Bookmark Website  | Free Registration  | The Team
The Lounge  | Champions  | The Wire |  Schedule |  Audio  |  Arcade  |  The Top Ten  |  Historical  |  Email  |  Video

After the Big Project: Recovering From Success


My older daughter got married 10 days ago. The wedding was a joyous and extraordinary experience, way beyond our imaginings. I am deeply happy about all of this, and feel strongly validated by the whole experience.

On a project level, the wedding was a very satisfying culmination of a huge team effort. The logistics worked perfectly - the months of intensive work and the last several weeks of even more intensive (possibly crazy) work paid off.

So, what happens after an experience like this? After you get the job, have the baby, launch the global initiative, publish the book, or finish the house renovations? As your life gradually returns to "normal," you assimilate the new experience into your sense of your self. You let it in. You acclimate to the new altitude, look around, see what's different, what's the same. But mostly, you're exhausted and depleted. You need a period of recovery.

Achievers forget this so easily. You are groomed to be industrious and effective, but not to allow for recovery or transition between projects.

Let me share something with you from deep inside the experience of recovery. It's challenging. I know I'm exhausted at a deep level, and I'm taking care of myself in ways (I have learned) that work for me. Now that I've caught up on sleep, I'm keeping my schedule light -- refraining from filling my calendar. And I'm explicitly re-charging my batteries in a variety of ways. But I'm chafing. I'm judging my relative inactivity. I'm annoyed at myself for not having the energy or enthusiasm for a new project. Now, mind you, as a coach I KNOW this territory of transition! I know there's typically an energy drop after a big project, a letdown, that there is a rhythm to these things and it makes sense to work WITH the rhythms. I regularly coach other people through transitions, and it's still hard. Bottom line, it's just a lot more fun to be onto the next big project. And I'm not there yet.

How hard is it for you to recover from the culmination of a huge project or life-event? And what's it like for the other people in your life - your staff, your family, your boss? Most of us expect ourselves to bounce forward from challenge to challenge without letup. (And certainly there are times in our lives when no letup is possible.) But the most efficient way to climb a mountain is NOT to just charge straight up it, non-stop. Less experienced climbers are more likely to attempt the straight-up route, and they are prone to early burnout, injury, devastating fatigue.

The most efficient way to climb a mountain is to take it in stages. Between stages, experienced climbers stop, eat, sleep, rest, and adjust to the new altitude. Many of us want to take our lives as a non-stop mountain climb, when in fact we are better served to stop from time to time and recover from the last stage of the climb.

Sometimes all that's required is to keep your schedule light after a big deadline. To plan a weekend at a bed and breakfast after the proposal is due, after the product launch, after you deliver the copy to the printer, after your son's last college application is due. Or to seriously under-promise what you will deliver in the few weeks after a major push. Try it. You may find that, like me, you chafe at the slower pace. But your high energy will return more quickly if you allow yourself the full process of recovery.

If you find yourself perpetually drained and without energy for projects you truly care about, you may need to make some important course corrections in your career or work-life balance. Contact me for an initial consultation at no charge.

Copyright 2004, Sharon Teitelbaum.

Sharon Teitelbaum is a Work-Life and Career Coach who works with high achieving women with young children, people at mid-career, and professionals seeking greater career satisfaction or work-life balance. Her book, Getting Unstuck Without Coming Unglued: Restoring Work-Life Balance, is available at her website, http://www.STcoach.com.

Certified as a Professional Certified Coach (PCC), Sharon works by phone with clients around the world and in-person in Boston.

She delivers keynotes and workshops on work-life balance issues, has been in national publications including The New York Times and Working Mother Magazine, and has appeared on cable and network television. She publishes Strategies for Change, a newsletter offering practical tips for work-life success.

Sharon has been married for 30 years and is the mother of two amazing young women. You can contact her here.


MORE RESOURCES:

Point to prove: Motivation a big factor in Harvick's early success
FOXSports.com
We saw Saturday night at Darlington a simply dominating performance from Kevin Harvick. I know it's an old cliche but it sure fits in this case -- "What a difference a year can make." In eight races so far this season, he already has two wins and has ...

and more »


New York Daily News

Peyton Manning says he will use Broncos' Super Bowl heartache as motivation
New York Daily News
In his first public comments since the highest-scoring team in NFL history was destroyed by the Seattle Seahawks from the opening snap two months ago, Manning said the Broncos' 43-8 loss will serve as motivation in 2014. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Manning holds on to heartache of Super BowlColorado Springs Gazette

all 152 news articles »


Motivation for Luiz Razia? The Long Beach podium staring him in the face
NBCSports.com
Luiz Razia, who entered the field as one of the top preseason championship contenders given his GP2 experience and near-F1 race opportunity, has some personal bulletin board material to motivate him to do better. The 25-year-old Brazilian has finished ...



The Independent

Smoking cannabis could change the part of the brain dealing with motivation ...
The Independent
Smoking cannabis just once or twice a week could result in “major” changes to areas of the brain important for emotion and motivation, US scientists have said. In a study which one expert said challenged the idea that “casual” marijuana use is largely ...
Cannabis use linked to brain changes in emotion and motivationIrish Examiner
Casual cannabis use alters brain, warn scientistsNew Zealand Herald
Report suggests cannabis use can harm brainDaily Free Press (subscription)
Telegraph.co.uk (blog)
all 22 news articles »


Debate: Smoking weed affects young people's motivation, so is society too ...
The Independent
Debate: Smoking weed affects young people's motivation, so is society too relaxed about marijuana? Share. Young people who smoke marijuana may be at risk of “major” changes to the area of the brain that regulates motivation, a new study claims.



Howard educators barely get a passing grade in Gallup poll on motivation
Baltimore Sun
Educators and employees in Howard County schools are slightly more engaged than employees nationwide, according to the results of a Gallup poll released last week, even though more than 60 percent didn't meet that standard. Tim Hodges, director of ...

and more »


Customers' luxury motivation turns to self-reward, execs say
Automotive News
NEW YORK -- The definition of luxury automotive brands, and the motivation of luxury-car shoppers, is changing from a look-at-me display of wealth to a self reward for achieving success. That was the conclusion of a panel of luxury-brand executives at ...

and more »


Scorpio Moon of Motivation
Post-Bulletin
Scorpio Moon of Motivation Associated Press |. The wise Scorpio moon looks for a motive behind every action. It's particularly helpful when examining your own motives, which are often hidden even to you. Start with your to-do list. For each item, ask ...



Child motivation must improve in schools
NL Times
Education Inspection believes that there is room for improvement in motivating pupils. A report for the 2012-2013 school year reveals that Dutch students are less motivated to learn than their age mates abroad. According to inspectors, they observed ...



How To Motivate People: 4 Steps Backed By Science
TIME
When tested in national surveys against such seemingly crucial factors as intelligence, ability, and salary, level of motivation proves to be a more significant component in predicting career success. While level of motivation is highly correlated with ...


Google News


Advertisement



Section Site Map - Submit News - Feedback - Comments - Advertise with Us

Copyright 2006 Luminati Inc. All rights reserved.