View Full Version : Recommend me a book...


TheHoff!
06-26-2006, 11:35 AM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)

* FeistyWench *
06-26-2006, 11:37 AM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)
be a little specific about what kinds of things you usually like to read. i am an avid reader and read about 25 novels a year. lol! :o

K-DOGG
06-26-2006, 11:40 AM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)

"Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West" by Gregory McGuire


Great spin on the Wizard of Oz from the Witch's point of view. Well written, witty, and very creative, IMO. One of the most entertaining works of fiction I've ever read.

xzworks
06-26-2006, 11:41 AM
robert fulghum

TheHoff!
06-26-2006, 11:43 AM
be a little specific about what kinds of things you usually like to read. i am an avid reader and read about 25 novels a year. lol! :o
Ok I'm not really into horror or steven king or trashy romance books or **** like that...erm the last few books I've read have been The Glass Palace by Amitav Ghosh, Gorky Park by Martin Cruz Smith and The Time Travellers Wife by Audrey Niffenegger and I really loved those 3 books, if that gives you any kind of idea of what I like. Like I said I'm not too fussed about genre as long as its a gripping story and well written.

Hope that helps.

Undefeated
06-26-2006, 11:43 AM
How about this book?

Teddy atlas's book..

From the streets to the ring.

I got it.. It's a good book. Haven't read in like a week cause i been doing mad ****.. But ima read it later on...

Good book by the way...

TheHoff!
06-26-2006, 11:53 AM
"Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West" by Gregory McGuire


Great spin on the Wizard of Oz from the Witch's point of view. Well written, witty, and very creative, IMO. One of the most entertaining works of fiction I've ever read.
Sounds good. I'll check that out...thanks.

And the teddy atlas one...I've read a few boxing books recently and im not really looking to get another one or anything non-fiction at the moment. Teddy Atlas is an interesting guy though so I might get it at some point...thanks.

* FeistyWench *
06-26-2006, 11:53 AM
Ok I'm not really into horror or steven king or trashy romance books or **** like that...erm the last few books I've read have been The Glass Palace by Amitav Ghosh, Gorky Park by Martin Cruz Smith and The Time Travellers Wife by Audrey Niffenegger and I really loved those 3 books, if that gives you any kind of idea of what I like. Like I said I'm not too fussed about genre as long as its a gripping story and well written.

Hope that helps.
i read time travelers wife. it was a cool concept.
it made time travel seem not so glamorous.
i thought it was cool that his daughter was able to asee him after he died because he had went into the future when he was younger.

* FeistyWench *
06-26-2006, 11:57 AM
Angels & Demons by Dan Brown was really good, IMO.
although it involves religion to some extent, it was more about stopping this antimatter bomb. it was a fast-paced, suspense book and very unpredicatble. it was a very good read.

TheHoff!
06-26-2006, 11:59 AM
i read time travelers wife. it was a cool concept.
it made time travel seem not so glamorous.
i thought it was cool that his daughter was able to asee him after he died because he had went into the future when he was younger.
Yeah my mate recommended it to me and i thought it was gonna be a bit cheesy but it was really original and quite a moving story. I felt sad for Clare when Henry died :( and you're right, the daughter seeing him after he died was a nice touch.

Apparently they're gonna make it into a film so I'm looking forward to seeing that.

TheHoff!
06-26-2006, 12:05 PM
Angels & Demons by Dan Brown was really good, IMO.
although it involves religion to some extent, it was more about stopping this antimatter bomb. it was a fast-paced, suspense book and very unpredicatble. it was a very good read.
I read The Da vinci code by dan brown and that was great. IMO he's not that good of a writer, in that he aint really got a flair for the language and uses cliches and **** in his writing style a lot, but he does tell a great story and keeps it suspenseful...so i'll probably like that...thanks.

* FeistyWench *
06-26-2006, 12:05 PM
Yeah my mate recommended it to me and i thought it was gonna be a bit cheesy but it was really original and quite a moving story. I felt sad for Clare when Henry died :( and you're right, the daughter seeing him after he died was a nice touch.

Apparently they're gonna make it into a film so I'm looking forward to seeing that.
i know, it just sucked that he KNEW he was going to die and there was nothing he could do. :o and that her family in the past had shot him. :(
my heart went out to her.

i admit, i cried a bit. lol!

* FeistyWench *
06-26-2006, 12:06 PM
I read The Da vinci code by dan brown and that was great. IMO he's not that good of a writer, in that he aint really got a flair for the language and uses cliches and **** in his writing style a lot, but he does tell a great story and keeps it suspenseful...so i'll probably like that...thanks.
IMO it is better than the DaVinci Code.
it was a great story and VERY suspensful.

TheHoff!
06-26-2006, 12:06 PM
i admit, i cried a bit. lol!
haha...me too :o

TheHoff!
06-26-2006, 12:08 PM
IMO it is better than the DaVinci Code.
it was a great story and VERY suspensful.
I'll definately like it then. Thanks I'll get that.

RAESAAD
06-26-2006, 12:09 PM
"YOU" By Ricky Roberts III He is a highschool friend of mine who wrote this book check it out.....it is a good some what of a self-help or motivational book.

TheHoff!
06-26-2006, 12:35 PM
"YOU" By Ricky Roberts III He is a highschool friend of mine who wrote this book check it out.....it is a good some what of a self-help or motivational book.
I'm not usually interested in self help books as i think i am damn near perfect already...but truth be told I am lazy ****er so maybe a bit of motivational help would be good.

RAESAAD
06-26-2006, 12:36 PM
I'm not usually interested in self help books as i think i am damn near perfect already...but truth be told I am lazy ****er so maybe a bit of motivational help would be good.
LOL.....It is a paper back and only about 100 pages.It has alot of good **** in it.Just a suggestion everyone can always use a little uplifting in their life.

* FeistyWench *
06-26-2006, 12:37 PM
personally, i have a hard time getting thrugh self-help or motivational books. not that interested, except if it is user friendly/practical (not drawn out theories or explanations) and involves a parenting problem i am having like toilet training for toddlers or something.

RAESAAD
06-26-2006, 12:39 PM
personally, i have a hard time getting thrugh self-help or motivational books. not that interested, except if it is user friendly/practical (not drawn out theories or explanations) and involves a parenting problem i am having like toilet training for toddlers or something.
It is more of a life story than self help.

* FeistyWench *
06-26-2006, 12:41 PM
It is more of a life story than self help.
yea, those are better.

platinummatt
06-26-2006, 12:57 PM
how about way of the peaceful warrior. Its an interesting book, philosohically based, and made into a story which is based on an experience of the own authors Its great I really liked it I read it in 2 days

Crumble
06-26-2006, 02:18 PM
The Stand : Stephen King.

There is a made for TV movie, but it is kind of ****ty. Its your typical end of the world, good vs evil book. It been my favourite book since I was 10.

BBKing
06-27-2006, 12:46 PM
You can't go wrong with Ken Follett. His last book Whiteout was awesome.

Rockin'
06-27-2006, 05:26 PM
The best book ever written about boxing, "Beyond The Ring." Jefferey T Sammons

Rockin' :boxing:

SonnyG8R
06-27-2006, 07:45 PM
The best book ever written about boxing, "Beyond The Ring." Jefferey T Sammons

Rockin' :boxing:

Best boxing book ever huh?

I'll have to check it out.

One of my favorite classics is Candide by Voltaire.

Rockin'
06-27-2006, 07:49 PM
Best boxing book ever huh?

I'll have to check it out.

One of my favorite classics is Candide by Voltaire.

Easily in my opinion it is. I have read everything that I could find through the years and this one just stands out strong.

Candide I have never heard of. What kind of read is it?

Rockin' :boxing:

SonnyG8R
06-27-2006, 08:07 PM
Easily in my opinion it is. I have read everything that I could find through the years and this one just stands out strong.

Candide I have never heard of. What kind of read is it?

Rockin' :boxing:

Well Voltaire was a French philosopher and author. He was one of the great Enlightenment period thinkers. So the book Candide is a social commentary but because it is satirical it reads like a comedy. It's both entertaining and thought provoking.

Rockin'
06-27-2006, 08:17 PM
Well Voltaire was a French philosopher and author. He was one of the great Enlightenment period thinkers. So the book Candide is a social commentary but because it is satirical it reads like a comedy. It's both entertaining and thought provoking.


Ill keep that one in mind. Thanks for the lead.

Rockin' :boxing:

Rockin'
06-27-2006, 08:27 PM
Also, I really liked "The Power of One". Dont recall the author. It wasnt straight out about boxing I found as I kept turning the pages. But it was a really good book that stuck with me through the years.

Rockin' :boxing:

SonnyG8R
06-27-2006, 08:30 PM
Seabiscut was pretty good.

If you are into sci-fi at all Frank Herbert's Dune kicks ass!!

SonnyG8R
06-27-2006, 11:18 PM
Could Harry Potter be killed off in Book #7. Appearantly it is very possible. According to JK Rowling 2 main characters will bite the dust in book 7. Check it out.

J.K.Rowling was today interviewed on the Richard and Judy show. Amongst other things she talked about book 7 - stating that it is NOT yet finished but she has added two more deaths she didn't originally plan.


J.K.Rowling interview highlights:


- Book 7 is NOT finished but she is well into it

- The final chapter for book 7 has changed slightly – 2 more people have died than she originally planned and 1 other person has got a reprieve

- Jo first wrote the final chapter in 1990

- Says she loved teaching teens and draws on memories of them and her own experiences for Harry and his friends

- Judy is a Hr/R and H/G shipper – she wants them to wed!

- She’s never been tempted to kill Harry off before book 7 – however she can understand the mentality behind killing a main character so no-one else can write sequels

- She won’t say whether Harry lives or dies

- The essential premise for Potter was a boy wizard who didn’t know he was a wizard

- She has regretted writing some parts where she may have boxed herself in, earlier in the series

- For the first 3 books she was in total denial about her and the series’ fame – “like a rabbit caught in headlights” – the freakiest thing is seeing casual references to HP in press – she was shocked when bludgers were referenced in a Wimbeldon write-up featuring Venus Williams

- Says she is wealthy but many figures are falsely reported

- Sudden fame did make her clam up

- Jessica, her daughter, has adapted well – kids have tried getting book titles out of her before

- Dating wasn't tricky because of fame but because she was a single mother

- Death became such a big theme in the books after her own mother died

- Jo admires the authors who go out on top while people still want more

- She’s written half of another children’s book for younger kids – it’s a much smaller book

- Jo says Ron is generally more popular than Harry -- remembers seeing an unofficial poll on a fansite reflecting this

- If she came across a boggart it'd be similar to Mrs Weasley's where she saw her children dead

- She thinks the person who she based Lockhart on probably doesn't realise she wasn't being nice in basing a character on him

- She made up the rules for Quidditch in about half an hour -- after having an argument with an ex-boyfriend -- this is where she thinks she got bludgers from

Mech.
06-28-2006, 03:38 AM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)

Paco's Story
Lakota Woman
Famous All over Town

3 of the best books Ive ever read.

Mick Hucknall
06-28-2006, 11:35 AM
Angels & Demons by Dan Brown was really good, IMO.
although it involves religion to some extent, it was more about stopping this antimatter bomb. it was a fast-paced, suspense book and very unpredicatble. it was a very good read.

I'm halfway through reading that book at the moment after just finishing the da vinci code

* FeistyWench *
06-28-2006, 12:21 PM
I'm halfway through reading that book at the moment after just finishing the da vinci code
let me know what ya think after you're finished.

JDizzle79
06-28-2006, 12:42 PM
"Rule by Secrecy" Jim Marrs

Explosivo
06-28-2006, 02:47 PM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)

I like John Stossell and he has a new book out. I read his last one and it was really good. This new one is called "Why Everything You Know Is Wrong". And it talks about how all the **** you learn about products from commercials and marketing is pretty much all bull****.

TheHoff!
06-28-2006, 06:42 PM
Thanks for all the recommendations. I got a whole list of books to get through now lol
The Stand : Stephen King.

There is a made for TV movie, but it is kind of ****ty. Its your typical end of the world, good vs evil book. It been my favourite book since I was 10.
I think I saw that. A plague annihilated most of the earths population or something...and even though it was a bit **** I really liked it :o

I like John Stossell and he has a new book out. I read his last one and it was really good. This new one is called "Why Everything You Know Is Wrong". And it talks about how all the **** you learn about products from commercials and marketing is pretty much all bull****.
Have you seen a documentary called The Corporation? It's basically a history of the corporation and about how much power they have over us and how they have abused that power. It says that corporations have been given the legal rights of a person but if they were a person they would be classified as a dangerous psychopath. It then describes the signs that categorise a psychopath like "a callous unconcern for the feelings and safety of others, an incapacity to experience guilt, an ingrained habit of lying for profit" and gives examples of many corporations that have acted in these ways. It's ****ing fascinating.

One of the case studies describes how an American computer company (IBM I think) sold its systems to the nazi's so they could process the jews they were killing in the holocaust, and how IBM went to the holocaust camps to service the systems on a monthly basis.

The Raging Bull
06-29-2006, 12:21 PM
You should read muhammad ali:his life and times by thomas hauser.

A great read and a real in depth account of his life.

* FeistyWench *
09-02-2006, 06:35 PM
"Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West" by Gregory McGuire


Great spin on the Wizard of Oz from the Witch's point of view. Well written, witty, and very creative, IMO. One of the most entertaining works of fiction I've ever read.
K-Dogg we need to talk about this book. i don;t want to turn this thread into a book club :o but i am over half way through it and i just don;t get it. maybe it is too politically entrenched? so many people LOVED this book, so i am thinking that maybe it is just me and my faltering brain? they say when you are pregnant you lose a few IQ points temporarily. lol!

PATO 1
09-02-2006, 10:07 PM
the art of duckin by big poppa pump


how to lose a girl to a better lookin guy, by the raging bull


edit ::: Momma's boy - Lennox Lewis

Exige Jr
09-02-2006, 11:24 PM
^^ Budget joke.

If you wanna read something good, then read World War I literacy. That stuff is pretty emotional. Ill tell you the truth, books dont appear on the top of my priorities list, but I did enjoy some of my A-level English course in which we checked loads of literacy related to the First World War. Its funny because I live right near an old War airport, a really famous one, and I think to myself "so German, American and English planes flew right over here. And if I rewound 50 odd years I would have seen them going across here with all sorts of chaos going on". Then again im a bit of a deep thinker when I get going...

But yeah. War literacy. Perhaps Regeneration is the most well known of those types of books. Or war poetry... war poetry is emotive.

K-DOGG
09-03-2006, 01:46 AM
K-Dogg we need to talk about this book. i don;t want to turn this thread into a book club :o but i am over half way through it and i just don;t get it. maybe it is too politically entrenched? so many people LOVED this book, so i am thinking that maybe it is just me and my faltering brain? they say when you are pregnant you lose a few IQ points temporarily. lol!

LOL!!!! Darlin, it's okay if it's not your cup of tea. What I found funny about it was the political implications....that the "good guys" were in reality...or at least from the "witch's" perspective....were the bad guys.

My particular sense of humor just thought the irony and the "completely opposite" story was funny because it was like saying Mother Goose was a Whorehouse Madame. Stuff like that, that's just so 180 degrees around from what is conventional amusese me.

It doesn't mean your brain is "frazzled"...it just means your sense of humor is different from everybody elses. :lol1:

Just kidding. It just means that the humor in that book isn't in tune with your particular funny bone.

But, if you want to talk more about it, I'm curious what you didn't like about it because I did think it was hysterical. I just probably won't be logged back on until Monday afternoon.

Later. :D

MetalVomit
09-04-2006, 12:12 AM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)


American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis.

TheHoff!
09-10-2006, 04:34 PM
But yeah. War literacy. Perhaps Regeneration is the most well known of those types of books
I've read the Regeneration trilogy and I think all of the novels Pat Barker has wrote. They're good books. She really goes deep into the psychology of the characters.

American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis.
I've read that^...and all Bret Easton Ellis' novels up to Glamorama. I couldnt finish that book and got bored of him after that.

* FeistyWench *
06-13-2007, 10:47 AM
Does anyone have books to recommend?

Oasis_Lad
06-13-2007, 10:54 AM
Does anyone have books to recommend?

The "Interpretation of Murder" by Jed Rubenfeld.


http://www.interpretationofmurder.com/
http://www.amazon.com/Interpretation-Murder-Novel-Jed-Rubenfeld/dp/0312427050/ref=sr_1_1/105-3678078-2445214?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181742760&sr=1-1

porlie
06-13-2007, 12:05 PM
Does anyone have books to recommend?

Bernard O'Mahoney - Bonded By Blood

Horace Silver - Judas Pig

Albert DeMeo - For The Sins Of My Father

porlie
06-13-2007, 12:07 PM
I read about 100 books a year

Oasis_Lad
06-13-2007, 12:09 PM
I read about 100 books a year

What's your favourite novel of all time, Porlie?

Mine has to be - 1984 by George Orwell.

porlie
06-13-2007, 12:32 PM
What's your favourite novel of all time, Porlie?

Mine has to be - 1984 by George Orwell.

I dont have 1 paticular fave, theres loads I've read and think alot of and 1984 is one of them mate.

fraidycat
06-14-2007, 02:35 AM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)

The Message by Eugene H. Peterson

phallus
06-14-2007, 02:41 AM
read Lolita, after that book i almost changed my name to humbert humbert

TheHoff!
06-14-2007, 03:22 AM
The "Interpretation of Murder" by Jed Rubenfeld.


http://www.interpretationofmurder.com/
http://www.amazon.com/Interpretation-Murder-Novel-Jed-Rubenfeld/dp/0312427050/ref=sr_1_1/105-3678078-2445214?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181742760&sr=1-1

I bought that book the other day. Once I finish the book I'm reading at the moment I'll get stuck into that one laddie.

mgkirkpatrick
06-14-2007, 03:38 AM
Also, I really liked "The Power of One". Dont recall the author. It wasnt straight out about boxing I found as I kept turning the pages. But it was a really good book that stuck with me through the years.

Rockin' :boxing:

this is probably my favourite book of all time. the author is bryce courtenay a south african who now lives in a australian. awesome read. if you like that one there is the sequel 'Tandia' which isnt as good.. after reading this one i got through a lot of courtenay's work. Four fires and whitethorn were awesome.

i never thought id get into fantasy books but i think everyone should try reading 'Magician' by raymond e feist before making up their minds. unreal.


i could **** on forever, having a librarian for a mother is helpful.

but ill go with THE POWER OF ONE as my recommendation.


(p.s i assume you've read catch22? i think you'd appreciate the humour)

TheHoff!
06-14-2007, 03:46 AM
Cheers Mr Patrick, I'll look out for 'the power of one'...and nah I aint read catch 22, it's one of those books that I've always meant to read but never got round to. I will soon though.

Mech.
06-14-2007, 05:23 AM
looking over my recommendations, I still strongly recommend Paco's Story.Its cynical, gritty, funny...just one of the coolest f*cking books Ive ever read.You can get it real cheap on places like amazon.

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/71G2KFP613L._AA240_.gif

K-Dogg we need to talk about this book. i don;t want to turn this thread into a book club :o but i am over half way through it and i just don;t get it. maybe it is too politically entrenched? so many people LOVED this book, so i am thinking that maybe it is just me and my faltering brain? they say when you are pregnant you lose a few IQ points temporarily. lol!

I very recently read Wicked,finally, and for all its hype it was good not great.Maybe some stuff went over my head because I was expecting something alot more referential or complex after reading some of the reviews.

TomRiddle
06-14-2007, 05:26 AM
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51T8KP7H0RL._SS500_.jpg

incredible read.

TomRiddle
06-14-2007, 05:30 AM
http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SKD8RQ0DL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_.jpg http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ED20GX5WL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_.jpg


if you like Vietnam War Novels, then these books were one of the best I ever read, great book, it feels like youre in the jungles too.

OptimusWolf
06-14-2007, 05:42 AM
My fave books are

Grapes of Wrath - probably the best novel ever IMO
1984 - would be the best novel if the last third wasn't written in the grips of TB
Catcher in the Rye
Henry james stuff esp Washington square and Daisy Miller
Jane Eyre - old oldie but a goodie.

Personally I have a preference for the 20th century American novel, esp FS Fitzgerald and steinbeck

..........
06-14-2007, 06:52 AM
I just finished Jarhead, and American Psycho, and they were both excellent. I would recommend them both.

Malchius
06-14-2007, 05:29 PM
Of mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Really good short book, around 100 pages. Got some believable characters and a very good plot well worth it.

The Curious Incident of the Dog at Night time. Very interesting book about a boy with asbergers syndrome which is similar to autism but a bit different.

porlie
06-20-2007, 06:34 PM
Shot In The Heart by Mikal Gilmore. Awesome book by Gary Gilmores brother about the whole families life history and how Gary ended up where he did.

porlie
06-25-2007, 11:53 AM
Mafia Dynasty: The Rise and Fall of the Gambino Crime Family - John H. Davis

Jimmy The Gent
07-05-2007, 09:38 AM
The Hobbit and The lord of the rings trilogy are the best books I've ever read imo, but with the three films being released in kinda ruins the effec of the book If you haven't already read it. Same goes with the Pianist a good book but again released as a film ( and a fantastic film top 10 of all time imo). If you are still into reading you should try all quiet on the western front by Erich Maria Remarque, its good in that it tells the story of WWI from a group of German soldiers viewpoint. Another book i loved was "the miracle of Castel di sangro". If you are into crime novels then Look for the author james Patterson My dad seems to like his books

* FeistyWench *
07-05-2007, 11:05 AM
The Hobbit and The lord of the rings trilogy are the best books I've ever read imo, but with the three films being released in kinda ruins the effec of the book If you haven't already read it. Same goes with the Pianist a good book but again released as a film ( and a fantastic film top 10 of all time imo). If you are still into reading you should try all quiet on the western front by Erich Maria Remarque, its good in that it tells the story of WWI from a group of German soldiers viewpoint. Another book i loved was "the miracle of Castel di sangro". If you are into crime novels then Look for the author james Patterson My dad seems to like his books
james patterson was really good. i have read all of his books, his books are generally very easy to read. they grab your attention. however, in the last few years he has turned out some crap - too predictable or he tries to make a plot twist at the end that just doesn't work.

porlie
07-05-2007, 11:33 AM
I cant really get into reading fiction, I dont mind some fiction but true life stuff I just cant stop reading.

OptimusWolf
07-05-2007, 01:33 PM
Try Hi fidelity or Nick Hornby books in general for humorous writing about how us blokes think and act - scarily easy to identify with in my case.

Also try the james Bond novels, they're pretty good - much better thrillers than these patterson books (although some of his are better than others).

porlie
07-05-2007, 03:10 PM
Cheers for the recomends mate I'll look his stuff up, I read Head Hunters and The Football Factory theyre both non fiction books I enjoyed I suppose cos I could relate to the characters in them.

Moon
07-05-2007, 03:34 PM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)

You can never go wrong with Steinbeck .....

Grapes of Wrath (epic classic)
Of Mice and Men (shorter classic)
The Pearl (very short classic)

Or try Oscar Wilde's "A picture of Dorian Gray", if you want a trippy Victorian-era read

Moon
07-05-2007, 03:37 PM
Well Voltaire was a French philosopher and author. He was one of the great Enlightenment period thinkers. So the book Candide is a social commentary but because it is satirical it reads like a comedy. It's both entertaining and thought provoking.
If you like that read, you might want to try "Voltaire's Bastards" by Mike Ignatieff.

Moon
07-05-2007, 03:52 PM
Or, try any of these easy to find classics .......

A Clockwork Orange
Lord of the Flies
Anthem
To Kill a Mockingbird
Siddharta
Trinity
Looking for Mr Goodbar
The Good Earth

DR. FREECLOUD
07-06-2007, 11:18 AM
skinny legs and all by tom robbins
feed by M.T. Anderson

those two are pretty good books.

Gareth Ivanovic
07-06-2007, 02:18 PM
God is not Great "How Religion Poisons Everything" By Christopher Hithchens

A good book if you interested in that type of stuff.

Oasis_Lad
07-19-2007, 10:47 PM
Sam Bourne - The Righteous Men

I've almost finished reading this Hoff, and it's been a cunting good read so far.

Southpaw Stinger
07-19-2007, 10:59 PM
This was back when the Hoff was in his sexy Grimey days.

Oasis_Lad
07-19-2007, 11:03 PM
This was back when the Hoff was in his sexy Grimey days.

It seems like a life time ago, Doesn't it?

TheHoff!
07-20-2007, 04:56 PM
Sam Bourne - The Righteous Men

I've almost finished reading this Hoff, and it's been a cunting good read so far.

Cheers darling. I'll buy it when I get paid on the 25th.

K-Nan
07-20-2007, 05:03 PM
If you like Philosophy, you should really try the book in my avatar. It mixes a story with the author's outlook on life.His motorcycle is a constant theme in the book. He even realte's the theories of Hume and Kant to his Motorcycle.

* FeistyWench *
08-10-2007, 01:19 PM
..........bump.............

SAN D13GO VILLAN
08-14-2007, 05:48 PM
When the wind blows and The lake house by James Patterson These books are good if you like Fiction but you have to start with "When the wind blows" first. I'm glad I found this thread because i'm going to need something to read soon.

* FeistyWench *
08-14-2007, 06:41 PM
When the wind blows and The lake house by James Patterson These books are good if you like Fiction but you have to start with "When the wind blows" first. I'm glad I found this thread because i'm going to need something to read soon.

i loved those books too. :cool:

RAESAAD
08-14-2007, 06:42 PM
I'm currently reading "The Present" By Dr. Spencer Johnson......pretty good stuff.

BoxingPromoter
08-14-2007, 06:56 PM
Hoff! you got to check out one of personal favs "Into Thin Air" by Jon Krakauer. It's a first hand account of 'The Mt. Everest Disaster' that happened in 1996 and took the lives of, I think, 6 climbers. It's a story of survival, adventure, and human tragedy and will capivate any reader....

SonnyG8R
08-14-2007, 10:34 PM
World Without End By: Ken Follett

Due out in early October.

If this book is even half as good as Pillars of the Earth it will be great...

http://www.ken-follett.com/home/index.html

SAN D13GO VILLAN
08-15-2007, 04:26 PM
i loved those books too. :cool:

Recomend me a book thats similar to these, It has to be a book that catches my attention from begining to end.

* FeistyWench *
08-15-2007, 04:38 PM
Recomend me a book thats similar to these, It has to be a book that catches my attention from begining to end.
j. patterson actually has written some shorter books (series) about the kids with wings. they have the same names and all, but it's not the same story line.
They are called the Maximum Ride series.

???
08-15-2007, 04:39 PM
Does it have to be a real book or can it be a magna book?

* FeistyWench *
08-15-2007, 04:41 PM
Does it have to be a real book or can it be a magna book?
a magna book?

???
08-15-2007, 04:45 PM
a magna book?
You know...the Japanese cartoon books. Like Dragonball Z, Initial D etc.

* FeistyWench *
08-15-2007, 04:50 PM
You know...the Japanese cartoon books. Like Dragonball Z, Initial D etc.

ah, those might be best recommended in the comic thread. i can bump it.

SAN D13GO VILLAN
08-16-2007, 04:33 PM
j. patterson actually has written some shorter books (series) about the kids with wings. they have the same names and all, but it's not the same story line.
They are called the Maximum Ride series.

Thats the name of the main girl in the book. Any other good fiction books? Doesnt have to be from J. Patterson

eazy_mas
08-16-2007, 07:29 PM
" The Most Dangerous Game" by Richard Connell

nice short story inspired many movie including it was made into a movie

* FeistyWench *
08-17-2007, 09:51 AM
Thats the name of the main girl in the book. Any other good fiction books? Doesnt have to be from J. Patterson

yeah, it's the same kids, from the same place as in the When the Wind Blows but everything else if different.
I've never read anything else like that - kinda scifi, ya know?


i did like Dan Brown's The DaVinci Code and
Angels & Demons

porlie
08-17-2007, 11:27 AM
Five Families: The Rise, Decline, and Resurgence of America's Most Powerful Mafia Empires by Selwyn Raab

Read this and see how much of a stranglehold on US economics the Mob still have.

Trousersnake
08-17-2007, 11:40 AM
The Bible....

eazy_mas
08-17-2007, 02:34 PM
yeah, it's the same kids, from the same place as in the When the Wind Blows but everything else if different.
I've never read anything else like that - kinda scifi, ya know?


i did like Dan Brown's The DaVinci Code and
Angels & Demons

did you reaEdgar Allen Poe short stories?

There is one where a person trying to seek reveange I wonder why that idea havent made into a movie

* FeistyWench *
08-20-2007, 10:24 AM
did you reaEdgar Allen Poe short stories?

There is one where a person trying to seek reveange I wonder why that idea havent made into a movie

i read Poe when i was in school.

RockyMarcianofan00
08-29-2007, 10:46 AM
My suggestion would be 1984 by George Orwell, at times it can be alittle dry and its not the book for everyone. However if your like me and don't mind that its a really good story.......

Its just looking back there really wasn't that much dialogue. The books about 300 pages and I think collectively there's maybe a two pages of dialogue. Alot of things aren't said but the main character thinks them.

SonnyG8R
09-23-2007, 01:15 AM
I just finished a book called ONE BULLETT AWAY: THE MAKING OF A MARINE OFFICER by Nathaniel Fick.

Outstanding book!

http://www.nathanielfick.com/book/book.asp

LOLORSKATES
09-23-2007, 06:39 AM
Don't know much about history, everything you need to know about american history but never learned.

That's actually one title and it's pretty good book if you'd like to touch up on your Social Studies..

Oasis_Lad
10-03-2007, 07:34 AM
Hoffy, darling, recommend me a book.

Scottie2Hottie
10-03-2007, 03:38 PM
the last three books i read were angela's ashes, the catcher in the rye, and crime and punishment. stick to the classics.

SonnyG8R
10-03-2007, 05:48 PM
I just finished a book called ONE BULLETT AWAY: THE MAKING OF A MARINE OFFICER by Nathaniel Fick.

Outstanding book!

http://www.nathanielfick.com/book/book.asp

Scott, you need to read this book...

a penis
10-03-2007, 09:00 PM
the last three books i read were angela's ashes, the catcher in the rye, and crime and punishment. stick to the classics.

angela's ashes was great, although I tend not to trust memoirs so much because I think they exaggerate..

I have to read either: Slaughterhouse Five, A Thousand Splendid Suns or The Five People You Meet In Heaven

any of them good? it's for school so I'll have to write a report.

Oasis_Lad
10-03-2007, 09:02 PM
The Complete History of Jack the Ripper: This is easily the best book ever written on the subject; recommended for those interested in the history of the period and the Whitechapel murders themselves.

Southpaw Stinger
10-03-2007, 09:43 PM
The Complete History of Jack the Ripper: This is easily the best book ever written on the subject; recommended for those interested in the history of the period and the Whitechapel murders themselves.


I shall get me a copy, darlin. After reading it have you got any ideas on who he really was? I hope it's nothing like an Agatha Christie novels where it was "the Butler that done it"

SonnyG8R
10-04-2007, 02:14 AM
angela's ashes was great, although I tend not to trust memoirs so much because I think they exaggerate..

I have to read either: Slaughterhouse Five, A Thousand Splendid Suns or The Five People You Meet In Heaven

any of them good? it's for school so I'll have to write a report.

Slaughterhouse Five is outstanding...

a penis
10-04-2007, 09:07 PM
Slaughterhouse Five is outstanding...

the five people you meet in heaven sounds really interesting but like you everyone I've asked who's read has only good things to say about Slaughterhouse Five so I'll probably go for that.

Oasis_Lad
10-04-2007, 09:14 PM
I shall get me a copy, darlin. After reading it have you got any ideas on who he really was? I hope it's nothing like an Agatha Christie novels where it was "the Butler that done it"

It was Matt all along, darling. The crafty bugger had managed to build his own time machine and went back to do them prossies in.

Southpaw Stinger
10-04-2007, 09:37 PM
It was Matt all along, darling. The crafty bugger had managed to build his own time machine and went back to do them prossies in.

Damn, what a twist! Christie, couldn't write it, it's beautiful!

Dirt E Gomez
10-05-2007, 05:41 PM
God is not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher Hitchens

Disclaimer: Don't read if you're religious or are unsure of your own faith, it might cause you to lose it.

kryo
10-14-2007, 02:43 AM
God is not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher Hitchens

Disclaimer: Don't read if you're religious or are unsure of your own faith, it might cause you to lose it.

I doubt it, most people who are crazy about their religion will just blow off facts, and the people who will read this and actually understand it and are religious will already know what's wrong with their religion.

Read The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster by Bobby Henderson if you want to read something about religions. Sounds retarded, but it's written by a ****ing brilliant man and makes hilarious points. Very satirical.

duphregne
10-24-2007, 10:27 AM
The Old man and the Sea

Classic Hemmingway

Tuggers1986
10-24-2007, 10:45 AM
Don't know if you've seen any of the Bourne films but the books by Robert Ludlam are amazing!

Randall_Hopkirk
11-03-2007, 10:17 PM
Any Americans read John Dos Passos' book "USA"? A terrific ode to early 20th century America that nostalgics will love.

Other good books are Saul Bellow's "Herzog" and Gunter Grass' "The Tin Drum".

macman
11-05-2007, 09:39 AM
If you liked Gorky Park, you'd probably like Dennis Lehane's "A Drink before the War", "Darkness Take My Hand", "Sacred", etc.
Lehane's probably best known for Mystic River, which Clint Eastwood made a film about. The guy can really write, as well as being entertaining.

Also Greg Rucka's series "Keeper", "Smoker", "Finder" about a professional bodyguard were pretty good.


Different genre (Sci-fi), but great books - well written with fast moving, interesting & relevant stories -
Peter Watts : Starfish, Maelstrom, Behemoth.
Alastair Reynolds : any of the Revelation Space series.
Neals Asher - pretty well anything.

SnoopySmurf
11-07-2007, 10:26 AM
Dunno if it's been mentioned yet, but buy the book called "I Am Legend". Great short story. About 130 pages.

Probably the best vampire novella ever written since Dracula.

guzi815
12-12-2007, 08:11 PM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)

cool beans! Ay Hoff, if you ever "TRIED" to understand women, or asked yourself how come women do certain things, or even if you just scratched your head at what makes a woman tick....

You just might find some answers, or at least a "better" understand about the inhabitants of Venus, by reading "NANCY FRIDAY's" (Author) "THE POWER OF BEAUTY" (Title). It is somewhat of an autobiography, and Nancy Friday reveals things in her book that just make things more clearer, like in one chapter....she reaveals that most women fantasize about being subdued by a total stranger...and be totally manhandled! (of course, I kept it clean, these are NOT the words she uses!) The book will surprise you.

Happy readings!

Oasis_Lad
12-13-2007, 12:09 AM
The Sherlock Holmes long stories are good reads:

A Study in Scarlet
The Sign of Four
The Hound of the Baskervilles
The valley of Fear

Also - The Salamandra Glass by A.W. Mykel is a very good spy thriller.

Southpaw Stinger
12-13-2007, 01:08 AM
"I got 99 problems but a ***** ain't one" is a good read.

col Blake
12-13-2007, 10:00 AM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)
terry prachett, ben elton or better still anything by tom sharpe, you will piss yourself laughing, great stories.

BoxingPromoter
12-13-2007, 10:10 AM
"Into the Wild" by John Kraukauer...

col Blake
12-13-2007, 10:22 AM
janet and john is a good place to start

BoxingPromoter
12-13-2007, 10:28 AM
Why you so red?

Sane Man
12-13-2007, 12:06 PM
Arry ****ing Potter

col Blake
12-13-2007, 05:37 PM
whitehouse, fiesta, great read if you don't come on the pages.

porlie
12-13-2007, 06:58 PM
Among The thugs - Bill Buford
An Americans book about his experiences with English football hooligans.

Dorian
12-13-2007, 07:53 PM
From Pieces To Weight -50 Cent
:P

GhostInMachines
12-14-2007, 07:24 PM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)

read anything by kurt voneget. Breakfast of champions was the best book ive ever read.

angelo_dundee
12-17-2007, 10:18 PM
New York Trilogy by Paul Auster. Masterpiece.

GhostInMachines
12-18-2007, 04:18 PM
lol i think the guys found a book by now

Oasis_Lad
01-19-2008, 07:53 PM
Anorak: My Life Among the ****s.

KLUGMAN
01-20-2008, 11:50 PM
Shot In The Heart by Mikal Gilmore. Awesome book by Gary Gilmores brother about the whole families life history and how Gary ended up where he did.

If you're gonna read that, gotta read Executioner's Song. Say what you will about Mailer, but this is the fastest 1000+ page book you'll read in your life. Total page turner and borderline genius.

BiggyGuns91
01-21-2008, 05:49 AM
the hobbit

moofo
01-21-2008, 07:21 AM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)
"A piece of Cake" By:
Cupcake Brown

AliKillsTyson
01-22-2008, 12:32 AM
Question:

Has anyone ever read a book that somebody else has recommended on this thread?

I actually read Wicked that somebody mentioned. That's about it.

SnoopySmurf
01-22-2008, 10:26 AM
World War Z

Bought the book 4 days ago. Couldn't put it down. I finished it yesterday. Brad Pitt's movie production is rumored to have bought the film rights to this book.

Oasis_Lad
02-23-2008, 06:26 PM
Question:

Has anyone ever read a book that somebody else has recommended on this thread?

I actually read Wicked that somebody mentioned. That's about it.

I started reading the Inspector Rebus novels after the Hoff recommended them, and i'm thankful he did as i can never put them down.

BoxingPromoter
02-23-2008, 10:16 PM
Robert Lewis Stevenson's "The Strange Case of Dr Jeckyll and Mr Hyde" is one of my favs...

K-DOGG
05-06-2008, 07:55 PM
Just read an old book that was my dad's. It's called "Home of the Gods". For anyone with questions about religion, our cultural history, how we all tie together and how long we've been on this planet....as well as similarities between ancient cultures who supposedly had no contact with one another......THIS IS A MUST READ!

Basically, it has to do with the ancient civilization of Atlantis which supposedly sunk into the ocean about 10,000 B.C. At least, that's the starting point......the more you read, the more some of life's little oddities and questions become clear. At least that was my take.

Copywrite was circa 1977, so I'm not even sure if it's still in print; but if you're into that kind of think....it's definetly worth looking for.

Bendigo
05-07-2008, 02:23 AM
Black Swan Green by David Mitchell. You won't be disappointed. :fing02:

Sweet Pea 50
05-07-2008, 04:07 AM
Last book I read was Blaze..:sad2:

http://www.downinthecellar.com/images/blaze.jpg

I'm reading this right now

http://www.barryozeroff.com/book008.jpg

Yeah, I like popcorn novels.

Dye
05-08-2008, 02:49 AM
I only Read Books When I was in Detention or ISS.

When I was in Supsension Altertenative School I read a 700 Page Science Book in 6 hours.

The Victim
05-13-2008, 01:03 PM
Night by Eli Wiesel

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

Winterdance by Gary Paulsen

all three i couldnt put down for one second

The Victim
05-13-2008, 01:12 PM
The Old man and the Sea

Classic Hemmingway

yea i agree with this...forgot about this book.

Flab
05-13-2008, 01:16 PM
I've heard good things about the new addition of 40+ wives.

Dirt E Gomez
05-13-2008, 03:11 PM
I just finished rereading one of my favorite books, Brave New World.... I'm not sure if it's required reading in High school/College classes, but it should be.

Mech.
05-13-2008, 03:22 PM
I just finished rereading one of my favorite books, Brave New World.... I'm not sure if it's required reading in High school/College classes, but it should be.

The strokes song is better.

Dirt E Gomez
05-13-2008, 03:54 PM
The strokes song is better.

Your taste in music is spot on today, with comments about both The Strokes and The White Stripes.

Well done, sir.

The Noose
05-14-2008, 07:57 AM
Just read an old book that was my dad's. It's called "Home of the Gods". For anyone with questions about religion, our cultural history, how we all tie together and how long we've been on this planet....as well as similarities between ancient cultures who supposedly had no contact with one another......THIS IS A MUST READ!

Basically, it has to do with the ancient civilization of Atlantis which supposedly sunk into the ocean about 10,000 B.C. At least, that's the starting point......the more you read, the more some of life's little oddities and questions become clear. At least that was my take.

Copywrite was circa 1977, so I'm not even sure if it's still in print; but if you're into that kind of think....it's definetly worth looking for.

sounds interesting. I highly recommend Straw Dogs;thoughts on humans and other animals.
It dicusses the myth that humans are seperate from other animals and discusses how humanism and christianity are similar in their elavating the human above other species.
Very easy to read and very well written even if u disagree.

Shambleton
05-27-2008, 04:33 PM
The Old man and the Sea

Classic Hemmingway

I especially like Hemmingway's short stories. 'Men without women' is one of my favourite collections. Also J.D. Salinger is a good short story writer and Chekhov is ****in' ace....

I just read 'The God delusion' by Richard Dawkins, great book if you're into religion or if you are an intelligent Christian and want to test your faith.

Nicky_Hatton
05-27-2008, 09:26 PM
I especially like Hemmingway's short stories. 'Men without women' is one of my favourite collections. Also J.D. Salinger is a good short story writer and Chekhov is ****in' ace....

I just read 'The God delusion' by Richard Dawkins, great book if you're into religion or if you are an intelligent Christian and want to test your faith.

What the **** happened to the real Jamboboy?

He used to be cool. ****ing book worm.

TRAVI$
05-28-2008, 11:49 AM
Bible's pretty good
If you cut out all the religious ****

BETTY SWOLLOCKS
06-15-2008, 10:46 AM
Skin Gods, Rosary Girls by Richard Montanari- Good murder thrillers, based in Philadelphia, pretty gruesome, but keeps you guessin. I hate books when you can guess the endings, but i never saw the conclusions coming in his books!

Plato- The republic. It can be a lot to take in at first, but once you realise this is the basis for western civilisation. Society around you starts to make a bit more sense and they say knowledge is power!

The Interpretation of murder by Jed Rubenfeld: Fictionalised account of a real event when the founding fathers of psychology (Freud,Jung,Bryll etc) all met in New York in the early 1900's. A lot of suspense and is also like a little crashcourse in psychology and how the human mind works. Very interesting!!

Hagler★
06-19-2008, 06:43 PM
gangster
by lorenzo carcaterra

Shambleton
06-23-2008, 06:36 PM
What the **** happened to the real Jamboboy?

He used to be cool. ****ing book worm.

Nicky you should read, it's good fun.

I am currently reading three men in a boat by Jerome k Jerome, its good.
Very funny.
Just finished 'No country for old men' by Cormac McCarthy, it was ok. Dirt E. Gomez recommended it to me but i'm not really into that kind of stuff. Probably good if you like thrillers.

TheHoff'sGhost
06-23-2008, 07:25 PM
I read the old man and the sea a week or so ago. ****ing loved it.

I'm reading For whom the bell tolls at the moment, and liking it. That Hemingway fella was a half decent story teller you know.

The interpretation of murder was a good yarn. A page turner for sure, and it'll make a good film so it will.

TheHoff'sGhost
06-23-2008, 07:27 PM
I especially like Hemmingway's short stories. 'Men without women' is one of my favourite collections. Also J.D. Salinger is a good short story writer and Chekhov is ****in' ace....

I just read 'The God delusion' by Richard Dawkins, great book if you're into religion or if you are an intelligent Christian and want to test your faith.

I've read everything by JD Salinger. I wish that reclusive cunt would have wrote a few more books though. The cunt.

Shambleton
06-23-2008, 07:31 PM
I've read everything by JD Salinger. I wish that reclusive cunt would have wrote a few more books though. The cunt.

We should go round his gaff and force the lazy cunt to write some more.
What's your favourite Salinger story hoff?

abadger
06-23-2008, 07:32 PM
I recommend 'The World According To Garp' by John Irving. It is absolutely brilliant.

Also good by him are 'The Cider House Rules' and 'A Prayer For Owen Meany'

both excellent, Garp is the best.

TheHoff'sGhost
06-23-2008, 07:40 PM
We should go round his gaff and force the lazy cunt to write some more.
What's your favourite Salinger story hoff?

Weren't there rumours that he wrote under an assumed name? Thomas Pynchon was the one that I heard.

Franny and Zooey probably.

abadger
06-23-2008, 07:45 PM
Weren't there rumours that he wrote under an assumed name? Thomas Pynchon was the one that I heard.

Franny and Zooey probably.

Franny and Zooey is my favourite too, but I only have Catcher In The Rye to compare it too. I haven't read anything else by him.

Shambleton
06-23-2008, 07:48 PM
Franny and Zooey is my favourite too, but I only have Catcher In The Rye to compare it too. I haven't read anything else by him.

Franny and Zooey is very good, I like all of the Glass family stories, he really makes them real. I also real like to esme with love and squalor and the last one in nine stories but i can't remember the name.

abadger
06-23-2008, 08:04 PM
Franny and Zooey is very good, I like all of the Glass family stories, he really makes them real. I also real like to esme with love and squalor and the last one in nine stories but i can't remember the name.

Well, I'm sure I'll get round to reading them all one day. At the moment I'm mostly reading the weirdness that is JG Ballard. The Drowned World, The Drought and The Crystal World are all I've read so far, and I think the best way to describe them is like Graham Greene if he had been on drugs. They all take the world, change something about it (drought, flood, crystallizing(!)) and then just plonk you down with a character there and its never really clear what it all means. Like Graham Greene, its all mostly about the inner lives of the characters, but they are often so passive and blank you wonder what he's trying to say. Very hard to describe, but definitely worth a look.

TheHoff'sGhost
06-23-2008, 08:13 PM
I've read cocaine nights and the empire of the sun by ballard, and a couple of other books by him, but I forget what their titles are. Cocaine nights and empire of the sun I enjoyed a lot, though the others two were sci fi and didn't really grab me as much.

Shambleton
06-23-2008, 08:16 PM
I've read cocaine nights and the empire of the sun by ballard, and a couple of other books by him, but I forget what their titles are. Cocaine nights and empire of the sun I enjoyed a lot, though the others two were sci fi and didn't really grab me as much.

The empire of the sun, weren't that a film?

Might have to check these out, cheers cunts.

TheHoff'sGhost
06-23-2008, 08:23 PM
The empire of the sun, weren't that a film?

Might have to check these out, cheers cunts.

Yeah, by Spielberg I think, but it was ****. The film, as in most cases when they make an adaptation of a novel, was a complete cunting let down. The book is much much better.

the_godslayer
06-25-2008, 08:28 AM
if you like the fantasy genre then try the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan, im on book 3 of 10 and its an excellent read

BoxingPromoter
08-21-2008, 07:08 PM
I just got done reading "The Monster of Florence" by Doug Preston and Mario Spezi. It's the true story of the unsolved crime of Italy's famous serial killer "the monster of Florence" and details the bizarre investigation of the crimes....

Duggie
09-12-2008, 05:07 AM
John Grisham - The innocent man - his first crack at non-fiction. A good read showing just how corrupt the justice system can be

Tuggers1986
09-12-2008, 08:21 AM
The Invisible Villain - Ian Mcmillan

http://www.uktouring.org.uk/ian-mcmillan/images-a/invisible-villain-33%25.jpg

Tuggers1986
09-12-2008, 08:22 AM
Seriously though....

Remote Control by Andy Mcnab is a brilliant book.

abadger
09-12-2008, 08:22 AM
John Grisham - The innocent man - his first crack at non-fiction. A good read showing just how corrupt the justice system can be

That was pretty good for grisham, though a slavish imitation of Truman Capote's In Cold Blood.

Iamnotausername
09-12-2008, 09:11 AM
Any of you guys read the Jigsaw man. Its by Paul Britton who used psychological profiling to try and build a picture of potential suspects in criminal investigations, he worked on the Rachel Nickell murder. Its very interesting IMO in terms of profiling.

Duggie
09-12-2008, 09:37 AM
Any of you guys read the Jigsaw man. Its by Paul Britton who used psychological profiling to try and build a picture of potential suspects in criminal investigations, he worked on the Rachel Nickell murder. Its very interesting IMO in terms of profiling.

my mum bought it but then gave it to her friend the silly cunt

Iamnotausername
09-12-2008, 10:53 AM
my mum bought it but then gave it to her friend the silly cunt

I'll refrain from agreeing that your mums a silly cunt cos I'm sure she's lovely, but it was a bad move by her!

The Wire
09-12-2008, 03:05 PM
The Road by Cormac McCarthy. It's the bollocks.

Clegg
09-12-2008, 03:22 PM
Any of you guys read the Jigsaw man. Its by Paul Britton who used psychological profiling to try and build a picture of potential suspects in criminal investigations, he worked on the Rachel Nickell murder. Its very interesting IMO in terms of profiling.

I picked it up in a charity shop a couple of years ago for 50p, but still haven't read it.

Iamnotausername
09-14-2008, 11:21 AM
I picked it up in a charity shop a couple of years ago for 50p, but still haven't read it.

Bargain! Its well worth reading. Its like 'Interpretation of murder' in the sense that its a crash course in basic psychology aswell as a good read.

Clegg
09-16-2008, 07:24 PM
I remember when Interpretation Of Murder came out, I decided to give it a miss as I prefer my own interpretation of Freud: a sex mad cokehead furiously wanking over his own mum, while cancer rots his jaw away.

Have you read any John Douglas books? That's a similar thing to Jigsaw Man, only an American guy in the FBI. I read one which was quite decent, although I've forgotten almost all of it now. It's weird how some books stick in your head, and others don't, even if they're of comparative quality.

phallus
09-17-2008, 02:49 AM
i just read Tortilla Flat by Steinbeck. great book, it's a bunch of short stories about a group of alcoholic mixed race bums. i loved it, there's this one story that especially good about a little pink pig and Sweets Ramirez steps on its tail

alza1988
09-17-2008, 09:27 AM
The damage done. Twelve years of hell in a Bangkok prison
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Damage-Done-Twelve-Bangkok-Prison/dp/184018275X

Murray
09-17-2008, 06:05 PM
Dog Man: An Uncommon Life on a Faraway Mountain

Interesting read.

Sweet Pea 50
09-18-2008, 10:05 PM
http://www.textbooksrus.com/book_pics_large/0595409709.jpg

Reading this right now. It's about the development of the 03 SVT Mustang Cobra. Pretty good throne material.

Naps
10-01-2008, 06:37 AM
The damage done. Twelve years of hell in a Bangkok prison
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Damage-Done-Twelve-Bangkok-Prison/dp/184018275X

Very good book.

But the best book I have ever read is called Papillon. It's about a guy who gets sent to a prison colony in French Guyana, and how he escapes, gets caught, escapes again several times. He visits many different jails throughout the book, from which he escapes or attempts to escape at each one.

It's a true story, and the man it's about Henri Charriere is about the most impressive bloke I've ever heard of, even if he is a frog.

Oasis_Lad
10-07-2008, 07:29 AM
I remember when Interpretation Of Murder came out, I decided to give it a miss as I prefer my own interpretation of Freud: a sex mad cokehead furiously wanking over his own mum, while cancer rots his jaw away.

Have you read any John Douglas books? That's a similar thing to Jigsaw Man, only an American guy in the FBI. I read one which was quite decent, although I've forgotten almost all of it now. It's weird how some books stick in your head, and others don't, even if they're of comparative quality.

You should definitely read Interpretation Of Murder as It's a cracking read.

The book I'm reading now is of a similar vein, just replace Freud and Jung with Oscar Wilde and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It's called: Oscar Wilde and the Candlelight Murders and is an engrossing yarn.

Get them down yer.

Clegg
10-07-2008, 07:32 AM
I'm currently reading The Jigsaw Man and Watchmen, but I'll keep an eye out for the ones you mention in the meantime.

beecherhq
10-08-2008, 07:53 PM
Just finished reading watchmen the other week and it's absolutely brilliant would highly recommend it. I would also recommend stephen fry's autobiography and any of his novels. Also if your into rock music etc. read Henry rollins 'get in the van' his diaries over the years touring with black flag.

Iamnotausername
10-09-2008, 03:48 AM
Also If you're a rock fan (it may have been mentioned before), reading 'The Dirt' Motley Crue's autobiography is a must!

beecherhq
10-09-2008, 06:04 AM
Also If you're a rock fan (it may have been mentioned before), reading 'The Dirt' Motley Crue's autobiography is a must!

Borrowed it a couple of years back and its quality, definitely a must as you say. Don't think theres anything left out of that book bar the stuff thats been eroded from their brains through drug abuse.

Tha_Greatest
10-09-2008, 06:10 AM
I havent got anything to read at the moment so if you could could recommend me a good book I'd be grateful. I'm not fussed as to what genre or whatever, just as long as its well written and a good story.

Recommend away...thankyou :)
you should read any book where you see pamela anderson on the cover

Alexis Vastine
10-09-2008, 08:41 AM
Jamie Carraghers autobiography is sick. he is up there with malcom x.

CARRAGHER: WE HAVE ENOUGH COVER
Joe Curran 09 October 2008
Jamie Carragher believes Liverpool can cope in the absence of his central defensive partner Martin Skrtel.
The 23-year-old Slovakian international damaged posterior ligaments in his right knee during Liverpool's 3-2 win over Manchester City on Sunday and will not return to action until December.

But Carragher insists that although it's a disappointment to lose Skrtel, the presence of Daniel Agger and Sami Hyypia in the squad means that the Reds have more than enough cover in the back line.

"It's a massive blow ***8211; Martin has been a great player for us since he arrived at the club," Carragher told Liverpoolfc.tv.

"We didn't know much about him when he first came to the club, but he's done very well. He has cemented himself in the Liverpool team quite quickly - which is a very tough thing to do.

"It's just unfortunate for him that it's such a bad injury but obviously it gives someone else a chance to get a run in the team.

"That's why you need a big squad in a long season and credit to the manager as well, he's seen that we didn't have enough players in that area of the pitch at times last season and we have Hyypia and Agger who can come in now."

And Carragher admitted he feared the worst when he saw Skrtel go to ground on Sunday, but tipped the tough-tackling centre-back to make a quick recovery.

"We saw Martin on the pitch and realised it wasn't good, and you don't really know about these injuries until a day or two afterwards with all the scans.

"He walked onto the coach after the game so we thought it wasn't too bad then, but it's still not nice to look at when you see it on the TV.

"He doesn't need an operation and it's not as bad as we feared - so hopefully he'll be back for the games at Christmas."

alza1988
10-11-2008, 01:42 PM
Very good book.

But the best book I have ever read is called Papillon. It's about a guy who gets sent to a prison colony in French Guyana, and how he escapes, gets caught, escapes again several times. He visits many different jails throughout the book, from which he escapes or attempts to escape at each one.

It's a true story, and the man it's about Henri Charriere is about the most impressive bloke I've ever heard of, even if he is a frog.

This is a good video .It's the FFL in French Guayana ,it mentions something about papillion and a jail .The convicts that tried to escape got fed to the sharks
1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Og6PYGhd7Q0
2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5GNbLsjXWBM&feature=related
3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTSpJ-xbWRM&feature=related
4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbtJxoO5n0c&feature=related
5 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SV15h_eGJCw&feature=related

LOLORSKATES
10-11-2008, 07:41 PM
Romance of The Three Kingdoms.

Eat ****.

`STEELHEAD
01-05-2009, 06:11 AM
cormac mccarthys"blood meridian" is the most disturbing book i've read in years.very heavy. easy read.one of the best!

the book "american psycho" by ellis .
the movie is sht in comparison.

Charles Darwin
01-17-2009, 07:15 PM
cormac mccarthys"blood meridian" is the most disturbing book i've read in years.very heavy. easy read.one of the best!

the book "american psycho" by ellis .
the movie is sht in comparison.

I read 'No country for old men.' By Cormac McCarthy. It was crap if I'm honest.

Oasis_Lad
01-17-2009, 07:16 PM
Brit literature is where it's at.

AztecWanker
01-17-2009, 08:42 PM
cormac mccarthys"blood meridian" is the most disturbing book i've read in years.very heavy. easy read.one of the best!

the book "american psycho" by ellis .
the movie is sht in comparison.

great choices. im reading blood meridian right now and you can picture the old west its fantastic. and i agree on american psycho, how they managed to make a movie on it i cant explain, still though, the movie is like a g-rated barney episode compared to the novel.

fight_professor
03-20-2009, 05:57 PM
In the Line of Fire, a Memoir. Pervez Musharrf, fmr President of Pakistan.

Very interesting.

beecherhq
03-23-2009, 05:58 PM
Just read Homicide by David Simon the creator of the television show the wire. It's bloody real.

Pharoahe
04-03-2009, 07:44 PM
"Bel Canto" by Ann Patchett is a very good one.

"Dubliners" by James Joyce is classic.

aristotlemoses
04-13-2009, 05:05 PM
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy

aristotlemoses
04-13-2009, 05:06 PM
actually i love all of mccarthy's books ive read so far

blood meridian
no country for old men
the road
child of god
suttree
all the pretty horses

sweetbayag
05-20-2009, 02:15 AM
the last samurai using chopstick

MilesP
06-27-2009, 07:01 AM
Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami

Shambleton
08-03-2009, 05:13 PM
actually i love all of mccarthy's books ive read so far

blood meridian
no country for old men
the road
child of god
suttree
all the pretty horses

The only one of his i've read. I didn't really like it much.

Caesar
08-14-2009, 07:56 AM
i like paulo coelho books

Walt Liquor
08-14-2009, 10:33 AM
Education of a Felon by Edward Bunker, the og of convict authors in modern America.

Gojira
08-14-2009, 10:59 AM
The Hobbit- j.r.r tolkien

thurrmac
08-27-2009, 12:45 AM
The Bible... read it over and over again...

Virgil Caine
08-28-2009, 01:37 AM
George Orwell.

1984
Burmese Days
Animal Farm

I'd also include George Orwell, "Politics and the English Language," 1946 (http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/orwell46.htm)
Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it. Our civilization is decadent and our language -- so the argument runs -- must inevitably share in the general collapse. It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or hansom cabs to aeroplanes. Underneath this lies the half-conscious belief that language is a natural growth and not an instrument which we shape for our own purposes.
Now, it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and economic causes: it is not due simply to the bad influence of this or that individual writer. But an effect can become a cause, reinforcing the original cause and producing the same effect in an intensified form, and so on indefinitely. A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that is happening to the English language. It becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts. The point is that the process is reversible. Modern English, especially written English, is full of bad habits which spread by imitation and which can be avoided if one is willing to take the necessary trouble. If one gets rid of these habits one can think more clearly, and to think clearly is a necessary first step toward political regeneration: so that the fight against bad English is not frivolous and is not the exclusive concern of professional writers. I will come back to this presently, and I hope that by that time the meaning of what I have said here will have become clearer. Meanwhile, here are five specimens of the English language as it is now habitually written.
These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad -- I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen -- but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that i can refer back to them when necessary:
1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.
Professor Harold Laski (Essay in Freedom of Expression)
2. Above all, we cannot play ducks and drakes with a native battery of idioms which prescribes egregious collocations of vocables as the Basic put up with for tolerate, or put at a loss for bewilder .
Professor Lancelot Hogben (Interglossa)
3. On the one side we have the free personality: by definition it is not neurotic, for it has neither conflict nor dream. Its desires, such as they are, are transparent, for they are just what institutional approval keeps in the forefront of consciousness; another institutional pattern would alter their number and intensity; there is little in them that is natural, irreducible, or culturally dangerous. But on the other side, the social bond itself is nothing but the mutual reflection of these self-secure integrities. Recall the definition of love. Is not this the very picture of a small academic? Where is there a place in this hall of mirrors for either personality or fraternity?
Essay on psychology in Politics (New York)
4. All the "best people" from the gentlemen's clubs, and all the frantic fascist captains, united in common hatred of Socialism and bestial horror at the rising tide of the mass revolutionary movement, have turned to acts of provocation, to foul incendiarism, to medieval legends of poisoned wells, to legalize their own destruction of proletarian organizations, and rouse the agitated petty-bourgeoise to chauvinistic fervor on behalf of the fight against the revolutionary way out of the crisis.
Communist pamphlet
5. If a new spirit is to be infused into this old country, there is one thorny and contentious reform which must be tackled, and that is the humanization and galvanization of the B.B.C. Timidity here will bespeak canker and atrophy of the soul. The heart of Britain may be sound and of strong beat, for instance, but the British lion's roar at present is like that of Bottom in Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream -- as gentle as any sucking dove. A virile new Britain cannot continue indefinitely to be traduced in the eyes or rather ears, of the world by the effete languors of Langham Place, brazenly masquerading as "standard English." When the Voice of Britain is heard at nine o'clock, better far and infinitely less ludicrous to hear aitches honestly dropped than the present priggish, inflated, inhibited, school-ma'amish arch braying of blameless bashful mewing maidens!
Letter in Tribune
Each of these passages has faults of its own, but, quite apart from avoidable ugliness, two qualities are common to all of them. The first is staleness of imagery; the other is lack of precision. The writer either has a meaning and cannot express it, or he inadvertently says something else, or he is almost indifferent as to whether his words mean anything or not. This mixture of vagueness and sheer incompetence is the most marked characteristic of modern English prose, and especially of any kind of political writing. As soon as certain topics are raised, the concrete melts into the abstract and no one seems able to think of turns of speech that are not hackneyed: prose consists less and less of words chosen for the sake of their meaning, and more and more of phrases tacked together like the sections of a prefabricated henhouse. I list below, with notes and examples, various of the tricks by means of which the work of prose construction is habitually dodged:
Dying metaphors. A newly invented metaphor assists thought by evoking a visual image, while on the other hand a metaphor which is technically "dead" (e.g. iron resolution) has in effect reverted to being an ordinary word and can generally be used without loss of vividness. But in between these two classes there is a huge dump of worn-out metaphors which have lost all evocative power and are merely used because they save people the trouble of inventing phrases for themselves. Examples are: Ring the changes on, take up the cudgel for, toe the line, ride roughshod over, stand shoulder to shoulder with, play into the hands of, no axe to grind, grist to the mill, fishing in troubled waters, on the order of the day, Achilles' heel, swan song, hotbed. Many of these are used without knowledge of their meaning (what is a "rift," for instance?), and incompatible metaphors are frequently mixed, a sure sign that the writer is not interested in what he is saying. Some metaphors now current have been twisted out of their original meaning withouth those who use them even being aware of the fact. For example, toe the line is sometimes written as tow the line. Another example is the hammer and the anvil, now always used with the implication that the anvil gets the worst of it. In real life it is always the anvil that breaks the hammer, never the other way about: a writer who stopped to think what he was saying would avoid perverting the original phrase.

Virgil Caine
08-28-2009, 01:44 AM
Operators or verbal false limbs. These save the trouble of picking out appropriate verbs and nouns, and at the same time pad each sentence with extra syllables which give it an appearance of symmetry. Characteristic phrases are render inoperative, militate against, make contact with, be subjected to, give rise to, give grounds for, have the effect of, play a leading part (role) in, make itself felt, take effect, exhibit a tendency to, serve the purpose of, etc., etc. The keynote is the elimination of simple verbs. Instead of being a single word, such as break, stop, spoil, mend, kill, a verb becomes a phrase, made up of a noun or adjective tacked on to some general-purpose verb such as prove, serve, form, play, render. In addition, the passive voice is wherever possible used in preference to the active, and noun constructions are used instead of gerunds (by examination of instead of by examining). The range of verbs is further cut down by means of the -ize and de- formations, and the banal statements are given an appearance of profundity by means of the not un- formation. Simple conjunctions and prepositions are replaced by such phrases as with respect to, having regard to, the fact that, by dint of, in view of, in the interests of, on the hypothesis that; and the ends of sentences are saved by anticlimax by such resounding commonplaces as greatly to be desired, cannot be left out of account, a development to be expected in the near future, deserving of serious consideration, brought to a satisfactory conclusion, and so on and so forth.
Pretentious diction. Words like phenomenon, element, individual (as noun), objective, categorical, effective, virtual, basic, primary, promote, constitute, exhibit, exploit, utilize, eliminate, liquidate, are used to dress up a simple statement and give an air of scientific impartiality to biased judgements. Adjectives like epoch-making, epic, historic, unforgettable, triumphant, age-old, inevitable, inexorable, veritable, are used to dignify the sordid process of international politics, while writing that aims at glorifying war usually takes on an archaic color, its characteristic words being: realm, throne, chariot, mailed fist, trident, sword, shield, buckler, banner, jackboot, clarion. Foreign words and expressions such as cul de sac, ancien regime, deus ex machina, mutatis mutandis, status quo, gleichschaltung, weltanschauung, are used to give an air of culture and elegance. Except for the useful abbreviations i.e., e.g., and etc., there is no real need for any of the hundreds of foreign phrases now current in the English language. Bad writers, and especially scientific, political, and sociological writers, are nearly always haunted by the notion that Latin or Greek words are grander than Saxon ones, and unnecessary words like expedite, ameliorate, predict, extraneous, deracinated, clandestine, subaqueous, and hundreds of others constantly gain ground from their Anglo-Saxon numbers.* The jargon peculiar to
________________________________________
*An interesting illustration of this is the way in which English flower names were in use till very recently are being ousted by Greek ones, Snapdragon becoming antirrhinum, forget-me-not becoming myosotis, etc. It is hard to see any practical reason for this change of fashion: it is probably due to an instinctive turning away from the more homely word and a vague feeling that the Greek word is scientific.
________________________________________
Marxist writing (hyena, hangman, cannibal, petty bourgeois, these gentry, lackey, flunkey, mad dog, White Guard, etc.) consists largely of words translated from Russian, German, or French; but the normal way of coining a new word is to use Latin or Greek root with the appropriate affix and, where necessary, the size formation. It is often easier to make up words of this kind (deregionalize, impermissible, extramarital, non-fragmentary and so forth) than to think up the English words that will cover one's meaning. The result, in general, is an increase in slovenliness and vagueness.
Meaningless words. In certain kinds of writing, particularly in art criticism and literary criticism, it is normal to come across long passages which are almost completely lacking in meaning.***8224; Words like romantic, plastic, values, human, dead, sentimental, natural, vitality, as used in art criticism, are strictly meaningless, in
________________________________________
***8224; Example: Comfort's catholicity of perception and image, strangely Whitmanesque in range, almost the exact opposite in aesthetic compulsion, continues to evoke that trembling atmospheric accumulative hinting at a cruel, an inexorably serene timelessness . . .Wrey Gardiner scores by aiming at simple bull's-eyes with precision. Only they are not so simple, and through this contented sadness runs more than the surface bittersweet of resignation." (Poetry Quarterly)
________________________________________
the sense that they not only do not point to any discoverable object, but are hardly ever expected to do so by the reader. When one critic writes, "The outstanding feature of Mr. X's work is its living quality," while another writes, "The immediately striking thing about Mr. X's work is its peculiar deadness," the reader accepts this as a simple difference opinion. If words like black and white were involved, instead of the jargon words dead and living, he would see at once that language was being used in an improper way. Many political words are similarly abused. The word Fascism has now no meaning except in so far as it signifies "something not desirable." The words democracy, socialism, freedom, patriotic, realistic, justice have each of them several different meanings which cannot be reconciled with one another. In the case of a word like democracy, not only is there no agreed definition, but the attempt to make one is resisted from all sides. It is almost universally felt that when we call a country democratic we are praising it: consequently the defenders of every kind of regime claim that it is a democracy, and fear that they might have to stop using that word if it were tied down to any one meaning. Words of this kind are often used in a consciously dishonest way. That is, the person who uses them has his own private definition, but allows his hearer to think he means something quite different. Statements like Marshal Pétain was a true patriot, The Soviet press is the freest in the world, The Catholic Church is opposed to persecution, are almost always made with intent to deceive. Other words used in variable meanings, in most cases more or less dishonestly, are: class, totalitarian, science, progressive, reactionary, bourgeois, equality.
Now that I have made this catalogue of swindles and perversions, let me give another example of the kind of writing that they lead to. This time it must of its nature be an imaginary one. I am going to translate a passage of good English into modern English of the worst sort. Here is a well-known verse from Ecclesiastes:
I returned and saw under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all.

..........

Virgil Caine
08-28-2009, 01:48 AM
Here it is in modern English:
Objective considerations of contemporary phenomena compel the conclusion that success or failure in competitive activities exhibits no tendency to be commensurate with innate capacity, but that a considerable element of the unpredictable must invariably be taken into account.
This is a parody, but not a very gross one. Exhibit (3) above, for instance, contains several patches of the same kind of English. It will be seen that I have not made a full translation. The beginning and ending of the sentence follow the original meaning fairly closely, but in the middle the concrete illustrations -- race, battle, bread -- dissolve into the vague phrases "success or failure in competitive activities." This had to be so, because no modern writer of the kind I am discussing -- no one capable of using phrases like "objective considerations of contemporary phenomena" -- would ever tabulate his thoughts in that precise and detailed way. The whole tendency of modern prose is away from concreteness. Now analyze these two sentences a little more closely. The first contains forty-nine words but only sixty syllables, and all its words are those of everyday life. The second contains thirty-eight words of ninety syllables: eighteen of those words are from Latin roots, and one from Greek. The first sentence contains six vivid images, and only one phrase ("time and chance") that could be called vague. The second contains not a single fresh, arresting phrase, and in spite of its ninety syllables it gives only a shortened version of the meaning contained in the first. Yet without a doubt it is the second kind of sentence that is gaining ground in modern English. I do not want to exaggerate. This kind of writing is not yet universal, and outcrops of simplicity will occur here and there in the worst-written page. Still, if you or I were told to write a few lines on the uncertainty of human fortunes, we should probably come much nearer to my imaginary sentence than to the one from Ecclesiastes.
As I have tried to show, modern writing at its worst does not consist in picking out words for the sake of their meaning and inventing images in order to make the meaning clearer. It consists in gumming together long strips of words which have already been set in order by someone else, and making the results presentable by sheer humbug. The attraction of this way of writing is that it is easy. It is easier -- even quicker, once you have the habit -- to say In my opinion it is not an unjustifiable assumption that than to say I think. If you use ready-made phrases, you not only don't have to hunt about for the words; you also don't have to bother with the rhythms of your sentences since these phrases are generally so arranged as to be more or less euphonious. When you are composing in a hurry -- when you are dictating to a stenographer, for instance, or making a public speech -- it is natural to fall into a pretentious, Latinized style. Tags like a consideration which we should do well to bear in mind or a conclusion to which all of us would readily assent will save many a sentence from coming down with a bump. By using stale metaphors, similes, and idioms, you save much mental effort, at the cost of leaving your meaning vague, not only for your reader but for yourself. This is the significance of mixed metaphors. The sole aim of a metaphor is to call up a visual image. When these images clash -- as in The Fascist octopus has sung its swan song, the jackboot is thrown into the melting pot -- it can be taken as certain that the writer is not seeing a mental image of the objects he is naming; in other words he is not really thinking. Look again at the examples I gave at the beginning of this essay. Professor Laski (1) uses five negatives in fifty three words. One of these is superfluous, making nonsense of the whole passage, and in addition there is the slip -- alien for akin -- making further nonsense, and several avoidable pieces of clumsiness which increase the general vagueness. Professor Hogben (2) plays ducks and drakes with a battery which is able to write prescriptions, and, while disapproving of the everyday phrase put up with, is unwilling to look egregious up in the dictionary and see what it means; (3), if one takes an uncharitable attitude towards it, is simply meaningless: probably one could work out its intended meaning by reading the whole of the article in which it occurs. In (4), the writer knows more or less what he wants to say, but an accumulation of stale phrases chokes him like tea leaves blocking a sink. In (5), words and meaning have almost parted company. People who write in this manner usually have a general emotional meaning -- they dislike one thing and want to express solidarity with another -- but they are not interested in the detail of what they are saying. A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: 1. What am I trying to say? 2. What words will express it? 3. What image or idiom will make it clearer? 4. Is this image fresh enough to have an effect? And he will probably ask himself two more: 1. Could I put it more shortly? 2. Have I said anything that is avoidably ugly? But you are not obliged to go to all this trouble. You can shirk it by simply throwing your mind open and letting the ready-made phrases come crowding in. They will construct your sentences for you -- even think your thoughts for you, to a certain extent -- and at need they will perform the important service of partially concealing your meaning even from yourself. It is at this point that the special connection between politics and the debasement of language becomes clear.

..........

Virgil Caine
08-28-2009, 01:49 AM
In our time it is broadly true that political writing is bad writing. Where it is not true, it will generally be found that the writer is some kind of rebel, expressing his private opinions and not a "party line." Orthodoxy, of whatever color, seems to demand a lifeless, imitative style. The political dialects to be found in pamphlets, leading articles, manifestoes, White papers and the speeches of undersecretaries do, of course, vary from party to party, but they are all alike in that one almost never finds in them a fresh, vivid, homemade turn of speech. When one watches some tired hack on the platform mechanically repeating the familiar phrases -- bestial atrocities, iron heel, bloodstained tyranny, free peoples of the world, stand shoulder to shoulder -- one often has a curious feeling that one is not watching a live human being but some kind of dummy: a feeling which suddenly becomes stronger at moments when the light catches the speaker's spectacles and turns them into blank discs which seem to have no eyes behind them. And this is not altogether fanciful. A speaker who uses that kind of phraseology has gone some distance toward turning himself into a machine. The appropriate noises are coming out of his larynx, but his brain is not involved as it would be if he were choosing his words for himself. If the speech he is making is one that he is accustomed to make over and over again, he may be almost unconscious of what he is saying, as one is when one utters the responses in church. And this reduced state of consciousness, if not indispensable, is at any rate favorable to political conformity.
In our time, political speech and writing are largely the defense of the indefensible. Things like the continuance of British rule in India, the Russian purges and deportations, the dropping of the atom bombs on Japan, can indeed be defended, but only by arguments which are too brutal for most people to face, and which do not square with the professed aims of the political parties. Thus political language has to consist largely of euphemism., question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness. Defenseless villages are bombarded from the air, the inhabitants driven out into the countryside, the cattle machine-gunned, the huts set on fire with incendiary bullets: this is called pacification. Millions of peasants are robbed of their farms and sent trudging along the roads with no more than they can carry: this is called transfer of population or rectification of frontiers. People are imprisoned for years without trial, or shot in the back of the neck or sent to die of scurvy in Arctic lumber camps: this is called elimination of unreliable elements. Such phraseology is needed if one wants to name things without calling up mental pictures of them. Consider for instance some comfortable English professor defending Russian totalitarianism. He cannot say outright, "I believe in killing off your opponents when you can get good results by doing so." Probably, therefore, he will say something like this:
"While freely conceding that the Soviet regime exhibits certain features which the humanitarian may be inclined to deplore, we must, I think, agree that a certain curtailment of the right to political opposition is an unavoidable concomitant of transitional periods, and that the rigors which the Russian people have been called upon to undergo have been amply justified in the sphere of concrete achievement."
The inflated style itself is a kind of euphemism. A mass of Latin words falls upon the facts like soft snow, blurring the outline and covering up all the details. The great enemy of clear language is insincerity. When there is a gap between one's real and one's declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms, like a cuttlefish spurting out ink. In our age there is no such thing as "keeping out of politics." All issues are political issues, and politics itself is a mass of lies, evasions, folly, hatred, and schizophrenia. When the general atmosphere is bad, language must suffer. I should expect to find -- this is a guess which I have not sufficient knowledge to verify -- that the German, Russian and Italian languages have all deteriorated in the last ten or fifteen years, as a result of dictatorship.
But if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought. A bad usage can spread by tradition and imitation even among people who should and do know better. The debased language that I have been discussing is in some ways very convenient. Phrases like a not unjustifiable assumption, leaves much to be desired, would serve no good purpose, a consideration which we should do well to bear in mind, are a continuous temptation, a packet of aspirins always at one's elbow. Look back through this essay, and for certain you will find that I have again and again committed the very faults I am protesting against. By this morning's post I have received a pamphlet dealing with conditions in Germany. The author tells me that he "felt impelled" to write it. I open it at random, and here is almost the first sentence I see: "[The Allies] have an opportunity not only of achieving a radical transformation of Germany's social and political structure in such a way as to avoid a nationalistic reaction in Germany itself, but at the same time of laying the foundations of a co-operative and unified Europe." You see, he "feels impelled" to write -- feels, presumably, that he has something new to say -- and yet his words, like cavalry horses answering the bugle, group themselves automatically into the familiar dreary pattern. This invasion of one's mind by ready-made phrases (lay the foundations, achieve a radical transformation) can only be prevented if one is constantly on guard against them, and every such phrase anaesthetizes a portion of one's brain.
I said earlier that the decadence of our language is probably curable. Those who deny this would argue, if they produced an argument at all, that language merely reflects existing social conditions, and that we cannot influence its development by any direct tinkering with words and constructions. So far as the general tone or spirit of a language goes, this may be true, but it is not true in detail. Silly words and expressions have often disappeared, not through any evolutionary process but owing to the conscious action of a minority. Two recent examples were explore every avenue and leave no stone unturned, which were killed by the jeers of a few journalists. There is a long list of flyblown metaphors which could similarly be got rid of if enough people would interest themselves in the job; and it should also be possible to laugh the not un- formation out of existence*, to reduce the amount of Latin and Greek in the average sentence, to drive out foreign phrases
________________________________________
*One can cure oneself of the not un- formation by memorizing this sentence: A not unblack dog was chasing a not unsmall rabbit across a not ungreen field.
________________________________________
and strayed scientific words, and, in general, to make pretentiousness unfashionable. But all these are minor points. The defense of the English language implies more than this, and perhaps it is best to start by saying what it does not imply.

..........

Virgil Caine
08-28-2009, 01:50 AM
To begin with it has nothing to do with archaism, with the salvaging of obsolete words and turns of speech, or with the setting up of a "standard English" which must never be departed from. On the contrary, it is especially concerned with the scrapping of every word or idiom which has outworn its usefulness. It has nothing to do with correct grammar and syntax, which are of no importance so long as one makes one's meaning clear, or with the avoidance of Americanisms, or with having what is called a "good prose style." On the other hand, it is not concerned with fake simplicity and the attempt to make written English colloquial. Nor does it even imply in every case preferring the Saxon word to the Latin one, though it does imply using the fewest and shortest words that will cover one's meaning. What is above all needed is to let the meaning choose the word, and not the other way around. In prose, the worst thing one can do with words is surrender to them. When you think of a concrete object, you think wordlessly, and then, if you want to describe the thing you have been visualizing you probably hunt about until you find the exact words that seem to fit it. When you think of something abstract you are more inclined to use words from the start, and unless you make a conscious effort to prevent it, the existing dialect will come rushing in and do the job for you, at the expense of blurring or even changing your meaning. Probably it is better to put off using words as long as possible and get one's meaning as clear as one can through pictures and sensations. Afterward one can choose -- not simply accept -- the phrases that will best cover the meaning, and then switch round and decide what impressions one's words are likely to make on another person. This last effort of the mind cuts out all stale or mixed images, all prefabricated phrases, needless repetitions, and humbug and vagueness generally. But one can often be in doubt about the effect of a word or a phrase, and one needs rules that one can rely on when instinct fails. I think the following rules will cover most cases:
(i) Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
(ii) Never us a long word where a short one will do.
(iii) If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
(iv) Never use the passive where you can use the active.
(v) Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
(vi) Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.
These rules sound elementary, and so they are, but they demand a deep change of attitude in anyone who has grown used to writing in the style now fashionable. One could keep all of them and still write bad English, but one could not write the kind of stuff that I quoted in those five specimens at the beginning of this article.
I have not here been considering the literary use of language, but merely language as an instrument for expressing and not for concealing or preventing thought. Stuart Chase and others have come near to claiming that all abstract words are meaningless, and have used this as a pretext for advocating a kind of political quietism. Since you don't know what Fascism is, how can you struggle against Fascism? One need not swallow such absurdities as this, but one ought to recognize that the present political chaos is connected with the decay of language, and that one can probably bring about some improvement by starting at the verbal end. If you simplify your English, you are freed from the worst follies of orthodoxy. You cannot speak any of the necessary dialects, and when you make a stupid remark its stupidity will be obvious, even to yourself. Political language -- and with variations this is true of all political parties, from Conservatives to Anarchists -- is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind. One cannot change this all in a moment, but one can at least change one's own habits, and from time to time one can even, if one jeers loudly enough, send some worn-out and useless phrase -- some jackboot, Achilles' heel, hotbed, melting pot, acid test, veritable inferno, or other lump of verbal refuse -- into the dustbin, where it belongs.

..........

Source
09-05-2009, 08:41 PM
Just read 'The First Commandment' from Brad Thor.

Really like the fast phased story.

ISBN: 987-1-84739-194-0

braydenking
09-28-2009, 07:00 AM
Learn more because my english poor,so sorry for that !

Junito-Rulez
09-28-2009, 01:53 PM
A hundred years of solitude by Garcia Marquez.

SlickRikki
09-28-2009, 06:18 PM
Bentley Little's The Association,It's an amazing Fiction Novel

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n5/n26108.jpg

MANGLER
03-30-2010, 03:10 AM
Bloods by Wallace Terry. Great book about the plight of black soldiers in Vietnam.