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Do You Take Yours Trained or Untrained?


If you ain't pissing anyone off, you're not doing anything worth while. Like religion and politics, martial arts are not for a lack of its zealots. Decide right now, you can either A. Continue to "sip the kool-aide" or B. Look to improve. One criticism about our training material is that it is simple and would work against some one who is untrained. What the hell does this mean, exactly? Does this pertain to the woman who takes muay thai or the serial rapist sociopath that has successfully applied his trade a dozen times? Does it apply to the mixed martial artists or a bag man on a pick up? Who do you want to fight for your life against, the martial artist or emotionally disturbed person (EPD) who gargles with pepper spray?

Personally, if I had my choice, I'd take my chances with the guy who thinks he has all the answers and not the guy who has nothing to loose. Is our stuff simple, you bet your ass it's simple. It has to be. Anything that works is simple and straight forward. (Remember that thing; what's it called?the WHEEL). Here's a pop quiz, what's the most widely used technique with the highest degree of success and knock out rate? (Drum roll please?..) The Over Hand Right! But that's so simple, everybody knows that. You learn that your first day of boxing. Since it's so simple and everybody knows it; why does it work? Because some one decided to seize the opportunity to throw it and it hit its mark. That's the essence of a fight, timing, opportunity and luck. The techniques can't be complicated. As we mentioned countless times before, anything can be blocked if you know it's coming. But you will be approached in a way or by a person who is banking on the fact that you won't do anything. So anything you do has a chance.So you're trained, great.

God bless you and congratulations. Now I heard Jon Bluming say something that I thought was right on the money. If you don't know who Jon Bluming is, get your google working. He said that grappling and submissions are treated as "support systems" and he continued to say that you will spend more time training your support systems rather that your primary self defense. That doesn't mean don't train in these systems, because you will fall back on these if you, well- miss. Which happens more than you think; but you want a front line of defense.

This is where we come in:
Is it simple: YES.
Basic: YES.
Let me ask you:

Would you rather practice knocking some one out or dragging them to the ground? Would you rather practice for a 5 - 10 second blast or a five minute round?

Do you know when your next competition is? It could be in the parking lot tonight after work. Are you warmed up? Do you have your training equipment on? Is the ref there?

Now make no mistake, I am not advocating NOT practice other endeavors, I think they're great. Competition and training are excellent character builders and will prove there own worth in the grand scheme of things. But if you're serious about realistic, explosive self defense, here's the check list:

1.Arm your self to the teeth. Guns, knives, Sherman tank.
2. Pepper spray, Stun guns
3. Black jacks, sap gloves, spring kosh, asp
4. The environment: bricks, rocks, garbage cans
5. Hands, feet, teeth simple straight forward basic technique. Strikes, gouges.
6. Grappling, submissions.

Bonus: the better shape you're in, the better all of this stuff works (yes, even shooting). The sharper you are, the better you will operate under stress.

So will this stuff "work" against someone who is trained- you bet, it has and it does. It's always good to have a back up plan, but first things first.

Musashi said, it's regrettable to die with your sword still in its sheath. Personally, I get looks from other martial artists when the catch a glimpse of what I carry. They look at me like "why do you need that stuff". My reply is, I'd rather have and not need it than need it and not have it. It also gives me a glimpse of how nave they are. Are you really going to depend on that when some street skel looks to put a hurt on you? If I can, I'll work my way down from number 1 to number 6. Hey, don't get me wrong, some days you start at 5.

The 3 to 5 year martial artist.

This is the person I get the greatest reaction from. They are very in to their training, which is great. But they believe they are in to end all, be all system. After they read the page at www.thetruthaboutselfdefense.com they feel compelled to write me and tell me how wrong I am (with out viewing the videos). First off, if you feel the need to write some guy on the internet to really show me something- get a life. The irony is, if they stay with there training, eventually they come back. Why? The men and women who have been in the martial arts for more than a decade realize the value of the material and just want to add it to there bag of tricks. These people have been to the show and realize that in a real fight, its what ever it takes. That doesn't mean the a fifth degree black belt in tae kwon do is going to hand his dobok up and put on some combat boots (well, not permanently). What it does meant that this person can look into there own training and pull out what's effective. Two, realize that they don't have all the answers and they want to just get better. And three, they realize that there is a lot more to martial arts than just fighting. Here's a secret learning how to fight is the easy part.

Carl and I are constantly receiving instruction. We are not "making this stuff up". We learn this from real people who actually had to do this FOR REAL.

Making stuff up seems to be a trend. Some "expert" invents something and is going to tell you what's the best and the ultimate because it has an Acronym attached to it with a cute name.

2005 http://www.thetruthaboutselfdefense.com

Damian Ross is the owner of Zenshin and instructor of Tekkenryu jujutsu and Kodokan Judo. He started competing in the combative sport of wrestling in 1975 at the age of 7 and began his study of Asian martial arts with Moo Duk Kwan Tae Kwon Do at the age of 16 in 1984. In 1989, Shinan Cestari gave a seminar at Sensei Ross's dojo. Sensei Ross has trained under Shinan Cestari's direction ever since. In addition to Tekkenryu Jujutsu, Judo and Tae Kwon Do, Sensei Ross has also studied Bando. Sensei Ross continues his study of Judo under the direction of 8th degree black belt Yoshisada Yonezuka and Tekkenryu Jujutsu under it's founder, Carl Cestari.

Below are is a list of some of his title ranks:

Yodan (fourth degree black belt) Tekkenryu Jujutsu under Carl Cestari
Shodan (First degree black belt) Kodokan Judo under Yoshisada Yonezuka
Varsity Wrestling Lehigh University under Thad Turner
2nd Degree Black Belt Tae Kwon Do
http://www.thetruthaboutselfdefense.com


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