay away from any food colorings, especially the added colorings in juices, cereals, snacks, and vitamin supplements. These food colorings affect the functioning of the nervous system. Our liver cannot break down these chemicals and they affect our neurotransmitters, and eventually our thinking ability. It is amazing the amount of food coloring found in processed foods. Significant increases in hyperactivity occur after getting 20 mg. of food coloring per day, which is much less than the amount found in many processed foods today.

When food additives are added to natural foods both physical and behavioral problems can occur. The three most common symptoms found when we get too many food additives are headaches, anxiety, and upset stomach. Common food additives to watch out for, beside food colorings, are preservatives, artificial sweeteners, and caffeine. Preservatives are found in all processed foods, and even in some of the natural foods such as fruits and vegetables. It is difficult to get all fresh food unless you grow it yourself. Preservatives prevent spoilage of food so that it can be transported from the farm or factory to our grocery stores.

The FDA generally regards each of these food additives as safe, at least in small quantities. But when combining them in foods and then looking at the potential cumulative effect, we have to realize that the more preservative and food additives we get on a daily basis, the more our liver has to detoxify. That is why headaches and bloating are common symptoms of too many food additives.

Among the many factors that shape the lives of children, nutrition often plays a critical role. What children eat during their growing years has a great effect on the way they think, learn, and act. Many studies have found, for example, that children with higher intakes of antioxidants, B vitamins and minerals do better in school than those children whose diets are lower in these nutrients. Others studies show that children who are exposed to too many environmental chemicals or heavy metals in the air and water have more trouble learning and remembering, and have more nervous system disorders.

The Feingold program is a children's nutritional program that recommends a diet based on foods that do not contain artificial flavors, preservatives, and food colorings. Numerous research studies found that symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder improved between 50 and 70% of the time while children followed this nutritional program.

One study, published in Lancet in 1985, showed that 79% of hyperactive children had symptoms improve when food chemicals were removed from their diet. Then when the food chemicals were re-introduced the symptoms returned. Sugar was found to have a similar detrimental effect as food chemicals. In controlled studies done at juvenile correctional facilities in the 1980s, they found that behavior improved in 47% of the 12 facilities that took part in the Feingold program, which included over 8000 juveniles.

Many health issues are caused by lack of bioavailable nutrition in our diet. Our digestive system tries to absorb nutrients from the foods we eat. Depending on the state of the food - baked, broiled, microwaved, or the additives added, our body can actually get more stressed eating foods that are hard for our liver to metabolize. This is why the National Cancer Institute keeps raising the number of fruits and vegetables recommended daily to prevent cancer, and keep our immune system healthy. This is another reason we are seeing earlier signs of indigestion and heartburn in children. The foods we put in our body have so many preservatives, and chemicals, and not enough real nutrition to be beneficial.

Dr. Jane Oelke, N.D., Ph.D. is Naturopath and Doctor of Homeopathy in Southwest Michigan. She is the author of "Natural Choices for Fibromyalgia" and "Natural Choices for Attention Deficit Disorder". She is a professional speaker on a variety of natural health topics, and can be reached at DoctorOelke@aol.com and http://www.NaturalChoicesforyou.com


MORE RESOURCES:

Food stamp bill has nutrition provision
The News Journal
A GOP-sponsored bill would limit food stamp spending in Delaware only to foods that have “proven beneficial nutritional value,” a change its sponsors say would bring the federally funded program in line with other state efforts to promote healthy ...
Child hunger a complex problemGreenville News

all 3 news articles »


Why Are Serving Sizes on Nutrition Labels So Small?
Parade
Why Are Serving Sizes on Nutrition Labels So Small? (iStock). R. F. of Anna, Tex., writes: The serving sizes on the nutrition labels for some foods are unrealistically small, especially for foods high in fat, sugar, or sodium. Are the small sizes an ...
Food facts: Reading nutrition labels may become much easierSioux City Journal
Nutrition Tip of the Week: Nutrition facts label makeoverLakenewsonline.com
Processors needs time to assess label printer capacity to comment on FDA ...AgraNet (subscription)

all 7 news articles »


Care2.com

11 Universal Truths in Nutrition We Actually Agree on
Care2.com
There is a lot of controversy in nutrition. Sometimes it seems like people can't agree on anything at all. But there are a few exceptions to this… some nutrition facts that aren't controversial. Here are 11 universal truths in nutrition that people ...



Messy diapers help show nutrition needs for premature, full-term babies
Your Houston News
COLLEGE STATION – A study that began with messy diapers is helping scientists understand how nutrition helps babies grow into healthy children, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research nutritionist. Because scientists cannot physically examine the ...



Share this Article
Algemeiner
In Goodall's book, “Harvest for Hope: A Guide to Mindful Eating,” the famous chimp researcher notes, “In his excellent book on family nutrition and healthy appetizing recipes, 'Disease-Proof Your Child,' [Fuhrman] points out that we have been ...



Book helps travelers stay on the right nutritional course
Honolulu Star-Advertiser
And now Zhukovskaya, 33, has condensed much of her health and wellness wisdom into a self-published, pocket-size book called "Traveler's Guide to Couture Nutrition: Top Tips for Eating On-the-Go" (available at alinaz.com for $11.11) which will help you ...



Siouxland school lunches and elderly nutrition for the week of April 20
Sioux City Journal
Persons 60 years of age and older and their spouses may participate in the elderly nutrition program in Siouxland. In Sioux City, meals are served Tuesday-Friday at Riverside Lutheran Church, 1817 Riverside Blvd.; on Monday at Riverside Gardens' ...



SoccerNation.com

Soccer Player Nutrition: Why Carbs Are Confusing
SoccerNation.com
Times change -- and so does nutrition advice for soccer players. Author and nutrition expert Nancy Clark explains what all the hype about carbs really means and how these nutrients are important to athletes, and especially youth soccer players.



Breast cancer nutrition seminar at Adelphi set for April 29
Newsday
Sachs creates nutritional plans and menus aimed at helping her patients successfully fight breast cancer and prevent a recurrence. She is teaming with Mitchell SuDock, executive chef at Mitch & Toni's restaurant in Albertson, for a free presentation on ...

and more »


Madison Civic Center hosts talk on nutrition, April 30
Independent Press
She has a masters' degree in nutrition from Cornell University. As a member of the American Dietetic Association and a Registered Dietitian she frequently speaks to community groups on nutrition and fitness topics. She has also taught exercise classes ...


Google News


Advertisement



Section Site Map - Submit News - Feedback - Comments - Advertise with Us

Copyright 2006 Luminati Inc. All rights reserved.