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#21
Old 11-13-2012, 09:03 PM
1sballotHOF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Rumack View Post
The reason it's so much more lucrative is because (1) they perform so much more often, and (2) the audience is so much bigger. So you've got a larger group of people paying to see the sport far more often.

Audience size is a product of promotion and the cultivation of the sport in the communities that the audience lives in. And I suppose the question you have to ask is whether or not boxing actually has a presence in most people's day to day lives.

Is there a local boxing club? Did they box in school as they were growing up like they played football, basketball, or soccer? Is there a boxer from their town that gets national press attention? These are the things that create a mass audience of fans for a sport on a sustainable basis.

Sure, a megastar will come along every now and then who will pull in huge numbers, but that's not something that repairs structural problems in the sport for the most part. 3 million ppv buys on a Saturday night isn't much good if local gyms can't pay their electricity bill come Monday morning.
Your just saying, what we've known for a long long time already. What's the point of this thread?

Why aren't their anymore elite American HW boxers now a days??? Money.

/thread.
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