Advertisement
Advertisement

Magomed Abdusalamov: Postscript

By Thomas Hauser

Magomed Abdusalamov woke up in unfamiliar surroundings on Christmas morning. Quite possibly, he was unaware of the change.

On November 2nd, Adbusalamov suffered a life-altering brain injury in a fight against Mike Perez at Madison Square Garden. For weeks, he lay near death. He was at Roosevelt Hospital for 52 days.

On Christmas Eve, Magomed was transported to Helen Hayes Hospital in West Haverstraw, New York. The hospital specializes in physical rehabilitation for patients who have suffered catastrophic brain injuries. Russian tycoon Andrey Ryabinskiy has committed to paying for at least two months of rehabilitation. The cost of Magomed’s stay at Helen Hayes Hospital will be $51,000 a month.

“Rehabilitation” is a relative term.

The hospital’s literature states that its program “treats the complex effects of brain injury, such as difficulty walking, communicating, eating and dressing, limitations in memory and thinking skills, and social, emotional and cognitive issues.”

That has led some people to say, “Magomed will live . . . Magomed is in rehab . . . Magomed will be fine.”

Magomed won’t be fine.

The left side of Magomed’s head is grotesquely misshapen. There’s a crater where part of his skull was removed during surgery. The visual effect is as if the wax had dripped away from the top of an irregularly burning candle. A sign above his bed at Roosevelt Hospital warned health care providers, “No left bone flap.”

Magomed breathes through a tube that has been inserted in his trachea. His eyes gaze vacantly into space. It’s unclear how much, if anything, he comprehends.
 
He is alive.

Some people would choose to not continue living under the current circumstances of Magomed’s life. In his present condition, he is not capable of making decisions of that nature. His family has chosen for him.

It’s too soon to know what his condition will be a year from now. His doctors say that, whatever happens, there will be serious neurological deficits. Damage to the brain is more likely to be irreversible than damage to other organs. The younger a person is, the more likely it is that another part of the brain can compensate for the damage. The extent of permanent injury depends on the cause of the damage, which portions of the brain were damaged, and how extensive the damage is.

The hopes and expectations for Magomed are radically different now from what they were two months ago. The arc of his life has been reconfigured. The goal is no longer to become heavyweight champion of the world. The hope – although not necessarily the expectation – is that someday he will be able to think coherently and articulate his thoughts in a way that is understood by others. That he will be able to feed himself and control his bodily functions. That perhaps he will walk again.

This is a tragedy in the truest sense of the word.

Stepping up at the right time saves lives. Referees stop fights. Ring doctors stop fights. Athletic commission chairmen and chairwomen and executive directors stop fights. Cornermen stop fights. When no one steps up to stop a fight, a fighter’s life can change irrevocably for the worse.

There’s an issue of fact as to whether or not New York State Athletic Commission personnel suggested that Abdusalamov go to the hospital immediately after the fight. Had he done so, he might be on the road to a full recovery today.

Section 213.6 of The New York State Athletic Commission Laws and Rules Regulating Boxing references the duties of ring physicians and states, “Such physician may also require that the injured participant and his manager . . . report to a hospital after the contest for such period of time as such physician deems advisable."

In other words, commission personnel could have required that Abdusalamov go to the hospital.

Also, New York State Athletic Commission personnel concede that there was no offer of help to transport Magomed to the hospital.

This was a man who had just been beaten up – badly beaten up – as a designed component of a spectacle intended to entertain people. When his part in the spectacle was over, his nose was shattered. The left side of his face was disfigured as a consequence of cuts, bruises, swelling, and the likelihood of more broken bones. Taking NYSAC personnel at their word, he was in effect told, “Thanks; good job. Now go outside, find a cab, and get to the hospital on your own.”

Would any football team (high school, college, or pro) tell a player with injuries of that nature to take a cab to the hospital? If a tennis player was injured at the U.S. Open, would the organizers hand him an insurance form and tell him to take a cab to the hospital?

What happened to Magomed Abdusalamov will be used by some as an argument for the abolition of boxing. It’s certainly an argument for reform.

Here the thoughts of Bernard Hopkins are instructive.

“After I fought Roy Jones,” Hopkins says, “they made me go to the hospital. I stayed overnight. And I won that fight. No fighter wants to go to the hospital, lie on a gurney. It’s that macho stuff. But I have people around me who watch my back. Most fighters don’t have that. Or if they do, the people who are trying to watch their back don’t know how.”

“You hear how everyone is talking now,” Hopkins continues. “’Oh, we care so much about the health and safety of the fighter.’ But they don’t mean it. They don’t care. They – and you know who ‘they’ are – treat us like cattle. None of these people are thinking about the injured fighter. It’s not their kid. It’s not their husband or brother or father. The fight is over. The next fight is coming out. They just don’t care.”

Thomas Hauser can be reached by email at [email protected] . His most recent book (Straight Writes and Jabs: An Inside Look at Another Year in Boxing) was published by the University of Arkansas Press. His earlier in-depth investigative report on Magomed Abdusalamov can be read at http://www.boxingscene.com/magomed-abdusalamov-dark-side-boxing--71949

User Comments and Feedback (Register For Free To Comment) Comment by Mr Ehrmantraut on 12-26-2013

Wishing Mago all the best in his recovery.

Comment by LoadedWraps on 12-26-2013

I rewatched this fight last night, it's really tragic watching the fight develop with the hindsight of the aftermath and consequences in mind. Terribly tragedy. He took a beating. The whole left side of his face was swollen.

Comment by Enzo Mc is SHIT on 12-26-2013

Very sad that he's still in a terrible state but it's not long since people were saying he'd never wake up (and one idiot posted on here that he'd died). He's a real fighter so let's hope he can continue…

Comment by JD88 on 12-26-2013

Too many people who could it stop the fight that night. We'll let beging with the trainer, manager, second, and cutman those are the primary people who supposed to protected the fighter. Then you can move to the referee, commission…

Comment by KennyPowers on 12-26-2013

I watched this fight. They should have stopped it earlier. I love boxing but I don't like seeing people seriously injured. Shame on the new York commission for not providing the treatment this man deserved. Life is tough

Post a Comment/View More User Comments (36)
Top Headlines Vargas Predicts He'll Make Sadam Ali Quit; 'Not On My Level' Wlodarczyk Faces Brudov on 3/4, Shumenov in Play For April Abel Sanchez Not Viewing Andre Ward's Inactivity as Advantage Quigg Motivated By Fear of Losing as Frampton Bout Nears Khan: Mayweather, Pacquiao Would Be Easier Than Canelo! Ballisai Replaces Kevin Mitchell in Tatli EBU Title Fight on 3/18 Pungluang Sor Singyu Retains WBO Belt With Technical Nod Win Mayweather Stumped on Who Would Win Fury vs. Wilder Floyd Mayweather: Timing Was Not Right For Amir Khan Bout Roy Jones Jr. and Kevin Mitchell: A Tale of Two Retirements McWilliams Arroyo Creeps In, Eyed For Roman Gonzalez Bout Marquez Says There Have Been Talks For Miguel Cotto Bout Photos: Povetkin Getting Jacked, in Beast Mode For Deontay Wilder Estrada's Promoter Questions Chocolatito's Pound For Pound Rank Luis Ortiz Content With Random Testing To Prove He's Clean Bob Arum: I Don't Ever Want To Retire! Why Would I? Robert Garcia Hopes Brother Mikey is Back in First Half of 2016 Tarver's Suspension Upheld, Fined $50K For Positive PED Test Lucas Matthysse-Pablo Cesar Cano Showdown in Talks Bob Arum Continues To Be The Master of Salesmanship Pungluang Sor Singyu Defends WBO Belt Against Pabustan Luis Ortiz Hopes Activity Level Doesn't Slow Down Anytime Soon Chavez Jr. Training Hard For Possible Jack Bout, Says Garcia Lebedev Will Go With Ramirez Unification First, Then Mandatory Mike Tyson Returns For Round 2 at The MGM Grand Antonio Orozco-Miguel Acosta Set For 3/25 at Fantasy Springs David Haye Tells Joshua Not To Risk His '0' Before They Fight McGuigan Believes Frampton vs. Quigg is a Crossover Fight Flanagan-Mathews: Zolani Tete To Face Jose Santos Gonzalez Sullivan Barrera: My Goal is To Knock Andre Ward Out! Blackwell-Eubank Jr. Set For March 26 At Wembley Garcia: Canelo vs. Khan is Going To Be a Pretty Close Fight Ricky Hatton Discusses Several Emotional Topics on Life, Career Loeffler: We Expect Canelo To Defend Against Golovkin Video: Robert Garcia on Brandon Rios, Canelo-Khan, More Sauerland: Abraham Win Could Make Groves Bout Much Bigger Theophane: Mayweather Will Advise Me on How To Beat Broner Golovkin Keeps The Line Moving in Supremacy Quest at 160 Boxing Priest Makes Boxing Comeback After 20 Years Arum Spoke To HBO About Making Golovkin vs. Ramirez
Advertisement

Latest Active Forum Threads
Advertisement
Advertisement