View Full Version : Ike Ibeabuchi - what really happened?


Hard Boiled HK
07-27-2006, 10:55 PM
What really happened to Ike Ibeabuchi? I know he committed rape and was sent to prison, but I also read things that he was going insane. He was hearing voices in his head and saw demons? Does anyone know anything about him?

I personally think he was one of the most fierced fighters ever, along with Mike Tyson and David Tua.

SABBATH
07-27-2006, 11:12 PM
..."Whether or not the epic slugfest with Tua was to blame, Ike Ibeabuchi was fast becoming unglued. In a pathetic incident of what we now call "air rage," cops had to forcibly detain the incensed pugilist. He began to make ludicrous monetary demands of his promoters. He was tormented by demons visible only to his mother and himself. Much of his lunacy was reserved for his hapless sparring partners; one's head was split open, another almost had his leg broken.

A few months after the Tua fight, Ike abducted the son of a former girlfriend, threw him into his car, and drove straight into a concrete pillar, permanently injuring the poor boy. This atrocity earned Ike a paltry two months behind bars, but he was forced to pay an undisclosed amount of money to the boy's mother.

Incredibly, Ibeabuchi was permitted to continue boxing, where his madness seemed to work for him. He tore apart journeymen Tim Ray and Everton Davis, and became the first (and, so far, the only) man to stop "Rapid Fire" Chris Byrd. One thunderous left hook in the fifth round had Byrd down twice, and a subsequent barrage of power punches prompted the referee to put an end to the fight.

A few months later, Ike summoned a lap dancer to his hotel room at The Mirage in Las Vegas. The girl insisted on a cash payment up front, which enraged Ike to the extent that he forced her into a closet and raped her. The 6'2", 245 lb fighter brilliantly sought to evade capture by hiding in the bathroom; a few strategically directed shots of police-issue pepper spray managed to "flush" him out of there.

Ibeabuchi was subsequently sentenced to a whole heap of jail time for this misdeed, although rumors are circulating that various lawyers - who just happen to be fight fans - are working pro bono for his early release. They are reasonably confident that he will be out in six months to a year, despite his being anything but a model prisoner...."-ES BOXING

Hard Boiled HK
07-27-2006, 11:42 PM
..."Whether or not the epic slugfest with Tua was to blame, Ike Ibeabuchi was fast becoming unglued. In a pathetic incident of what we now call "air rage," cops had to forcibly detain the incensed pugilist. He began to make ludicrous monetary demands of his promoters. He was tormented by demons visible only to his mother and himself. Much of his lunacy was reserved for his hapless sparring partners; one's head was split open, another almost had his leg broken.

A few months after the Tua fight, Ike abducted the son of a former girlfriend, threw him into his car, and drove straight into a concrete pillar, permanently injuring the poor boy. This atrocity earned Ike a paltry two months behind bars, but he was forced to pay an undisclosed amount of money to the boy's mother.

Incredibly, Ibeabuchi was permitted to continue boxing, where his madness seemed to work for him. He tore apart journeymen Tim Ray and Everton Davis, and became the first (and, so far, the only) man to stop "Rapid Fire" Chris Byrd. One thunderous left hook in the fifth round had Byrd down twice, and a subsequent barrage of power punches prompted the referee to put an end to the fight.

A few months later, Ike summoned a lap dancer to his hotel room at The Mirage in Las Vegas. The girl insisted on a cash payment up front, which enraged Ike to the extent that he forced her into a closet and raped her. The 6'2", 245 lb fighter brilliantly sought to evade capture by hiding in the bathroom; a few strategically directed shots of police-issue pepper spray managed to "flush" him out of there.

Ibeabuchi was subsequently sentenced to a whole heap of jail time for this misdeed, although rumors are circulating that various lawyers - who just happen to be fight fans - are working pro bono for his early release. They are reasonably confident that he will be out in six months to a year, despite his being anything but a model prisoner...."-ES BOXING

Thanks for the info. I actually read that too. I am hoping someone might have some more in depth information regarding the mystery, especially about him hearing voices and seeing demons.

micky_knox
07-28-2006, 07:45 AM
i never got to see this guy fight......
just how good was he?
ive heard it said that id he haddent of got into so much trouble he would/could have been a very dominant h/w

slick12
08-02-2006, 05:18 AM
The Tua fight set some kind of record? I don't think he would of beaten Lennox Lewis. I also read somewhere ( will try and post the link ) that he was just a pervert rapist bully boy, and the insane thig was just try to trying and get off with a lighter setnence...

Heckler
08-02-2006, 09:06 AM
Yes they set the record for most punches thrown in a heavyweight fight since the punch-counting system was implemented. He was a huge waste of talent... he could do it all and he had it all. He was 230 pounds of pure muscle, he had brilliant stamina, an iron jaw, good handspeed, and huge punching power. Most importantly he was skilled... he had a great jab, the ability to throw in combination with accuracy, he could fight on the inside or back off and box... he had the tools required to beat Lennox and it would of been a brilliant fight. Unfortunately due to him turning into a psychopath and being incarcerated such fights never materialised and he is nothing more then another sad story.

Hard Boiled HK
08-02-2006, 07:59 PM
Perhaps President Bush will pardon him before his term is up so he can come back to fight.

Dorian
08-03-2006, 03:42 AM
how long will he be in jail for?

SnoopySmurf
08-03-2006, 09:55 AM
I remember reading another article about how his superstitious mother told him that demons were after him. They're immigrants from Africa so I think his mother was into that type of old religion. This screwed with his psyche, of course, coz he believed her.

Demorak
08-03-2006, 12:16 PM
tragic...never heard of this befor :eek:

Hard Boiled HK
08-03-2006, 03:57 PM
how long will he be in jail for?

For quite some time. If I remember correctly, at least for another 20 years. Don't quote me on that though.

the traveler
08-05-2006, 02:43 AM
****, he's from the same country as my parents and siblings, Nigeria.

Verstyle
08-05-2006, 02:47 AM
Thanks for the info. I actually read that too. I am hoping someone might have some more in depth information regarding the mystery, especially about him hearing voices and seeing demons.


glad some1 reads all that he writes.and no i dont talk to u or have ne thing bad to say about u.but geeeeeeeeez u write alot

LondonRingRules
08-05-2006, 05:33 PM
Well, lessee, first Ike fell in love with his fridge, but then his airconditioner seduced him and his car ratted him out after being spurned and beat up. So now Ike has an ongoing relationship with his commode, which while lacking electric power, is a lot smoother with snowy white porcelain.

Hard Boiled HK
08-05-2006, 05:46 PM
glad some1 reads all that he writes.and no i dont talk to u or have ne thing bad to say about u.but geeeeeeeeez u write alot

He got that article from a website and I happened to have read it before I started this thread.

Hydro
12-08-2006, 07:57 PM
The Tua fight set some kind of record? I don't think he would of beaten Lennox Lewis. I also read somewhere ( will try and post the link ) that he was just a pervert rapist bully boy, and the insane thig was just try to trying and get off with a lighter setnence...

No, I think the guy was looney-tunes.

Hydro
12-08-2006, 08:01 PM
By Tim Graham
Special to ESPN.com

LOVELOCK, Nev. -- The heavyweight landscape is no different than the dusty and desolate drive along Interstate 80 through the northern Nevada desert.

Scrub brush is the most common life form. Chunks of blown-out tires collect on the shoulder. Glitz along the roadside is just debris and shattered glass. Mirages prove to be nothing more than hot air.


Ike Ibeabuchi was upbeat about his boxing career in 1999 before he was incarcerated for battery and sexual assault.
Ike Ibeabuchi comprehends the analogies well.

The hulking Nigerian was once a fearsome contender for the heavyweight title. Now, he helplessly surveys that barren panorama every day from the confines of chain link, barbed wire and bulletproof glass.

He dreams of the day he can enliven the heavyweight division again, but not until Nevada prison officials let him leave Lovelock Correctional Center, the remote desert outpost where he has been serving five to 30 years for battery and sexual assault.

"They should give me the opportunity to define myself," Ibeabuchi says one summer morning. His Nigerian accent has subsided, but still reminds one he's many miles from home.

"Boxing is like life to me. It makes me a better person. It makes me proud of my ability, my sense of organization, my sense of being a human being.

"Boxing makes me a warrior. I strategize out everything in line, and then I execute my plan over another man. Nothing else is like that. You go to church and get on your knees to pray, but God determines the final action. In boxing, you get out exactly what you put in. It makes you feel like a God, pure."

Ibeabuchi knows he could be a factor in the division even though he hasn't competed since knocking out current IBF champ Chris Byrd 5˝ years ago. After all, Mike Tyson missed nearly four years and returned from a rape conviction to win a pair of world titles.

Some boxing experts claim Ibeabuchi is still the world's most dangerous heavyweight, an unbeaten phenom who handled heavy-fisted sluggers and slick boxers alike but often lost battles with his own emotional volatility. There was the teenage boy he nearly killed, the demons he and his mother were convinced they saw, the additional accusations of previous sex crimes.

He's dead to the boxing world even though he's only 31 years old. Everybody -- those who worked for him, made money off him and cheered for him -- stopped checking up on him. They wrote him off, but they might be surprised to discover Ibeabuchi is only one step away from leaving prison and fighting again.

"I refuse to be forgotten," Ibeabuchi says. "I refuse to be denied. I refuse to be deprived. I'm ready to get back what is mine."

Ibeabuchi's parole hearing was Monday. Earlier this year, his release date was moved up several months to Dec. 12 when he was credited with 200 days of time served while awaiting trial. There already have been preliminary talks of applying for a work furlough to let Ibeabuchi fight in the fall if parole is granted.

The most significant boost to Ibeabuchi's cause, however, could be that Sig Rogich has taken an interest in Ibeabuchi, and is expected to be his manager. A Las Vegas ad agency executive and crisis-control specialist, Rogich worked for and advised the last three Republican presidents and is a heavy party contributor.

He also helped Gov. Kenny Guinn get elected in 1998. The seven members of the Nevada Board of Parole Commissioners, the group that will decide whether Ibeabuchi leaves prison, are gubernatorial appointees.

"I don't think my involvement plays a big role," says Rogich, who helped Mike Tyson regain his Nevada boxing license after the infamous Evander Holyfield ear-biting episode. "The parole board will look at him and maybe say that it's good to see he's got a good potential business relationship waiting for him and not someone who is going to take advantage of him.

"I don't think parole boards look at who he's associated with. The doctors and wardens will determine what type of person he has been."

That will be the hardest part of all.

Inmate No. 71979

The Lovelock Correctional Center's visiting area is packed on a blast-furnace-hot summer Sunday. Wives, children, parents and buddies gather to lift spirits. As Ibeabuchi's visitor that morning, I wait patiently, left to wonder what manner of savage or man will emerge once the long-forgotten fighter gets patted down and walks through the security entrance.

Will he be the gracious gentleman many insist he is? Will the guards keep him shackled like a captive Chewbacca? What kind of shape will this heavyweight hopeful carry on his once-formidable frame?

After nearly an hour, Inmate No. 71979 arrives. He has a warm smile on his face, and while he might be a few pounds overweight, he wears it well. He appears at ease with himself, and as he strolls into the visiting area the other inmates begin to nudge their guests and point at the man who used to be ranked No. 2 in the world.

"Sorry you had to sit here so long," he says after a surprisingly gentle handshake. "I was working out, and I always wear my headphones. I didn't hear them announce I had somebody here."

Ibeabuchi looks much different than the bloated defendant who received his sentence in January 2002. Some claimed he was topping the scales at more than 300 pounds from years of inactivity. Not even close.

He says he weighs 260, merely 13 pounds more than his optimal weight. It's hard to tell for sure how trim he is through blue jeans and a dark blue, long-sleeved work shirt that barely contains his broad shoulders. But he looks healthy. He says he works out at least once a day, occasionally three times. He runs. He shadowboxes. He takes his vitamins.

"I'm like a new car that's been parked," Ibeabuchi says. "I might not be the latest model, but my engine is still fully intact."

He has a scraggly goatee and long, straightened hair that turns curly again at his neckline. The desert sun has noticeably darkened his skin, the tan lines from his wristwatch revealing a far lighter shade.

"I'm grateful I've spent this time here," Ibeabuchi says. "I'm ready to put the world on my shoulders. ... I appreciate the serenity, the calm I acquired in prison. If not for the stain on my name, there's nothing wrong with taking a five-year break, especially when people in boxing didn't appreciate my efforts then."

Ibeabuchi's demeanor is an eerie mix of intensity and charm. He slips into his notoriously unsettling, faraway stare when he speaks of matters that stoke his passions. He flashes a disarming cherub's grin when he's not taking himself so seriously, "Oh, Lord have mercy" his lighthearted refrain.

Mercy, however, is something Ibeabuchi knew little about before prison.

Inside the ring, he was unforgiving. Outside of it, he was despicable.

Ibeabuchi planned on joining the Nigerian military before he witnessed a life-altering event: Buster Douglas knocking out Mike Tyson in 1990. Ibeabuchi took up boxing, twice beating countryman and eventual 1996 bronze medalist Duncan Dokiwari. He emigrated to the Dallas area with his mother in 1993, won the Dallas and Texas Golden Gloves tournaments in 1994 and turned pro.

He annihilated his opponents, compiling a 20-0 record with 15 knockouts.

"He went into the ring like a bull with steam coming out of his nostrils," says former HBO Sports executive Lou DiBella, who now works as a promoter. "It was vintage 1985, 1986, 1987 Mike Tyson."

Ibeabuchi easily dealt rising contender David Tua his first defeat in a blistering 12 rounds that broke the CompuBox heavyweight record with 1,730 punches thrown; Ibeabuchi threw 975 of them, the second-most tallied by a heavyweight. Ibeabuchi was even more impressive against Byrd, the best defensive heavyweight around, dropping him twice before the bout was stopped in the fifth round.

"I had rage when I fought Chris Byrd," Ibeabuchi says. "I was militant. I was hitting him to hurt him."

He had sullied two perfect records in the span of four fights, but those close to him knew he was doing a fine job of ruining his own career.

"He was the best heavyweight prospect I've ever seen," DiBella said. "He had a world of ferocity. He had hand speed. He had a chin.

"He had everything, but he didn't have himself. He was never mentally sound."

Hydro
12-08-2006, 08:02 PM
'The President'

Ibeabuchi has come to admit he's a flawed human being. Five years in lockup have a way of eroding the vanity, the misdirected blame, the false justifications.

"I'm more humiliated than (concerned with) spending time in prison," Ibeabuchi says. "I have a moral standard. I'm not perfect. I'm a human being. I was the person preaching on TV and reciting passages from the Bible. But I was a hypocrite."

Rage was the common denominator in Ibeabuchi's pattern of outlandish, often criminal, behavior. It made him act irrationally, usually putting others' lives in grave danger. He has been accused of attempted rape, attempted suicide and attempted murder.

"He was seriously damaged emotional goods even before he exploded," HBO boxing analyst Larry Merchant says. "My belief, when he got locked up, was that boxing dodged another bullet."

Distraught over a perceived snub in the WBC rankings two months after he beat Tua, Ibeabuchi slammed his car into a concrete pillar on Interstate 35 north of Austin, Texas. With him was an ex-girlfriend's 15-year-old son.

The boy suffered "numerous injuries" from the accident "and will never walk normally again," according to the criminal complaint. Ibeabuchi was charged with kidnapping and attempted murder, but the courts concluded he was trying to commit suicide, and he was sentenced to 120 days after pleading guilty to false imprisonment. He paid a $500,000 civil settlement.

"It was a very frustrating case because what he did wasn't as clearly criminal as what I expected him to get involved with down the line," said District Attorney John Bradley, who prosecuted Ibeabuchi.

"I fully expected that his contact with the criminal justice system had not ended with our county. We weren't able to get him examined, but it sure seemed to me -- even if he was a heavyweight boxer looking at making millions of dollars -- that he should have been committed to a psychiatric community and treated."

That incident, Merchant says, "began to peel away the skin of the onion."

Ibeabuchi developed a new persona based on his nickname, "The President." At times when he was being churlish or refusing to complete a simple requirement such as attending a weigh-in, his handlers would appeal to The President's regal nature by convincing him it was the noble thing to do.

"There were times when he thought he was really a president," DiBella says. "He would get into these mental states where he insisted on people calling him The President. It was his alter ago, where 'I am The President,' not of the United States, but maybe the world."

Stories began to circulate that both Ibeabuchi and his mother both were seeing demons. Promoter Cedric Kushner says Ibeabuchi on two occasions had to be literally dragged onto airplanes before fights because of perceived demonic forces.

Then there was the time Ibeabuchi wielded a knife during a dinner meeting in New York to discuss a possible three-fight HBO deal.

"We were having a fine meal at a nice restaurant," Kushner says, "and mid-course Ike picked up a big carving knife, slammed it into the table and screamed 'They knew it! They knew it! The belts belong to me! Why don't they just give them back.'

"That was a peculiar experience," Kushner says. "That wasn't the type of conduct I expected to romance the guy from HBO. (Ibeabuchi) was like a Viking."

Three months after his decisive triumph over Byrd, Ibeabuchi had more trouble at an airport, and this time it wasn't the demons that refused to let him on board.

His flight out of Dallas-Fort Worth was overbooked, and he didn't take kindly to the news. As he stormed wildly through the terminal, police threatened him with pepper spray.

"You better shoot me," he replied. They sprayed him in the eyes and handcuffed him.

That wouldn't be the last time Ibeabuchi was pepper-sprayed. The next occasion would mark the stinging end of his freedom.

'My Little Secret'

Ibeabuchi never cared for the dating game.

"I feel women should bow to me," he says. "I have a great ego in going after women. I'm not a person to rape a woman because I'm of the belief she should want to be with me. If she doesn't want to be with me, I don't want to have sex with her."

He admits he has a weakness for prostitutes. They're easier to deal with than girlfriends. They're always willing, and they're disposable.

"I have had sex with escorts many times," he says. "It's no strings attached. I paid with checks and credit cards.

"It was a guilty pleasure. When we have secrets, God has a way of telling you 'I saw what you did.' I thought I could get away with it, but God had to make my little secret public."

In July 1999, he was staying at The Mirage Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas when he phoned Room Service -- not the folks who bring food to the door, but a local escort service that comes a-knockin' with something entirely different.

Ibeabuchi insists the argument was over the form of payment, that the dispatcher told him a personal check was OK. The 21-year-old woman said she was there to strip and nothing else. She claimed he attacked her in the walk-in closet after she demanded to be paid up front.

"He invites her up to his room and begins to get physical with her," says Christopher Lalli, a Clark County chief deputy district attorney. It got loud enough that people in the adjoining room notified hotel security.

"When they enter the room," Lalli says, "a woman, naked from the waist down, is running toward them. These are three strangers, and she ran right into their arms."

Ibeabuchi barricaded himself in the bathroom, and police discharged pepper spray under the door to coax his surrender.

"How can I have the audacity to rape someone I'm paying to have sex with?" Ibeabuchi asks. "In Nigeria, I wouldn't be in prison for what I did. The system here (in the U.S.) makes sure someone gets punished whenever a woman cries. This was a call girl, an escort."

Ibeabuchi's defense faced the further difficulty of the Clark County DA's reopening of a similar sexual assault allegation from eight months earlier that took place next door to The Mirage, at sister-property Treasure Island.

Still, he was released on bail and placed on house arrest -- able to train and fight again until his trial -- but he was remanded after two more sexual-assault allegations surfaced in Arizona.

"The troubling thing for us was this was not an isolated incident," Lalli says.

Lalli says the case against Ibeabuchi's crimes at The Mirage was solid. There was physical evidence, eyewitness testimony, a pattern of unacceptable behavior.

"It was evidence you don't have nine times out of 10 in these cases when you go to trial," Lalli says.

But Ibeabuchi was deemed incompetent to stand trial and was sent to a state facility for the mentally ill. Medical experts concluded he exhibited bipolar disorder, and a judge granted permission to force-medicate him. Eight months later, 2˝ years after his arrest, he was ruled cogent enough to plea.

He entered an Alford plea, conceding the prosecution had enough evidence to convict him while not admitting guilt. Had he gone to trial and been found guilty of rape, he could have received 10 years to life in prison, but instead he got two to 10 years for battery with intent to commit a crime and three to 20 years for attempted sexual assault, to be served consecutively.

"We felt confident he was going to spend a good chunk of time in prison and then get kicked out of the country," Lalli says.

Ibeabuchi claims he now has a better understanding of what's right and what's wrong. He has had five years to contemplate his sins.

"I was getting away with it," Ibeabuchi says of his old sexual habits. "I thought call girls or escorts were prostitutes. I thought they were choosing to have sex with you for money. I have found I was in error, and now I'm making amends."

Hydro
12-08-2006, 08:02 PM
'A Scary, Scary Individual'

Many elements are in place for Ibeabuchi to be paroled. The board ruled favorably two years ago when he was up for consideration on his lesser charge.

By all accounts, he has been a model prisoner. He seems to have a positive relationship with the guards. He claims the only mark against him on his prison record is for making an unauthorized phone call.

He has received college credits in psychology, philosophy, business math, personal finance, English and computer technology. He says he hasn't needed to take any medication since he was sentenced in January 2002.

On June 22, Ibeabuchi faced a psychological review panel -- required for sexual offenders eligible for parole -- and was "not found to be a high risk to re-offend."

Ibeabuchi's public parole hearing was before three commissioners via video conference from Carson City. The victim had the right to testify. The decision will be made in a closed meeting and announced later.

Even if he's granted parole, Ibeabuchi will face another hurdle: As an immigrant convicted of a felony, he will face immediate deportation. Rogich is hopeful Ibeabuchi will be permitted to remain in the U.S., but concedes that luxury could be difficult given the Department of Homeland Security's restrictive guidelines.

Lalli expressed alarm at the prospect of Ibeabuchi's discharge from Lovelock.

"It scares me to death," Lalli says. "He is a scary, scary individual. The thought of him walking around on the street unsupervised is disconcerting."

Who's The Baddest?

The visitor asks Ibeabuchi if, after all these years of self-examination, he still possesses the rage that made him so ruthless in the ring.

"I have my rage still," Ibeabuchi replies, his chin still fixed toward the distance, but his eyes slowly shifting to the man across the table. "None of my fights will go as long as the number of years I spend in prison."

"I wouldn't want to be the first guy Ike fights when he gets out jail -- for a lot of reasons," said Ibeabuchi's former manager, Houston-based attorney Steve Munisteri. "A lot of pent-up frustration is going to come out in those gloves."

Ibeabuchi's goals seem quite lofty. They consist of unifying the world titles, beating the Klitschko brothers on consecutive nights, luring Lennox Lewis out of retirement and facing Tyson in the ultimate malfeasance matchup.

"My rap sheet is similar to Mike Tyson's rap sheet," Ibeabuchi says. "It would be the biggest fight of all time. People want to see who really is the baddest guy."

More immediately, if the parole board smiles upon him, Ibeabuchi's goal is to fight a top-15 contender.

How much can a 31-year-old, slightly overweight fighter, rebounding from a 5˝-year layoff, truly accomplish?

"You never lose your power, and he never was beat up," Munisteri says. "If the heavyweight division remains in the state it is today and he gets himself in shape, who knows what might happen? Can a guy at 31, who's taken no abuse, do it? Yeah, it's possible."

And is he really 31? Dominican baseball players aren't the only athletes who lie about their age.

Merchant doesn't consider Ibeabuchi's age nearly as much as his psyche.

"He could go out there in two or three fights and think he's king of the world again," Merchant says. "But he's got to show that he can deal with success, that he can deal with what comes with winning fights. Can he handle the jungle that is boxing? Can he handle the money?"

Ibeabuchi guesses he lost around $80 million in purses while he was incarcerated. Munisteri ventures a career-earning estimate at closer to $500 million.

He'll never get that back, but as a curiosity in a sport desperate for box-office draws, he shouldn't have any difficulty making a nice living under boxing's big top.

"Long-term, I think he can be heavyweight champion of the world. He's very talented, very articulate and very intelligent," says Rogich, who likely will organize Ibeabuchi's affairs. "Short-term, he needs to make sure he has a long-term plan. He needs to make sure his life is on an even keel. I think we can get him there."

An Unbroken Spirit

Ibeabuchi slumps back into his chair and, again, stares silently into the distance. It's now late afternoon, and there's nothing left to talk about. The boxing, the crimes, the parole, the cell, the future, the past. It has all been covered.

Then, in a flash, he slaps his meaty hands on the table as an expression of excitement comes across his dark face. His eyes are still fixed dead ahead, and he speaks as though he were talking more to himself than to anyone else.

"People gotta get one thing straight: Because I'm locked up (they think) I'm dead and forgotten," Ibeabuchi says, his head starting to nod slightly. "But my spirit, my confidence and my faith are up. No matter how long they keep me here, that can't break my spirit.

"This is a mental fall that requires a mental rise. This is a test. This is nothing compared to what other great men have gone through. I'll pass this test."

juan110470
01-27-2008, 06:01 PM
If and when this guy is released from jail, he will in all likelyhood be deported back to his country. He is not a US citizen so therefore he can't stay.

If he comes back to fight (which I doubt), he will have to fight outside of the USA where the purses are not even close to what they are in the USA. Edwin Valero will tell you all about this.

But the guy was definetely a monster in the ring. He could do it all.

K-Nan
01-27-2008, 09:26 PM
Ibeabuchi:
I believe what the fans really want to know, is whether I am in shape. The answer is yes. I’m in shape to fight right now. My boxing program includes shadow boxing and the study of “Psycho-pugilism”. God willing, I shall introduce the world of boxing to my new supreme delicacy Psycho-pugilism (The Food of The Warrior Boxing God) upon my eventual return to the ring.

Yeah... He's a character.

Juniorvt
01-29-2008, 02:25 AM
stamina, speed, chin he had it all but his power was overrated i'm afraid

slickPUG
02-23-2008, 03:10 AM
Ike was really something. A bigger man was fast hands, a rock hard chin, good skills, strong as a bull, excellent stamina...he was very athletic, and coordinated, and built like a tank. I really thought he was going to become the heavyweight champion. Compare Ike to some of the heavyweight prospects of right now that some people are getting excited about, he would have blasted all of them. He fought a young, motivated David Tua, stood in with him for 12 rounds and battled it out, not trying to be slick and outbox him, but stood in and traded, he ate some big shots and barely blinked, and he destroyed a young, very fast &slick Chris Byrd, pretty easily, just by pressuring him, and hitting him all over, not getting caught up in Byrd's game. At the time, I thought he had a shot to beat Lennox Lewis, but we'll never know, wasted talent, for sure. Back when Ike was fighting, I remember reading about a possible fight with Michael Grant, and the winner to face Lewis....Ike woulda plowed Grant down, and the Lewis-Ibeabuchi bout might have happened, I think it would have been one hell of a scrap. The man was a loose cannon though, I think was Ring magazine who wanted to do an interview with him, but he wouldn't do it unless they called him the president when they talked to him over the phone....he flipped out on his sparring partner Ezra Sellers as well at one point, I think over a cut he got in sparring, and blamed Sellers, saying he was wearing a ring under his boxing glove or some crazy crap like that. Too bad. I read a little about him hearing voices (he thought were God's), and seeing "demons"...though I don't really recall much about that.

phallus
02-23-2008, 03:15 AM
stamina, speed, chin he had it all but his power was overrated i'm afraid

Ike was really something. A bigger man was fast hands, a rock hard chin, good skills, strong as a bull, excellent stamina...he was very athletic, and coordinated, and built like a tank. I really thought he was going to become the heavyweight champion. Compare Ike to some of the heavyweight prospects of right now that some people are getting excited about, he would have blasted all of them. He fought a young, motivated David Tua, stood in with him for 12 rounds and battled it out, not trying to be slick and outbox him, but stood in and traded, he ate some big shots and barely blinked, and he destroyed a young, very fast &slick Chris Byrd, pretty easily, just by pressuring him, and hitting him all over, not getting caught up in Byrd's game. At the time, I thought he had a shot to beat Lennox Lewis, but we'll never know, wasted talent, for sure. Back when Ike was fighting, I remember reading about a possible fight with Michael Grant, and the winner to face Lewis....Ike woulda plowed Grant down, and the Lewis-Ibeabuchi bout might have happened, I think it would have been one hell of a scrap. The man was a loose cannon though, I think was Ring magazine who wanted to do an interview with him, but he wouldn't do it unless they called him the president when they talked to him over the phone....he flipped out on his sparring partner Ezra Sellers as well at one point, I think over a cut he got in sparring, and blamed Sellers, saying he was wearing a ring under his boxing glove or some crazy crap like that. Too bad. I read a little about him hearing voices (he thought were God's), and seeing "demons"...though I don't really recall much about that.

i was a big fan of ike's, he had skills and speed and ****ing granite chin, tua couldn't knock him out, but the man is mentally unstable. if he'd been hw champ he would have still raped a hooker and beat up a room full of cops though

slickPUG
02-23-2008, 03:21 AM
I agree with ya

duffgun
02-23-2008, 07:08 AM
Ike was really something. A bigger man was fast hands, a rock hard chin, good skills, strong as a bull, excellent stamina...he was very athletic, and coordinated, and built like a tank. I really thought he was going to become the heavyweight champion. Compare Ike to some of the heavyweight prospects of right now that some people are getting excited about, he would have blasted all of them. He fought a young, motivated David Tua, stood in with him for 12 rounds and battled it out, not trying to be slick and outbox him, but stood in and traded, he ate some big shots and barely blinked, and he destroyed a young, very fast &slick Chris Byrd, pretty easily, just by pressuring him, and hitting him all over, not getting caught up in Byrd's game. At the time, I thought he had a shot to beat Lennox Lewis, but we'll never know, wasted talent, for sure. Back when Ike was fighting, I remember reading about a possible fight with Michael Grant, and the winner to face Lewis....Ike woulda plowed Grant down, and the Lewis-Ibeabuchi bout might have happened, I think it would have been one hell of a scrap. The man was a loose cannon though, I think was Ring magazine who wanted to do an interview with him, but he wouldn't do it unless they called him the president when they talked to him over the phone....he flipped out on his sparring partner Ezra Sellers as well at one point, I think over a cut he got in sparring, and blamed Sellers, saying he was wearing a ring under his boxing glove or some crazy crap like that. Too bad. I read a little about him hearing voices (he thought were God's), and seeing "demons"...though I don't really recall much about that.

I think Ike vs Lewis would have made a great trilogy.

Onslow.
02-23-2008, 09:20 AM
That would have been interesting, however I wonder if Lennox would start wondering why he always had to fight pyschopathic rapists all the time.

Brother Blues
02-23-2008, 10:39 AM
A sad waste of talent...he and Tony Ayala are the poster boys for 'what could have been'.
Both had Hall of Fame talent...especially Ayala.Ike,if he had a sound mind would beat any heavyweight today.Wlad Klitschko would have fainted in his presence...

But...as the Despair inc. saying goes,"sometimes the meaning of your life is a warning to others"...sadly.

Feint
02-23-2008, 02:22 PM
But...as the Despair inc. saying goes,"sometimes the meaning of your life is a warning to others"...sadly.



Good quote.

Mental illness is sad. Unfortunately I have a feeling because he was a boxer and people tend to associate boxers with eccentric behavior his illness was probably initially ignored.

However, having said that mental illness or not, he deserved to go to prison for what he did.

Jim Jeffries
02-23-2008, 02:52 PM
Shouldn't Ike be getting out about now? Be funny if he made a comeback.