View Full Version : Up and down the stairs better then running?


Alex.B
04-09-2006, 09:50 AM
i was thinking,if some one goes up the stairs up and down 10 times,its 100meter up and 100 meter down,equles to about 1km,is it better then just running 1km in a stright line?
thanks

ferocity
04-09-2006, 10:19 AM
Its a great exercise for a boxer but running is still a very important part of a boxers conditioning.

Alex.B
04-09-2006, 11:10 AM
ok thanks,but is it better then runing the same distance?

TheHoff!
04-09-2006, 11:51 AM
I'm not really sure about comparing the merits of going up and down stairs to actual roadwork but during the Diaz - cotto fight the commentators said that Diaz doesnt do any roadwork for conditioning. He just swims and uses the stairmaster at the gym...and Diaz looked in great shape so maybe there is something to be said for it, but i suppose you have to take into account that he wasnt just using the stairmaster only, but swimming as well which is an excellent anaerobic exercise.

I would say that just going up and down stairs has gotta be boring as hell though. At least with the roadwork the scenery changes and hills vary the intensity.

Alex.B
04-09-2006, 12:10 PM
i prefer going up and down the stairs.
i think the stair master at the gym is not as effective as really going up and down the stairs,what do you think?

TheHoff!
04-09-2006, 12:29 PM
To be honest I havent really tried just going up and down the stairs because I think I'd probably get bored after about five minutes. At my gym at least I can watch tv or admire ladies in lycra while I'm there, but I rarely use cardiovascular equipment at the gym. I go running for that and just use the gym for weights.

You might be right about the stairmaster compared to real stairs though, occassionally I use the stairmaster just for the fitness test. I put it on almost the highest setting but still dont get anywhere near my maximum heart rate...I would imagine real stairs is a harder workout.

Alex.B
04-09-2006, 12:31 PM
i did like 2km on real stairs and let me tell you,when i finshed i was ****ed up,its 10 times harder then running,my heart rate was off the roof.

Kid Achilles
04-09-2006, 12:33 PM
Yeah you aren't going to get bored running stairs. Exhausted yeah, but not bored. Still I'd do some traditional roadwork on top of that if I were you. Think of the stairs as wind sprint type stuff. An important supplement, but not a replacement, for running and jogging.

Alex.B
04-09-2006, 12:34 PM
ok thanks :)
well im going to the boxing gym will be back in like 2 hours

PunchDrunk
04-09-2006, 12:36 PM
I'm not really sure about comparing the merits of going up and down stairs to actual roadwork but during the Diaz - cotto fight the commentators said that Diaz doesnt do any roadwork for conditioning. He just swims and uses the stairmaster at the gym...and Diaz looked in great shape so maybe there is something to be said for it, but i suppose you have to take into account that he wasnt just using the stairmaster only, but swimming as well which is an excellent anaerobic exercise.

I would say that just going up and down stairs has gotta be boring as hell though. At least with the roadwork the scenery changes and hills vary the intensity.

How is swimming anaerobic exercise??

TheHoff!
04-09-2006, 12:44 PM
How is swimming anaerobic exercise??
I find swimming harder than roadwork. I can run for an hour or more but after swimming about ten or eleven lengths I'm done.

opethdrums
04-09-2006, 03:32 PM
stairmaster is harder than stairs. you set your time and your speed and you cant get off untill youre done. you cant slow down you cant speed up to get it over with. its just constant attrition. i set it so it gets harder and harder and harder then drops 3 times in a 10 minute period w no break. at the hardest im practically running up the stairs

swimming is a mix of anaerobic and aerobic. when you hold your breath and exert yourself it's 100% anaerobic

PunchDrunk
04-09-2006, 06:10 PM
I find swimming harder than roadwork. I can run for an hour or more but after swimming about ten or eleven lengths I'm done.

That doesn't make it anaerobic.

TheHoff!
04-09-2006, 06:55 PM
That doesn't make it anaerobic.
What I was trying to say was that it is good for training in your anaerobic zone which is about 80 to 89% of your maximum heart rate and will improve your heart/lungs and produce a higher lactate tolerance ability and hence improve endurance. When i am running i can train at this level for long periods of time but when I am swimming I can only do it for a much shorter period of time...I believe that when you are swimming (particularly front crawl) because your head is under water for a lot of the time you are forced to be more economical and efficient with your breathing which imo would probably improve your cardiovascular system.

PunchDrunk
04-09-2006, 08:06 PM
What I was trying to say was that it is good for training in your anaerobic zone which is about 80 to 89% of your maximum heart rate and will improve your heart/lungs and produce a higher lactate tolerance ability and hence improve endurance. When i am running i can train at this level for long periods of time but when I am swimming I can only do it for a much shorter period of time...I believe that when you are swimming (particularly front crawl) because your head is under water for a lot of the time you are forced to be more economical and efficient with your breathing which imo would probably improve your cardiovascular system.

First of all, anaerobic work has nothing to do with heartrate. Lifting a heavy weight one time, for instance, is anaerobic work and this hardly puts any stress on your heartrate. Obviously, if you do it long enough, your heartrate will skyrocket, but that doesn't make heartrate the parameter by which anaerobic exercise is defined.
Second, the fact that you can run for longer than you can swim, only means that the intensity by which you swim is higher than your running intensity. Still, an intensity where you can swim 10-11 lengths is NOT anaerobic! And running/jogging is not anaerobic either. Sprinting is anaerobic, which is why you can only do it for 10 seconds before your pace slows considerably.

You should probably think twice about giving out advice, when you clearly don't know what the terms you use actually mean...

TheHoff!
04-09-2006, 08:15 PM
What I was talking about was your anaerobic training zone as described here: http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/hrm1.htm
which is different to actual anaerobic exercise i accept and apologise for any confusion.

yrrej
04-09-2006, 11:02 PM
Running up and down a steep hill (up fast, down slow) is better than stairs, because, when you get tired, you might miss a step and fall, either going up or coming down, which can have a bad ending on stairs....

PunchDrunk
04-10-2006, 04:27 AM
What I was talking about was your anaerobic training zone as described here: http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/hrm1.htm
which is different to actual anaerobic exercise i accept and apologise for any confusion.

Aah, well I see that you actually used the term anaerobic zone in your previous post, so I guess I'll have to take my part of the blame... It takes two to create a misunderstanding, I guess. :)

LHWchamp5
04-10-2006, 11:19 AM
Running at stadiums.. does anybody run the stairs at stadiums?? is it open to anybody or to you have to arrange it?? lil advice would be good.

-EX-
04-10-2006, 06:33 PM
I've gone up and down the stairs before. I don't know the comparison but I can't see why it wouldn't be a good workout.

fraidycat
04-10-2006, 06:59 PM
I posted this in another thread, but I'm blessed to have a monster flight of stairs all the way up the hill where I live, 237 steps in 5 flights covering a couple of blocks. F--king murderous. It's my morning run, an hour on the steps. I can run it 4 times now, and then have to walk them the rest of the hour. When I started, about 3 months ago, I had to walk it the whole time -- I couldn't even run up the first flight. It must be great conditioning, since a lot of people run it in the morning and even more seem to in the afternoon.