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#1
Old 11-08-2008, 09:51 PM
N-Mark-E
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Default Just starting running..

Im just starting to go out running. Ive never done this before so i dont know whats best for me. I just want to know how long/far i have to run and how many times a week.
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#2
Old 11-08-2008, 11:05 PM
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Originally Posted by N-Mark-E View Post
Im just starting to go out running. Ive never done this before so i dont know whats best for me. I just want to know how long/far i have to run and how many times a week.
Give more info about yourself. Your height, weight, built, etc. I would take it easy since you just starting out. Try doing 1 mile a day for a week. then 2 miles a day for a week. then 3 miles a day for a week. then 4 miles a day for a week.
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#3
Old 11-08-2008, 11:12 PM
N-Mark-E
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Originally Posted by 817boy View Post
Give more info about yourself. Your height, weight, built, etc. I would take it easy since you just starting out. Try doing 1 mile a day for a week. then 2 miles a day for a week. then 3 miles a day for a week. then 4 miles a day for a week.
Im about 5,11 in height. 9.3stone in weight. Also whats the best time of day to out running? Thx for ur help
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#4
Old 11-09-2008, 12:43 AM
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I am new to boxing but have some experience running so I will try my best to give some pointers.

I started running in the army. We ran 5 days a week for 3-5 miles each morning at 7 to 7.5 minutes per mile, sprinting the last quarter mile each time. About three times a month we would do an endurance run for 8 to 12 miles. I remember the standard was 8 miles in under 60 minutes. Sometimes we would do speed drills, typically using telephone poles to mark distance, sprint for 2 poles and slow down for 1, then repeat. Of course, sometimes we would have to take a PT test in which you were timed for 2 miles as fast as you can.

I came from a high-speed unit so there was no excuse for not being able to keep up on the morning runs. The guys that couldn't keep up after a certain time were kicked out of the unit. The point to all of this is, I saw different people react differently to the training. There were lots of times where guys vommitted or dry heaved, especially after something challenging like a steep incline where we were forced to speed up. Once a guy passed out and had to be given an I.V. This might be seen as an improper method by some, but I will say this. In short order most men were able to keep a pace of 7.5 minutes per mile comfortably for 5 miles.

My advice when starting out is to start hard and heavy. Running in the beginning is going to suck anyway. You will have pain in your legs. Your shortness of breath will feel like you are going to die. But this cardio barrier will pass. Trying to break yourself in slowly you are only extending the pain over a longer period of time.

Things I would do differently is to incoroporate alternative types of cardio workouts. That is the advantage to being civilian, we have a choice. I personlly like treadmills and ski machines. Treadmills are good because it forces you to stay a certain pace, which you manually input, without slowing down. It's so easy, especially running alone, to slow down and not realize. Also, the treadmill is a great tool to assess your cardio fitness level. The advantage of the ski machine is the low impact on the joints and it works different muscle groups than the running motion. You can get a good cardio blast from these things, believe it or not, if you sprint. I personally do not care for biking. It takes so much longer to achieve the same thing on a bike as running. I very rarely use the bike, only for endurance when I have PLENTY of time (2 hours or so). But then again, a friend of mine swears by a bike workout for speed, 30 minutes at vomit inducing speed with plenty of resistance.

These days I do roadwork maybe 2-3 times a week. In the winter I rely heavily on machines. When starting out, my suggestion is to run for a minimum of 3 miles at a time, almost every day if possible. You should push youself at a pace where you are gasping for air and need to stop. This is not because it is uncomfortable and you are quitting, but because you feel like if you don't stop you will pass out. You will break through this cardio barrier in no time and these feelings will pass if you stick with it. If you have to stop, finish 3 miles no matter what. This is regardless of whether on a treadmill or on the road. There is no substitute for running on a road by the way. Always bring a stopwatch with you and time yourself. 3 miles is plenty in the beginning. You will break through the cardio wall before you know it. When you do, be sure to change things up like speed, distance, and low impact workouts like skiing. This is the best advice I can give based on my humble experience. I hope it was some help to you.
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#5
Old 11-09-2008, 09:49 AM
N-Mark-E
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Originally Posted by parkt View Post
I am new to boxing but have some experience running so I will try my best to give some pointers.

I started running in the army. We ran 5 days a week for 3-5 miles each morning at 7 to 7.5 minutes per mile, sprinting the last quarter mile each time. About three times a month we would do an endurance run for 8 to 12 miles. I remember the standard was 8 miles in under 60 minutes. Sometimes we would do speed drills, typically using telephone poles to mark distance, sprint for 2 poles and slow down for 1, then repeat. Of course, sometimes we would have to take a PT test in which you were timed for 2 miles as fast as you can.

I came from a high-speed unit so there was no excuse for not being able to keep up on the morning runs. The guys that couldn't keep up after a certain time were kicked out of the unit. The point to all of this is, I saw different people react differently to the training. There were lots of times where guys vommitted or dry heaved, especially after something challenging like a steep incline where we were forced to speed up. Once a guy passed out and had to be given an I.V. This might be seen as an improper method by some, but I will say this. In short order most men were able to keep a pace of 7.5 minutes per mile comfortably for 5 miles.

My advice when starting out is to start hard and heavy. Running in the beginning is going to suck anyway. You will have pain in your legs. Your shortness of breath will feel like you are going to die. But this cardio barrier will pass. Trying to break yourself in slowly you are only extending the pain over a longer period of time.

Things I would do differently is to incoroporate alternative types of cardio workouts. That is the advantage to being civilian, we have a choice. I personlly like treadmills and ski machines. Treadmills are good because it forces you to stay a certain pace, which you manually input, without slowing down. It's so easy, especially running alone, to slow down and not realize. Also, the treadmill is a great tool to assess your cardio fitness level. The advantage of the ski machine is the low impact on the joints and it works different muscle groups than the running motion. You can get a good cardio blast from these things, believe it or not, if you sprint. I personally do not care for biking. It takes so much longer to achieve the same thing on a bike as running. I very rarely use the bike, only for endurance when I have PLENTY of time (2 hours or so). But then again, a friend of mine swears by a bike workout for speed, 30 minutes at vomit inducing speed with plenty of resistance.

These days I do roadwork maybe 2-3 times a week. In the winter I rely heavily on machines. When starting out, my suggestion is to run for a minimum of 3 miles at a time, almost every day if possible. You should push youself at a pace where you are gasping for air and need to stop. This is not because it is uncomfortable and you are quitting, but because you feel like if you don't stop you will pass out. You will break through this cardio barrier in no time and these feelings will pass if you stick with it. If you have to stop, finish 3 miles no matter what. This is regardless of whether on a treadmill or on the road. There is no substitute for running on a road by the way. Always bring a stopwatch with you and time yourself. 3 miles is plenty in the beginning. You will break through the cardio wall before you know it. When you do, be sure to change things up like speed, distance, and low impact workouts like skiing. This is the best advice I can give based on my humble experience. I hope it was some help to you.
Wow, thx for that! So 3 miles almost every day? This has actually made me want to go out and start running more lol. I bought a skipping rope the other day. That helps cardio right? So wont that help with my running in some way?
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#6
Old 11-09-2008, 10:41 AM
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Skipping rope definitely won't hurt. It has the benefit too of improving coordination and moving on your toes. Footwork is so important in boxing that the jump rope I think is like standard equipment to all boxing gyms. But any coach will probably tell you that there is no substitute for good old-fashioned roadwork. You have to put in the miles.
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#7
Old 11-09-2008, 11:01 AM
N-Mark-E
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Originally Posted by parkt View Post
Skipping rope definitely won't hurt. It has the benefit too of improving coordination and moving on your toes. Footwork is so important in boxing that the jump rope I think is like standard equipment to all boxing gyms. But any coach will probably tell you that there is no substitute for good old-fashioned roadwork. You have to put in the miles.

I went out running once before. When i had finished, after the run and later on in the day. When i was breathing i got this hissing noise in my chest? Is that normal to anyone just starting to run? And swallowing alot of crap?
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Old 11-09-2008, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parkt View Post
I am new to boxing but have some experience running so I will try my best to give some pointers.

I started running in the army. We ran 5 days a week for 3-5 miles each morning at 7 to 7.5 minutes per mile, sprinting the last quarter mile each time. About three times a month we would do an endurance run for 8 to 12 miles. I remember the standard was 8 miles in under 60 minutes. Sometimes we would do speed drills, typically using telephone poles to mark distance, sprint for 2 poles and slow down for 1, then repeat. Of course, sometimes we would have to take a PT test in which you were timed for 2 miles as fast as you can.

I came from a high-speed unit so there was no excuse for not being able to keep up on the morning runs. The guys that couldn't keep up after a certain time were kicked out of the unit. The point to all of this is, I saw different people react differently to the training. There were lots of times where guys vommitted or dry heaved, especially after something challenging like a steep incline where we were forced to speed up. Once a guy passed out and had to be given an I.V. This might be seen as an improper method by some, but I will say this. In short order most men were able to keep a pace of 7.5 minutes per mile comfortably for 5 miles.

My advice when starting out is to start hard and heavy. Running in the beginning is going to suck anyway. You will have pain in your legs. Your shortness of breath will feel like you are going to die. But this cardio barrier will pass. Trying to break yourself in slowly you are only extending the pain over a longer period of time.

Things I would do differently is to incoroporate alternative types of cardio workouts. That is the advantage to being civilian, we have a choice. I personlly like treadmills and ski machines. Treadmills are good because it forces you to stay a certain pace, which you manually input, without slowing down. It's so easy, especially running alone, to slow down and not realize. Also, the treadmill is a great tool to assess your cardio fitness level. The advantage of the ski machine is the low impact on the joints and it works different muscle groups than the running motion. You can get a good cardio blast from these things, believe it or not, if you sprint. I personally do not care for biking. It takes so much longer to achieve the same thing on a bike as running. I very rarely use the bike, only for endurance when I have PLENTY of time (2 hours or so). But then again, a friend of mine swears by a bike workout for speed, 30 minutes at vomit inducing speed with plenty of resistance.

These days I do roadwork maybe 2-3 times a week. In the winter I rely heavily on machines. When starting out, my suggestion is to run for a minimum of 3 miles at a time, almost every day if possible. You should push youself at a pace where you are gasping for air and need to stop. This is not because it is uncomfortable and you are quitting, but because you feel like if you don't stop you will pass out. You will break through this cardio barrier in no time and these feelings will pass if you stick with it. If you have to stop, finish 3 miles no matter what. This is regardless of whether on a treadmill or on the road. There is no substitute for running on a road by the way. Always bring a stopwatch with you and time yourself. 3 miles is plenty in the beginning. You will break through the cardio wall before you know it. When you do, be sure to change things up like speed, distance, and low impact workouts like skiing. This is the best advice I can give based on my humble experience. I hope it was some help to you.

The advice overall is good, but I'd can the hard and heavy for now.
What will happen is you will burn yourself out and hate running.
Slow and steady at a comfortable pace until you build some endurance with quick bursts of speed mixed in (50 to 200 meters) until you get your stamina up, then follow the plan of this man.
The idea is, if you always think of it as painful, it's going to be and that's what he's setting you up for.
I say start slow, go slow, just make the distance first and then worry about the sprints and quick bursts you need for boxing.

After you're stamina is sufficient, hit the track for some workouts.

After a while, you will be working it good. I know a very famous boxer who would do countless sprints after a while, from 100 to 800 meters and he claimed it took forever to get him tired.
He didn't reach that threshold without some slow long distance stamina he built up before.
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#9
Old 11-09-2008, 01:25 PM
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If you've never run before, hard and heavy is the sure way to injury and no more running... Start out lightly, and build up your work capacity.
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Old 11-09-2008, 02:26 PM
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If you've never run before, hard and heavy is the sure way to injury and no more running... Start out lightly, and build up your work capacity.
Agreed. I know from experience that if I stay jumping rope for 20 minutes, at a hard intensity, I will surely aggravate my stress fracture. I noticed that if I just start slow, doing maybe 10 minutes a day one week, 11 minutes next week, 12 minutes next week, and so on, I will inevitably get up to my goal of 20 hard minutes, but, in doing so, I will be able to avoid the injury that could potentially keep me from jumping rope forever.

Obviously it is important to overcome the initial barrier of hard cardiovascular training, but, with the same logic, you could make the point that someone that is just starting out doing strength training should be doing 1000 push ups on their first day, and just pushing themselves through for the first month. To me, that's just not a smart form of training.
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