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#25
Old 01-29-2013, 12:27 PM
S. Saddler 1310
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -PANDA- View Post
not in full disagreement here but going by that reasoning I feel he would've been as agressive against foreman as well, he chose to box him patiently instead

also quintana had a huge win over then highly regarded prospect joel julio and was perceived as a boxer puncher while cotto was moving up from 140 where he struggled against lesser or equally regarded punchers. by speculation at the time cotto could've lost fighting the way he did...that's why I feel cotto was in his prime during the mosley fight when he showed he was a more complete fighter
i guess we can say that even a fighter's prime has its stages.

i always tend to feel that fighters are at their best when their boxing intellect and physical ability are nearest to peaking together. for instance, a fighter like Calzaghe was maybe a little past his physical peak in 2006/2007, but his ring-acumen was now so well developed that it created the best version of Calzaghe when combined with his still very strong physical state. i believe that to be true of Hopkins at a point in time, too.

re. the point you made about the Foreman fight, that fight did come some time after the period you mention (Mosley to Margarito I), and Cotto did (for whatever reason) seem to become more measured in general after Margarito I, with the exception of the Pacquiao fight, where he quickly got lulled into feeling he could do well in exchanges with the smaller man (this display of strategic immaturity is perhaps excusable, given that Pacquiao was such an unusually beguiling case among cases of little fighters moving up in weight). even against comparative cannon-fodder like Jennings at welterweight, he appeared to take it steady and deliberate.

as an additional note, the first of Cotto's performances against Margarito is often harshly critiqued for its perceived naivety, while the second, achieved while past his physical best, is often praised as a much more mature showing (others may argue that his success owed to facing an inferior version of Margarito, although the truth probably lies in between). one might speculate that Cotto reached full intellectual maturity as a fighter a little too late, as it's often suggested that he suffered a sharp physical decline following the two very harsh beatings he received within an 18 month spell.

interesting subject.

Last edited by S. Saddler 1310; 01-29-2013 at 12:30 PM.
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