View Full Version : Black History Month!


Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 03:23 PM
This is black history month, so i will show biographies and photos of the three black heavyweights, that were the most important to black equality and civil rights, first jack johnson, then joe louis, then finally muhammad ali!

http://webzoom.freewebs.com/4dsports/BOXING%20JACK%20JOHNSON%20PHOTO.jpg jack johnson

http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/B0000TZ8H6.02.LZZZZZZZ.jpg joe louis

http://www.posterworx.co.nz/images/film_tv/Aa882MuhammadAli-f.jpg muhammad ali

:boxing:

Oasis_Lad
02-07-2006, 03:24 PM
should be a good thread i look foward to seeing more

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 03:27 PM
should be a good thread i look foward to seeing more

also feel free to post photos or info about any afriacan american boxer you like.

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 03:47 PM
Johnson boxed, lived on his own terms

By Ron Flatter
Special to ESPN.com


Easy question: Who was the man named Jack who broke a color barrier in sports?



Harder question: Name another.



Harder because it happened so long ago. But in 1908, 39 years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in major league baseball, there was Jack Johnson -- the first black man to hold the world heavyweight championship.



Johnson is still considered one of the best, most powerful counter-punchers who ever stepped in a ring. Once he won the title, he would not relinquish it for more than six years.



But Johnson is often remembered more for a flamboyant lifestyle that, coupled with his skin color in "White America," inspired unprecedented controversy and even rioting.



He transformed himself from the docks of Galveston, Texas, to early 20th-century glitterati. He had his own jazz band, owned a Chicago nightclub, acted on stage, drove flashy yellow sports cars, reputedly walked his pet leopard while sipping champagne, flaunted gold teeth that went with his gold-handled walking stick and boasted of his conquests of whites -- both in and out of the ring.



Johnson kept the company of some of his era's most desired women, most of them white. Moulin Rouge star Mistinguette. German spy Mata Hari. Sex symbols Lupe Velez and Mae West. Johnson was romantically linked to all.



Johnson was also a fugitive for seven years, having been accused of violating a white slavery act with a woman who would become his third wife.



All these things would have been lost in obscurity were it not for the fact Johnson was the most dominant boxer of his time. The Ring Record Book lists his record as 79-8 with 46 knockouts, 12 draws and 14 no-decisions.

If there was one fight that forged Johnson's celebrity, it was against Jim Jeffries, the former heavyweight champ who had been in retirement five years. Famed promoter Tex Rickard lured more than 22,000 fans to Reno, Nev., on July 4, 1910 for the first "Fight of the Century," the bout matching the outspoken African-American against "The Great White Hope."



Johnson became the first to floor Jeffries, whose corner gave up in the 15th round. "I could never have whipped Johnson at my best," Jeffries said. "I couldn't have hit him. No, I couldn't have reached him in 1,000 years."



The incredible sum of $117,000 that Johnson earned that day was about as far from his roots as he could have imagined. Born March 31, 1878, John Arthur Johnson would spend much of his childhood working on the boats and sculleries of his native Galveston.



He grew to be 6 feet, 1 1/4 inches and a giant of a young man who hung out with older fighters in Chicago, New York and Boston. He moved to California in 1901 and, on Feb. 3, 1903, in Los Angeles, won the "Colored Heavyweight Championship of the World" with a 20-round decision over Denver Ed Martin.



A year later, Johnson issued a challenge to Jeffries, who held the world title at the time. But Jeffries wouldn't fight an African-American.



It wouldn't be until Dec. 26, 1908, that Johnson would finally get his shot at the title. He got it for the simplest of reasons. Champion Tommy Burns was guaranteed $30,000 to fight him.



The bout was held on the outskirts of Sydney. Australia may have been a hotbed of boxing at the time, but it was no more sympathetic to a black than "White America" was. Accounts of the fight indicated that few among the 20,000 at Rushcutter's Bay cheered for Johnson.



Burns, who was 24 pounds lighter than the 192-pound Johnson, was practically out on his feet in the 14th round when the police jumped into the ring and stopped the fight. Referee Hugh McIntosh awarded the championship to Johnson.

Popular novelist Jack London wrote in a New York newspaper that it was a match "between a colossus and a pygmy. Burns was a toy in his hands. Jim Jeffries must emerge from his alfalfa farm and remove the golden smile from Johnson's face. Jeff, it's up to you."



But Jeffries wasn't biting yet. Johnson was a champion without an opponent. He fought two exhibitions and three no-decisions before meeting middleweight champ Stanley Ketchel on Oct. 16, 1909, in Colma, Calif.



The 205 1/2-pound Johnson knocked out the 170 1/4-pound Ketchel in the 12th round with a devastating right to the jaw, one of the hardest blows ever delivered. Five of the challenger's teeth were ripped off at the roots.



The next year, the landmark fight was arranged between Johnson and Jeffries. Even though interracial business was pretty risky back then, the fight was a financial boon to its promoter, who spent lavishly on pre-fight advertising.



After whipping Jeffries, Johnson didn't fight for two years, but he made waves out of the ring. In January 1911, he married for the second time. The bride was Etta Duryea, a white divorced woman from high society. The marriage ended tragically only eight months later, when Duryea committed suicide.



A week after successfully defending his championship against Jim Flynn on July 4, 1912, Johnson opened Cafe de Champion, his Chicago nightclub. That year, he was frequently in the company of Lucille Cameron, a white secretary.



In the court of Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, the future commissioner of baseball, Johnson was charged with taking Cameron across state lines for "immoral purposes," a violation of the Mann white slavery act. With the charge hanging over him, Johnson married Cameron on Dec. 4, 1912.



The following spring, Johnson was convicted, sentenced to a year and a day in prison and fined $1,000. Johnson was free pending an appeal when he and Cameron fled the country.



Johnson spent the next seven years on the lam. In Paris, he took on a series of farcical matches against wrestlers. He fought exhibitions in Buenos Aires for measly purses.



He finally met his match in Havana, Cuba, on April 5, 1915. More than 25,000 came to see him take on 6-foot, 6 1/4-inch, 230-pound Jess Willard. At age 37, Johnson had a noticeable paunch and looked anything but ready for the scheduled 45-round bout. Still, he dominated the fight until the 20th round.



In Round 26, Willard penetrated Johnson's withering defense with a hard right to the head. Johnson was knocked out, and Willard was the new champ. There have been rumors ever since that Johnson threw the fight.



Johnson went to Spain, then Mexico, fighting off and on until he returned to America and surrendered to federal authorities in 1920. He was sent to prison in Leavenworth, Kansas, where he boxed five times before being released on July 9, 1921.



In his 40s, Johnson fought in Cuba, Canada and Mexico before returning to the United States for the last two sanctioned fights of his career -- knockout losses in Kansas to Ed "Bearcat" Wright and Big Bill Hartwell in the spring of 1928. Johnson was 50.



By then, Johnson had divorced Cameron and married Irene Pineau, another white woman. If that wedding was not perceived as trouble enough for Johnson, his non-sanctioned fights in 1931 against Brad Simmons led to his being banned from boxing in Kansas.



If Johnson lived in the fast lane, he died there literally -- in an automobile accident in Raleigh, N.C., on June 10, 1946. He was 68. Eight years later, he became a charter member of the Boxing Hall of Fame.

Next up, Joe Louis!

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 04:12 PM
http://www.aaregistry.com/african_american_history/1044/The_Champ_patents_a_wrench

RockyMarcianofan00
02-07-2006, 04:22 PM
Joe Louis was a great fighter
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c49/IrishInsomniac00/JoeLouis.jpg
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Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 04:42 PM
http://coxscorner.tripod.com/Images/johnson_jeff.jpg

RockyMarcianofan00
02-07-2006, 04:44 PM
Jefferies was way out of shape for the fight, I think he may have won had it been his prime o well, i guess you could call it karma, or what goes around comes around and KO's you :boxing:
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Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 04:46 PM
Jefferies was way out of shape for the fight, I think he may have won had it been his prime o well, i guess you could call it karma, or what goes around comes around and KO's you :boxing:

i doubt it, jeffries stated himself johnson would have whupped him in his prime, cause johnson was too fast and he wouldn't be able to hit him.

Oasis_Lad
02-07-2006, 04:47 PM
http://coxscorner.tripod.com/Images/johnson_jeff.jpg

who else thinks jeffries looks like a smaller valuev from the side

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 04:50 PM
who else thinks jeffries looks like a smaller valuev from the side

haha, lol!

Yaman
02-07-2006, 04:52 PM
http://coxscorner.tripod.com/Images/johnson_jeff.jpg

Jeffries was a racist?
Im glad he kicked his ass :mad:

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 04:54 PM
Jeffries was a racist?
Im glad he kicked his ass :mad:

he sure was, sullivan, fitsimmons, corbett, and jeffries were all racist.

there's a myth that dempsey was racist but that's not true, though.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-07-2006, 04:57 PM
who else thinks jeffries looks like a smaller valuev from the side
the average fighter back then was only 5'9 and Johnson towers him at 6'0

i'm not sure jefferies actual height 5'8?
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RockyMarcianofan00
02-07-2006, 04:58 PM
Jack Dempsey was a great fighter
I wish he had fought Jack Johnson
________
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Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 05:00 PM
Jack Dempsey was a great fighter
I wish he had fought Jack Johnson

by that time though dempsey would have won though.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-07-2006, 05:00 PM
he sure was, sullivan, fitsimmons, corbett, and jeffries were all racist.

there's a myth that dempsey was racist but that's not true, though.
well to be honest with you be4 the 1920's everyone was a racist

all blacks hated whites
all whites hated blacks
- for the most part there are exceptions
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Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 05:01 PM
well to be honest with you be4 the 1920's everyone was a racist

all blacks hated whites
all whites hated blacks
- for the most part there are exceptions

well, blacks had a reason to and whites had no reason.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-07-2006, 05:04 PM
Well actually if you look back black people actually black ppl were very mean to white ppl (when they could be) but probably because of the fact they were inslaved, what ppl don't relize is be4 blacks were captured and africa and brought over most of them were already slaves to there own culture

but whatever this isn't really a race issue

slavery's wrong whether its blacks on blacks or whites on blacks or any other way
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Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 05:09 PM
Well actually if you look back black people actually black ppl were very mean to white ppl (when they could be) but probably because of the fact they were inslaved, what ppl don't relize is be4 blacks were captured and africa and brought over most of them were already slaves to there own culture

but whatever this isn't really a race issue

slavery's wrong whether its blacks on blacks or whites on blacks or any other way

yeah, you're right.

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 05:28 PM
"I made a lot of mistakes out of the ring, but I never made any in it."

http://coxscorner.tripod.com/Images/johnsonchi1b.jpg

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 05:44 PM
by the way good karma and points would be nice! :D

Kid Achilles
02-07-2006, 05:46 PM
Jeffries was actually taller than Johnson at around 6'1" or 6'2".

Oasis_Lad
02-07-2006, 05:46 PM
10 m donated to butterfly successfully

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 05:49 PM
10 m donated to butterfly successfully

thanks alot!!

http://www.milesdavis.com/images/covers/082%20Jack%20Johnson%20Vid.jpg

http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblackness/images/home_sigimage_top.jpg

Yogi
02-07-2006, 06:17 PM
The Black Prince gets screwed again! :(

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 06:20 PM
The Black Prince gets screwed again! :(

i don't get it. :confused:

Yogi
02-07-2006, 06:23 PM
i don't get it. :confused:

That's the great Peter Jackson, Butterfly...Ever heard of him?

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 06:24 PM
That's the great Peter Jackson, Butterfly...Ever heard of him?

yeah, i've heard of him.

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 06:27 PM
That's the great Peter Jackson, Butterfly...Ever heard of him?

but he didn't win the title.

Yogi
02-07-2006, 06:35 PM
but he didn't win the title.

True, but he very likely would have if given the opportunity to fight Sullivan in the late 1880's and even Sullivan's own manager seems to think so;

"In fact, William Muldoon, Sullivan's manager, told boxing historian Nat Fleischer years later that he had kept Sullivan from making a match with Jackson because he wanted to "save Sullivan the humiliation of being defeated by a Negro.""

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 06:36 PM
True, but he very likely would have if given the opportunity to fight Sullivan in the late 1880's and even Sullivan's own manager seems to think so;

"In fact, William Muldoon, Sullivan's manager, told boxing historian Nat Fleischer years later that he had kept Sullivan from making a match with Jackson because he wanted to "save Sullivan the humiliation of being defeated by a Negro.""

sullivan wouldn't want to fight him anyway, cause of his racist ass.

Yogi
02-07-2006, 07:00 PM
sullivan wouldn't want to fight him anyway, cause of his racist ass.

I don't think it's only that Sullivan was racist and refused to fight black men, because Sullivan was said to have fought one black man earlier in his career, and did also jump into the ring challenging George Godfrey on at least one occasion before he won the title (after Godfrey/Kilrain, I think it was)...I think the more racist angle with Sullivan was that he didn't want to LOSE his championship to a black man, which may have likely been the case had he fought Jackson when there was so much clamour for that fight.

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 07:02 PM
'Brown Bomber' was a hero to all

By Larry Schwartz
Special to ESPN.com


"Even white folks on the job that would say ****** 50 times a day, that would say boy this and boy that, would light up when they talked about Joe," says civil rights activist Dick Gregory about Joe Louis on ESPN Classic's SportsCentury series.






Louis finished his career with a 68-3 record, including 54 knockouts.The son of an Alabama sharecropper, great grandson of a slave, great great grandson of a white slave owner became the first African-American to achieve lasting fame and popularity in the 20th century.



In a time when his own people were still subject to lynchings, discrimination and oppression, when the military was segregated and African-Americans weren't permitted to play major league baseball, Joe Louis was the first African-American to achieve the kind of hero worship that was previously reserved for whites only. When he started boxing in the thirties, there were no African-Americans in positions of public prominence, none who commanded attention from whites.



"What my father did was enable white America to think of him as an American, not as a black," said his son, Joe Louis Jr. "By winning, he became white America's first black hero."



Louis was heavyweight champion of the world in an era when the heavyweight champion was, in the minds of many, the greatest man in the world. Jack Johnson, the first African-American heavyweight champ, wasn't popular with whites. Louis, on the other hand, converted all into his corner. When "The Brown Bomber" avenged his loss to Germany's Max Schmeling - viewed as a Nazi symbol - the entire country celebrated, not just African-Americans.



Louis' war-time patriotism in a racially divided country made him a symbol of national unity and purpose. Twice he donated his purse to military relief funds. He endeared himself even more to the American public when he said the U.S. would win World War II "because we're on God's side."


Louis received the Legion of Merit for his service during World War II.


While some accused Louis of being an Uncle Tom, others realized it wasn't in his training or character to be militant. His uncommon sense of dignity, exemplified by his refusal to be pictured with a slice of watermelon, increased his popularity.



When some called Louis "a credit to his race," sportswriter Jimmy Cannon responded, "Yes, Louis is a credit to his race - the human race."



He also was a credit to boxing, which often contributes to the worst in the human race. His championship reign, from 1937 until he stepped down in 1949, is the longest of any heavyweight. With his powerful left jab, his destructive two-fisted attack that he released with accuracy at short range, and his capacity for finishing a wounded opponent, the 6-foot-1 fighter defeated all 25 of his challengers, another record.



He finished his career with a record of 68-3, with 54 knockouts, according to The Boxing Register.



Louis also was a winner with women. Though married four times, including twice to his first wife, he discreetly enjoyed the company of both African-American and white women, including Lena Horne, Sonja Henie and Lana Turner.



He was born Joseph Louis Barrow on May 13, 1914, in a shack in the cotton-field country near Lafayette, Ala. Besides being African-American, he also was part Indian and part white. His father was committed to a state hospital for the mentally ill before he was two.



His mother heard her husband had died (he hadn't, though) and remarried. The children slept three to a bed in Alabama before the family moved to Detroit in the twenties. Joe was learning cabinetmaking in a vocational school and taking violin lessons when he turned to boxing at the request of a schoolmate.



Fighting under the name Joe Louis, so his mother wouldn't find out, he won 50 of 54 amateur bouts and gained the attention of John Roxborough, king of the numbers rackets in Detroit's African-American neighborhoods. Roxborough and Julian Black, a speakeasy owner who also ran numbers, convinced Louis to turn pro in 1934 and they became his managers.


To shape the fighter's image, Roxborough publicized seven commandments, which would be inoffensive to white Americans. They included: Never be photographed with a white woman, never gloat over a fallen (read white) opponent, never engage in fixed fights, and live and fight clean.


Louis won his first 27 fights, 23 by knockout, with his most impressive victories being a sixth-round TKO of Primo Carnera and a fourth-round KO of Max Baer, both former heavyweight champions. His undefeated streak ended on June 19, 1936 when Schmeling, another former champion, detected a ***** in Louis' armor: Because Louis carried his left hand low, he was vulnerable to a counter right.



In the fourth round, Schmeling's overhand right dropped Louis, who never recovered, though he lasted until the 12th before two rights by Schmeling ended the fight. In the dressing room, Louis cried.



His road to the title had merely taken a detour. On June 22, 1937, he became the first African-American champ since Johnson when he dethroned James Braddock, knocking out "The Cinderella Man" in the eighth round. "For one night, in all the darktowns of America, the black man was king," wrote Alistair Cooke.



Louis became a symbol of African-American power in a time when they felt powerless. "Every Negro boy old enough to walk wanted to be the next Brown Bomber," said Malcolm X, the murdered leader of the militant Black Muslims.



Exactly one year later, Louis exacted his revenge on Schmeling. The fight was for more than the heavyweight championship, more than two individuals competing. It was built into a battle of two ideologies.





Louis In one corner was Schmeling, representing Hitler (though Schmeling wasn't a Nazi) and everything fascism stood for. In the other corner was Louis, representing the U.S. and everything democracy meant. Louis was invited to the White House, where President Franklin Roosevelt felt the champ's biceps. "Joe, we need muscles like yours to beat Germany," he said.




There were reports of messages to Schmeling from Hitler warning him that he had better win for the glory of the Third Reich. Hitler hailed him as a paragon of Teutonic manhood, and telephoned him personally before he left the dressing room.



Schmeling wasn't gone from the room long. Before some 70,000 fans at Yankee Stadium, Louis pulverized the reluctant Aryan figurehead, knocking him to the canvas three times. Two years of waiting ended for Louis after 124 seconds, with Schmeling lying broken on the canvas. Louis had crossed the line from champion to idol as Americans of all color and ancestry celebrated.



He went through a "Bum of the Month" club until he met former light-heavyweight champ Billy Conn on June 18, 1941. It appeared as if Louis were about to lose his title; after 12 rounds, he trailed by three and two rounds on two officials' scorecards. But Conn ignored his corner's instruction to box with caution, and the result was Louis knocking him out with two seconds left in the 13th round.



Louis enlisted in the Army in 1942 and fought close to 100 exhibitions before some two million servicemen. After the war, he knocked out Conn again ("He can run, but he can't hide") and won three other fights, including two with Jersey Joe Walcott, before abdicating his title.



However, in need of money because the IRS was hounding him for back taxes, he returned to the ring. After not fighting for two years, he lost a one-sided decision to his successor as champ, Ezzard Charles, in 1950 and retired for good when Rocky Marciano knocked him out in the eighth round in 1951.



Louis' fights earned him close to $5 million, but the money went like three-minute rounds, mostly due to his extravagances and generosity. The IRS, conveniently forgetting Louis' generosity during the war, demanded a reported $1.25 million in back taxes, interest and penalties, and he suffered the humiliation of pro wrestling to help pay his debts.



In 1970, his family committed him to a Denver psychiatric hospital because of his cocaine addiction and paranoia. After leaving the hospital later that year, he returned to Las Vegas, where he was an "official greeter" at Caesars Palace.



Louis spent his last four years in a wheelchair before dying of a heart attack at 66 on April 12, 1981 in Las Vegas. He was given a military burial in Arlington National Cemetery at the request of President Ronald Reagan. In death, like in life, Joe Louis was a hero.

Next up, Muhammad Ali!

Kid Achilles
02-07-2006, 07:31 PM
Joe Louis, the greatest and most important heavyweight champion of them all.

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 07:33 PM
Joe Louis, the greatest and most important heavyweight champion of them all.

if that's your opinion.

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 07:40 PM
http://www.congressionalgoldmedal.com/JoeLouisPrivate.jpg

joeboxer
02-07-2006, 07:42 PM
In honor of black history month, I have decided not to make fun of butterfly for 1 whole day.

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 07:49 PM
In honor of black history month, I have decided not to make fun of butterfly for 1 whole day.

i don't even remember you making fun of me at all, oh well.

Yogi
02-07-2006, 07:55 PM
i don't even remember you making fun of me at all, oh well.

Everybody makes fun of you man, and that's pretty much an hourly thing with all of us on here. But we do that in a private section of the forums that you don't and never will have access to.

Dempsey 1919
02-07-2006, 07:56 PM
Everybody makes fun of you man, and that's pretty much an hourly thing with all of us on here. But we do that in a private section of the forums that you don't and never will have access to.

that's brutal.

Yogi
02-07-2006, 08:01 PM
that's brutal.

Yeah, you think that's brutal? :o

Well I was going to tell you what the Butterfly topic of the hour was, but now that I think about it, it might be best if I abide by mother's saying of "if you don't have something nice to say, don't say anything at all"...Don't want to hurt anybody's feelings or nothing.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-08-2006, 12:33 AM
yes Joe Louis was a great champion, he was a great fighter with KO power in either hand he defeate great fighters and he fought for our country

how much more could you ask from a champion
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Dempsey 1919
02-08-2006, 02:19 AM
I made the most of my ability and I did my best with my title.

http://faculty.washington.edu/qtaylor/images/louis_joe.jpg

LondonRingRules
02-08-2006, 05:51 AM
========= sullivan, fitsimmons, corbett, and jeffries were all racist.========

** Jack Johnson was more racist. You should study up on the 3 black HOF heavies he avoided giving title shots to and he had many more title defenses than did Fitz and Corbett. At any rate, Fitz fought black fighters and there was no credible black contender available for him to defend against. Jeffries also gave Griffin a chance in a non title fight. Had Jeff lost his title would have been worthless. You know, Griffin, the guy who whipped Jack Johnson.

Are you racist, or do you just make up accusations for amusement?

LondonRingRules
02-08-2006, 06:00 AM
This is black history month, so i will show biographies and photos of the three black heavyweights, that were the most important to black equality and civil rights, first jack johnson, then joe louis, then finally muhammad ali!

http://webzoom.freewebs.com/4dsports/BOXING%20JACK%20JOHNSON%20PHOTO.jpg jack johnson

http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/B0000TZ8H6.02.LZZZZZZZ.jpg joe louis

http://www.posterworx.co.nz/images/film_tv/Aa882MuhammadAli-f.jpg muhammad ali

:boxing:
** Don't see how Johnson advanced black civil rights at all and many if not most black leaders back then felt the same way. Ali was a black seperatist during his title reign and a member of a militant black cult that opposed the work of MLK.

They may be heroes to modern black folk, but only Ali could have said to redeem himself by his work and his life.

joeboxer
02-08-2006, 06:23 AM
Black history month is a disgrace.



It's as if to say that because blacks have been marginalized for centuries we will offer one month of remembrance to them and that makes it ok.


Who the **** said black history could fit in a month. Why not 6 months, or 11. Or black history year.


Its not like I forgot the same lame ass Martin Luther King Documentary that PBS did last year, and this year, do I really need to see it next year.


No, black history month is a sham, invented by white people to further marginalize and embarass black people.


Ever wonder why Al Sharpton ran for President and not Colin Powell ??? Equality is a sham that white people have fooled black people into believing can exist or ever will exist.

leff
02-08-2006, 10:20 AM
nice thread butterfly, karma on its way

angelo_dundee
02-08-2006, 01:26 PM
This is black history month, so i will show biographies and photos of the three black heavyweights, that were the most important to black equality and civil rights, first jack johnson, then joe louis, then finally muhammad ali!

http://webzoom.freewebs.com/4dsports/BOXING%20JACK%20JOHNSON%20PHOTO.jpg jack johnson

http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/B0000TZ8H6.02.LZZZZZZZ.jpg joe louis

http://www.posterworx.co.nz/images/film_tv/Aa882MuhammadAli-f.jpg muhammad ali

:boxing:


Back in school I always found this BH month boring. It was required, but mostly teachers were cool and didnt force it.

Dempsey 1919
02-08-2006, 06:23 PM
http://www.radiomemoriesnetwork.com/joe_louis_max_schmeling_1936.jpg

http://sportsmed.starwave.com/i/classic/0919/photo/c_jlouis3_hi.jpg

http://www.rounderstore.com/retail/images/catalog/8216111062_0.JPG

Dempsey 1919
02-08-2006, 07:37 PM
"He can run but he can't hide."

http://members.tripod.com/coxscorner/louispics/louis_bbaer2b.jpg

Dempsey 1919
02-08-2006, 07:40 PM
"Once that bell rings you're on your own. It's just you and the other guy."

http://img.timeinc.net/time/magazine/archive/covers/1941/1101410929_400.jpg

Heckler
02-08-2006, 07:48 PM
Muhammad Ali's affliliation with the nation of islam was loose. Later in his career and in the present he dismissed seperatism and converted to orthodox Islam. The nation of Islam thought white people were the devil, and it becomes quite clear that Ali did not... from his relationship with Howard Corsell (was actually a good one) to his respect for Angelo Dundee. He was young man who was obviously angered at the way blacks were treated as inferiors... joining the nation of islam was his way of fighting back. People try to make out that he was controlled, he was influenced by the nation of islam but he definately expressed his own views and by merely listening to him talk you will see this.

Dempsey 1919
02-09-2006, 02:48 PM
He is simply...the greatest

By Larry Schwartz
Special to ESPN.com


"If you had told somebody in 1968 that in 1996 Muhammad Ali would be the most beloved individual on earth, and the mere sight of him holding an Olympic torch would bring people to tears, you'd have won a lot of bets," says Bryant Gumbel on ESPN Classic's SportsCentury series.



He boasted he was "The Greatest," and in the prime of his charismatic career, many agreed. But as brilliant as Muhammad Ali was in the ring, perhaps his true greatness was outside it, when he fought the United States government. His refusal to accept induction into the armed forces on religious grounds cost him millions and his heavyweight title, but, in the end, Ali came up victorious in the most significant battle of his life.

Vince Lombardi took a look at Ali's speed and power and thought one thing: "linebacker."

Sports is filled with showmen, and with great athletes, but perhaps never were they better combined than in the young man who began life as Cassius Clay and became a worldwide phenomenon as Muhammad Ali. The man who bragged about his ability to "float like a butterfly and sting like a bee" went from being a curious oddity in the early 1960s to a national villain to an international hero. And now he reigns as one of the most beloved men on the planet.



He was born on Jan. 18, 1942, in Louisville, Kentucky. Clay, who started fighting at the age of 12, won two national Golden Gloves middleweight championship and an AAU national light-heavyweight title. Soon after graduating Central High School as a D student, 376th in a class of 391, Clay showed he was an A student in the ring when he won the light-heavyweight gold medal at the 1960 Olympics in Rome.



In his early pro bouts, Clay showed unbelievable hand and foot speed for someone 6-foot-3 and about 190 pounds. As he developed, he displayed a stinging jab and an improving right. With his hands held low, he avoided punches to the head by bobbing out of the way.



The brash youngster was a terrific self-promoter, mugging for the camera and boasting that not only was he the greatest fighter, he also was the prettiest. He predicted in rhyme, with unerring accuracy, the round in which he would knock out his opponent ("They all fall/in the round I call"). In a period when interest in boxing had waned, Clay revitalized the sport.


While he had brought life to the sport, the boxing press was not convinced he was ready to dethrone heavyweight champ Sonny Liston. Before their Feb. 25, 1964 fight in Miami Beach, 43 of 46 writers predicted a Liston victory. A 7-1 underdog, Clay scored a stunning upset when Liston didn't come out for the seventh round, claiming a shoulder injury.


The next morning he confirmed he had joined the Nation of Islam. On March 6, the sect's leader, Elijah Muhammad, gave a radio address in which he declared the name Cassius Clay lacked a "divine meaning." He gave him the Muslim name "Muhammad Ali." Muhammad meant one worthy of praise and Ali was the name of a cousin of the prophet. The popular opinion was that the heavyweight champ shouldn't be preaching what was considered a "hate religion." Ali's popularity nose-dived.



Promoters shied away from his rematch with Liston, and it was held in front of only 2,434 fans at the Central Maine Youth Center in Lewiston on May 25, 1965. Liston never made it past the first round, Ali scoring a knockout with what some claim was a "phantom punch." Six months later, Ali unmercifully punished former champ Floyd Patterson before the fight was stopped in the 12th round.





Muhammad Ali became "The Greatest of All-Time."Ali successfully defended his title seven more times through March 22, 1967. But his TKO of Zora Folley was his last fight in the ring for 3 years. Now, Ali's opponent was Uncle Sam. When the military attempted to draft him, Ali said he was a conscientious objector. "I ain't got no quarrel with them Viet Cong," he had said in 1966.



Appearing for his scheduled induction on April 28, 1967 in Houston, he refused three times to step forward at the call of his name. An officer warned him he was committing a felony punishable by five years in prison and a fine of $10,000. Once more Ali refused to budge when his name was called.



That day, the New York State Athletic Commission suspended his boxing license and stripped him of his title. Other boxing commissions followed suit.



At the trial two months later, the jury, after only 21 minutes of deliberation, found Ali guilty. The judge imposed the maximum sentence. After a court of appeals upheld the conviction, the case went to the U.S. Supreme Court. During this time, the country turned against the war, and support grew for Ali.



Eight months before the Supreme Court ruled, Ali returned to the ring. There was no state commission in Georgia, and on Oct. 26, 1970, Ali scored a third-round TKO over Jerry Quarry in Atlanta. Six weeks later, he registered a 15th-round TKO over Oscar Bonavena in New York.



Two undefeated heavyweights stepped into the ring in Madison Square Garden on March 8, 1971 in what was billed as "The Fight of the Century." Joe Frazier and Ali each received then-record purses of $2.5 million. Remarkably, the fight lived up to the hype.



The two punched at a furious pace, with Frazier applying unrelenting pressure, and Ali answering with rapid combinations. A sweeping left hook by Frazier decked Ali in the 15th round. While Frazier left with a battered face, he also exited with the unanimous decision and his title.



Ali, though, took a bigger decision three months later when the Supreme Court ruled in his favor.



After winning 10 fights, Ali dropped a 12-round decision to Ken Norton, who broke his jaw in the second round. Ali reversed that decision later in 1973.



The second Ali-Frazier fight, on Jan. 28, 1974, didn't live up to the standards set by the first competition, but it still was an interesting encounter. Ali gained a unanimous decision, setting up a match with George Foreman, who had knocked out Frazier for the title.



"You think the world was shocked when Nixon resigned?" Ali said. "Wait till I whup George Foreman's behind."



The Rumble in the Jungle was fought in the pre-dawn hours of Oct. 30, 1974, in Kinshasa, Zaire. Ali, a 7-1 underdog, introduced the Rope-a-Dope, where he stood flatfooted against the ropes and covered up as Foreman flailed away. By the eighth round, the unbeaten champion was exhausted, and Ali knocked him out. He had become the second heavyweight (Patterson was the first) to regain the title.



Ali had become America's champion. The most vilified athlete of the sixties had become the most heroic of the seventies. A man denounced as anti-America in 1967 was invited to the White House in 1974.



Eleven months after whupping Foreman came the Thrilla in Manila, on Oct. 1, 1975. Ali took the early rounds before Frazier hammered away in the middle rounds. But Ali showed the heart of the champion in the late rounds. He staggered Frazier in the 13th and, with the challenger's eye swollen shut, pummeled him in the 14th. When the bell rang for Round 15, Eddie Futch, Frazier's trainer, threw in the towel.



An overconfident Ali lost his title on Feb. 15, 1978, when Leon ****es, a 1976 Olympic gold medalist who had only seven fights as a pro, took a split decision. Ali regained the title from Spinks seven months later, winning a unanimous decision. He had become the first three-time heavyweight champion. It would be his last victory.





Ali was the first three-time heavyweight champion.The following June, Ali announced his retirement. But money brought him back and Larry Holmes and Trevor Berbick beat him in his last two fights. Ali, with a 56-5 record, retired for good in 1981.



Unfortunately, all the punches he suffered had taken an effect. In 1984, he learned he had Parkinson's disease, a neurological syndrome characterized by tremors, rigidity of muscles and slowness of speech and movement. While the disease has left him a shadow of his former self, he still attempts to spread goodwill. Only now he does it with smiling eyes rather than his Louisville Lip.



At the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Ali again stood alone in the spotlight. With the world watching, his hands trembling, he steadied them to light the flaming cauldron to signal the start of the Games. Tears were shed by many as the man whose beliefs had once divided a nation was now a unifying - and beloved - force.

Hope you enjoyed them! :boxing:

Oasis_Lad
02-09-2006, 03:04 PM
He is simply...the greatest

By Larry Schwartz
Special to ESPN.com


"If you had told somebody in 1968 that in 1996 Muhammad Ali would be the most beloved individual on earth, and the mere sight of him holding an Olympic torch would bring people to tears, you'd have won a lot of bets," says Bryant Gumbel on ESPN Classic's SportsCentury series.



He boasted he was "The Greatest," and in the prime of his charismatic career, many agreed. But as brilliant as Muhammad Ali was in the ring, perhaps his true greatness was outside it, when he fought the United States government. His refusal to accept induction into the armed forces on religious grounds cost him millions and his heavyweight title, but, in the end, Ali came up victorious in the most significant battle of his life.

Vince Lombardi took a look at Ali's speed and power and thought one thing: "linebacker."

Sports is filled with showmen, and with great athletes, but perhaps never were they better combined than in the young man who began life as Cassius Clay and became a worldwide phenomenon as Muhammad Ali. The man who bragged about his ability to "float like a butterfly and sting like a bee" went from being a curious oddity in the early 1960s to a national villain to an international hero. And now he reigns as one of the most beloved men on the planet.



He was born on Jan. 18, 1942, in Louisville, Kentucky. Clay, who started fighting at the age of 12, won two national Golden Gloves middleweight championship and an AAU national light-heavyweight title. Soon after graduating Central High School as a D student, 376th in a class of 391, Clay showed he was an A student in the ring when he won the light-heavyweight gold medal at the 1960 Olympics in Rome.



In his early pro bouts, Clay showed unbelievable hand and foot speed for someone 6-foot-3 and about 190 pounds. As he developed, he displayed a stinging jab and an improving right. With his hands held low, he avoided punches to the head by bobbing out of the way.



The brash youngster was a terrific self-promoter, mugging for the camera and boasting that not only was he the greatest fighter, he also was the prettiest. He predicted in rhyme, with unerring accuracy, the round in which he would knock out his opponent ("They all fall/in the round I call"). In a period when interest in boxing had waned, Clay revitalized the sport.


While he had brought life to the sport, the boxing press was not convinced he was ready to dethrone heavyweight champ Sonny Liston. Before their Feb. 25, 1964 fight in Miami Beach, 43 of 46 writers predicted a Liston victory. A 7-1 underdog, Clay scored a stunning upset when Liston didn't come out for the seventh round, claiming a shoulder injury.


The next morning he confirmed he had joined the Nation of Islam. On March 6, the sect's leader, Elijah Muhammad, gave a radio address in which he declared the name Cassius Clay lacked a "divine meaning." He gave him the Muslim name "Muhammad Ali." Muhammad meant one worthy of praise and Ali was the name of a cousin of the prophet. The popular opinion was that the heavyweight champ shouldn't be preaching what was considered a "hate religion." Ali's popularity nose-dived.



Promoters shied away from his rematch with Liston, and it was held in front of only 2,434 fans at the Central Maine Youth Center in Lewiston on May 25, 1965. Liston never made it past the first round, Ali scoring a knockout with what some claim was a "phantom punch." Six months later, Ali unmercifully punished former champ Floyd Patterson before the fight was stopped in the 12th round.





Muhammad Ali became "The Greatest of All-Time."Ali successfully defended his title seven more times through March 22, 1967. But his TKO of Zora Folley was his last fight in the ring for 3 years. Now, Ali's opponent was Uncle Sam. When the military attempted to draft him, Ali said he was a conscientious objector. "I ain't got no quarrel with them Viet Cong," he had said in 1966.



Appearing for his scheduled induction on April 28, 1967 in Houston, he refused three times to step forward at the call of his name. An officer warned him he was committing a felony punishable by five years in prison and a fine of $10,000. Once more Ali refused to budge when his name was called.



That day, the New York State Athletic Commission suspended his boxing license and stripped him of his title. Other boxing commissions followed suit.



At the trial two months later, the jury, after only 21 minutes of deliberation, found Ali guilty. The judge imposed the maximum sentence. After a court of appeals upheld the conviction, the case went to the U.S. Supreme Court. During this time, the country turned against the war, and support grew for Ali.



Eight months before the Supreme Court ruled, Ali returned to the ring. There was no state commission in Georgia, and on Oct. 26, 1970, Ali scored a third-round TKO over Jerry Quarry in Atlanta. Six weeks later, he registered a 15th-round TKO over Oscar Bonavena in New York.



Two undefeated heavyweights stepped into the ring in Madison Square Garden on March 8, 1971 in what was billed as "The Fight of the Century." Joe Frazier and Ali each received then-record purses of $2.5 million. Remarkably, the fight lived up to the hype.



The two punched at a furious pace, with Frazier applying unrelenting pressure, and Ali answering with rapid combinations. A sweeping left hook by Frazier decked Ali in the 15th round. While Frazier left with a battered face, he also exited with the unanimous decision and his title.



Ali, though, took a bigger decision three months later when the Supreme Court ruled in his favor.



After winning 10 fights, Ali dropped a 12-round decision to Ken Norton, who broke his jaw in the second round. Ali reversed that decision later in 1973.



The second Ali-Frazier fight, on Jan. 28, 1974, didn't live up to the standards set by the first competition, but it still was an interesting encounter. Ali gained a unanimous decision, setting up a match with George Foreman, who had knocked out Frazier for the title.



"You think the world was shocked when Nixon resigned?" Ali said. "Wait till I whup George Foreman's behind."



The Rumble in the Jungle was fought in the pre-dawn hours of Oct. 30, 1974, in Kinshasa, Zaire. Ali, a 7-1 underdog, introduced the Rope-a-Dope, where he stood flatfooted against the ropes and covered up as Foreman flailed away. By the eighth round, the unbeaten champion was exhausted, and Ali knocked him out. He had become the second heavyweight (Patterson was the first) to regain the title.



Ali had become America's champion. The most vilified athlete of the sixties had become the most heroic of the seventies. A man denounced as anti-America in 1967 was invited to the White House in 1974.



Eleven months after whupping Foreman came the Thrilla in Manila, on Oct. 1, 1975. Ali took the early rounds before Frazier hammered away in the middle rounds. But Ali showed the heart of the champion in the late rounds. He staggered Frazier in the 13th and, with the challenger's eye swollen shut, pummeled him in the 14th. When the bell rang for Round 15, Eddie Futch, Frazier's trainer, threw in the towel.



An overconfident Ali lost his title on Feb. 15, 1978, when Leon ****es, a 1976 Olympic gold medalist who had only seven fights as a pro, took a split decision. Ali regained the title from Spinks seven months later, winning a unanimous decision. He had become the first three-time heavyweight champion. It would be his last victory.





Ali was the first three-time heavyweight champion.The following June, Ali announced his retirement. But money brought him back and Larry Holmes and Trevor Berbick beat him in his last two fights. Ali, with a 56-5 record, retired for good in 1981.



Unfortunately, all the punches he suffered had taken an effect. In 1984, he learned he had Parkinson's disease, a neurological syndrome characterized by tremors, rigidity of muscles and slowness of speech and movement. While the disease has left him a shadow of his former self, he still attempts to spread goodwill. Only now he does it with smiling eyes rather than his Louisville Lip.



At the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Ali again stood alone in the spotlight. With the world watching, his hands trembling, he steadied them to light the flaming cauldron to signal the start of the Games. Tears were shed by many as the man whose beliefs had once divided a nation was now a unifying - and beloved - force.

Hope you enjoyed them! :boxing:


great article man

Dempsey 1919
02-09-2006, 03:15 PM
great article man

thanks, alot.

http://www.popartuk.com/g/l/lgfl0321.jpg

http://www.africanamericans.com/images2/muhammad_ali.jpg

http://www.limelightagency.com/wood/Image/450/muhammad_Ali.jpg

El Guapo
02-09-2006, 03:42 PM
yea ali is my favourite of those three just because of his importance to boxing

i also like joe louis
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/aaworld/reference/images/joe_louis.jpg

Dempsey 1919
02-09-2006, 03:57 PM
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/vKDIbZ3zrzc"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/vKDIbZ3zrzc" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

Dempsey 1919
02-09-2006, 04:02 PM
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Zn-eshJqUl4"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Zn-eshJqUl4" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

Dempsey 1919
02-09-2006, 05:47 PM
"All I want now is to be a nice, clean gentleman. I've proved my point. Now I'm going to set an example for all the nice boys and girls. I'm through talking."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/39864000/jpg/_39864423_02602_su_goat_02.jpg

RockyMarcianofan00
02-09-2006, 05:53 PM
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/78ZcVyCbSRw"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/78ZcVyCbSRw" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

this made me laugh cause ali could probably still beat bush

ali's the last person on the video
________
Infants Prilosec (http://www.classactionsettlements.org/lawsuit/prilosec/)

Dempsey 1919
02-09-2006, 05:56 PM
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/78ZcVyCbSRw"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/78ZcVyCbSRw" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

this made me laugh cause ali could probably still beat bush

ali's the last person on the video

yeah, that is hillarious!

Dempsey 1919
02-10-2006, 03:39 PM
Fifteen referees. I want fifteen referees to be at this fight because there ain't no one man who can keep up with the pace I'm gonna set except me. There's not a man alive who can whup me. I'm too fast. I'm too smart. I'm too pretty. I should be a postage stamp. That's the only way I'll ever get licked.

<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/ZUKaOFnqx9k"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/ZUKaOFnqx9k" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

Dempsey 1919
02-10-2006, 04:20 PM
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/uv8CJdWO2Lo"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/uv8CJdWO2Lo" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

Dempsey 1919
02-10-2006, 05:23 PM
no one likes this thread anymore?

Oasis_Lad
02-10-2006, 05:27 PM
no one likes this thread anymore?

i love it just dont feel i could contribute anything as good as u do so i dont try

Kid Achilles
02-10-2006, 06:05 PM
How do you post videos?

Oasis_Lad
02-10-2006, 06:08 PM
How do you post videos?

upload your videos from your hard drive
to an uploading site like
putfile or you tube

Oasis_Lad
02-10-2006, 06:24 PM
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c13/oasis_lad/dcc7c037.jpg

"there's never been a boxer better than joe louis. you'd take one
shot from him and you were sure he'd have seven or eight more
coming for you. certainly muhammad ali was the greatest man to ever
fight,but not the greates boxer."
--George foreman

Dempsey 1919
02-11-2006, 03:09 PM
Who were those little ******s? :D

http://www.blacksatincollectibles.com/ali-beatles.jpg

Oasis_Lad
02-11-2006, 03:14 PM
:D

http://www.blacksatincollectibles.com/ali-beatles.jpg

ha ha i love the beatles did he really say that?

Dempsey 1919
02-11-2006, 03:25 PM
ha ha i love the beatles did he really say that?

yeah, he did.

LondonRingRules
02-11-2006, 03:30 PM
Good clips kid. That first clip looks like it has some 61-62 fights on it. Couldn't recognize those guys.

Mike Tyson77
02-12-2006, 11:40 AM
http://coxscorner.tripod.com/Images/johnson_jeff.jpg


I love these Jack Johnson pics, he's one of my all time favorite fighters.

Dempsey 1919
02-13-2006, 12:42 AM
I love these Jack Johnson pics, he's one of my all time favorite fighters.

he's my second favorite.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-13-2006, 01:10 AM
he's my second favorite.
let me guess Ali's your first :rolleyes:
lol i'm just messing with you

if you want me to let you in on a secret Marciano's my favorite fighter
________
Babydolly18 (http://camslivesexy.com/cam/Babydolly18)

Southpaw Stinger
02-13-2006, 12:21 PM
let me guess Ali's your first
lol i'm just messing with you

if you want me to let you in on a secret Marciano's my favorite fighter

Really? Thats really surprised me! I thought Chuck Norris was your favourite. lol

RockyMarcianofan00
02-13-2006, 01:25 PM
heres the difference

Rocky Marciano is my favorite fighter

Chuck Norris is my favorite superhuman man
________
Laguna Bay II Condominium Pattaya (http://pattayaluxurycondos.com)

Southpaw Stinger
02-13-2006, 03:16 PM
lol, ok whatever. Billy Crystal would own his ass though! lol! hehe

Dempsey 1919
02-14-2006, 03:05 PM
here's the fight that made ali into a boxing legend, the rematch between him and sonny liston!

<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/AnfgtpzsFdQ"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/AnfgtpzsFdQ" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

Dempsey 1919
02-14-2006, 03:21 PM
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/YQywnwobi68"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/YQywnwobi68" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

Dempsey 1919
02-15-2006, 06:53 PM
i see this is a forgotten thread. :(

http://www.stives-town.info/citizens/boxing/photos2/images/btn95.jpg

here's a pic of ali throwing a wicked right lead to ken norton's face in the 1973 rematch. ali was in great shape for that fight, weighing 212, just as he did in his prime years, compared to 221 the last time he and norton fought.

Oasis_Lad
02-24-2006, 03:28 PM
u need to post more
u come up with the good ****

Dempsey 1919
02-24-2006, 03:31 PM
u need to post more
u come up with the good ****

post anything you want here about any black boxers.

Oasis_Lad
02-24-2006, 03:32 PM
post anything you want here about any black boxers.

ill try and find something of worth

Da Iceman
02-24-2006, 07:23 PM
DISGRACE

http://www.fortunecity.com/olympia/wagner/37/mikebite.jpg

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 03:52 PM
DISGRACE

http://www.fortunecity.com/olympia/wagner/37/mikebite.jpg

rocky "the brockton bumb" marciano. an even bigger disgrace! :D

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 05:35 PM
disgrace to what i can't see the picture

why do you hate Marciano so much?
i mean i don't say Ali was horrible every chance i get

Southpaw Stinger
02-25-2006, 05:48 PM
why do you hate Marciano so much?
i mean i don't say Ali was horrible every chance i get

Although you do say Bruce Lee could beat him in a boxing match, which is the worst insult imaginable!

lol

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 05:52 PM
Although you do say Bruce Lee could beat him in a boxing match, which is the worst insult imaginable!

lol

did i say lee would beat him in a boxing match? no, i said a streetfight.

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 05:55 PM
disgrace to what i can't see the picture

why do you hate Marciano so much?
i mean i don't say Ali was horrible every chance i get

because he's overrated. nothing special about beating up on old washed up middleweights while almost getting ko'd by them with one punch. nothing special about having to get a gift win over bums like lastarza. nothing special about retiring early cause you know you would lose to the rising stars coming up, aka floyd patterson and sonny liston. nothing special about that at all!

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 06:00 PM
hang on before we go off in some other direction would somebody tell me what that picture under the word disgrace was

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 06:02 PM
because he's overrated. nothing special about beating up on old washed up middleweights while almost getting ko'd by them with one punch. nothing special about having to get a gift win over bums like lastarza. nothing special about retiring early cause you know you would lose to the rising stars coming up, aka floyd patterson and sonny liston. nothing special about that at all!
he wasn't afraid of niether of those guys, he was willing to fight Clay but clay at the time was to young or wasn't ranked high enough, he wanted to fight liston but by the time he was Liston was ranked high enough Rocky knew he was too old and out of shape, Rocky would lay lison out, only thing liston had over him was same thing most have over him, height,speed,footwork

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 06:05 PM
he wasn't afraid of niether of those guys, he was willing to fight Clay but clay at the time was to young or wasn't ranked high enough, he wanted to fight liston but by the time he was Liston was ranked high enough Rocky knew he was too old and out of shape, Rocky would lay lison out, only thing liston had over him was same thing most have over him, height,speed,footwork

well, you already said that rocky would beat foreman, so enough said.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 06:13 PM
no i said he had a chance, which isn't bad to say considering any fighter has a chance at beating anybody, i mean archie moore could have beaten Ali had ali sprained his ankle or something

but seriously if Rocky could last past the 4th round with his head on he could beat Foreman

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 06:14 PM
no i said he had a chance, which isn't bad to say considering any fighter has a chance at beating anybody, i mean archie moore could have beaten Ali had ali sprained his ankle or something

but seriously if Rocky could last past the 4th round with his head on he could beat Foreman

but my point is that marciano wouldn't get past the fourth round.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 06:15 PM
Marciano knew he would lose to Liston if he had come out of retirement at 240lbs and strength zapped

he didn't want to give liston the priviledge of having the name Marciano on lison's record as Louis had for Marciano, and later, holmes would have with ali, and Tyson would have with Holmes

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 06:16 PM
but my point is that marciano wouldn't get past the fourth round.
you can't just write it off he's got a decent shot
Foreman ain't some sort of god

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 06:17 PM
you can't just write it off he's got a decent shot
Foreman ain't some sort of god

but marciano wouldn't be the guy to take foreman to the later rounds anyway.

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 06:17 PM
Marciano knew he would lose to Liston if he had come out of retirement at 240lbs and strength zapped

he didn't want to give liston the priviledge of having the name Marciano on lison's record as Louis had for Marciano, and later, holmes would have with ali, and Tyson would have with Holmes

i strongly doubt even prime marciano would beat liston.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 06:19 PM
you can't say that Marciano was wierd his stradgies always were switched up, because if you stay with one stradgy then you get predictable, ie Ali v Foreman, Ali knew foreman would try to destroy him in the first round so he made his stradgy into something that would counter that

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 06:21 PM
you can't say that Marciano was wierd his stradgies always were switched up, because if you stay with one stradgy then you get predictable, ie Ali v Foreman, Ali knew foreman would try to destroy him in the first round so he made his stradgy into something that would counter that

it doesn't matter cause foreman is way too powerful for marciano's chin.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 06:22 PM
it doesn't matter cause foreman is way too powerful for marciano's chin.
not really

Prime Marciano is very very very underrated

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 06:24 PM
not really

Prime Marciano is very very very overrated.

this is true. :D

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 06:25 PM
*sarcasm*
but whatever makes you happy

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 06:28 PM
*sarcasm*
but whatever makes you happy

liston is basically a 1960s version of foreman, so it would be similar to what foreman would do to marciano IMO.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-25-2006, 06:34 PM
no i think Marciano would have way harder time with foreman then liston

IMO he'd ko liston mid rounds but marciano would be down once/twice in the fight

Dempsey 1919
02-25-2006, 06:36 PM
no i think Marciano would have way harder time with foreman then liston

i think so too, cause of the difference in power.

Da Iceman
02-25-2006, 08:50 PM
its a picture of tyson biting holyfields ear. how was he scared of patterson if patterson wasnt even ranked when he was champion. he was still at light heavy. learn your facts *****. and like rockymarcianofan said of course he would lose to liston if he came out of retirment fat as hell and even slower with less power.

Dempsey 1919
02-26-2006, 12:12 AM
its a picture of tyson biting holyfields ear. how was he scared of patterson if patterson wasnt even ranked when he was champion. he was still at light heavy. learn your facts *****. and like rockymarcianofan said of course he would lose to liston if he came out of retirment fat as hell and even slower with less power.

in your little minds marciano crushed god in one round, so enough said.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-26-2006, 02:09 AM
in your little minds marciano crushed god in one round, so enough said.
not really but in ur mind Ali would never lose in his prime

Oasis_Lad
02-26-2006, 02:13 AM
not really but in ur mind Ali would never lose in his prime

the chances of ali losing in his prime are very slim

LondonRingRules
02-26-2006, 05:19 PM
the chances of ali losing in his prime are very slim
** Depends on what you consider prime. Ali lost to Frazier at age 29, traditionally a good age for big heavies, which Ali was. He regained the title twice more with more title defenses than the first go round.

Southpaw Stinger
02-26-2006, 06:18 PM
Depends on what you consider prime. Ali lost to Frazier at age 29, traditionally a good age for big heavies, which Ali was. He regained the title twice more with more title defenses than the first go round.

Trouble is that Ali had just returned from a 3 and a half year lay off from boxing. And age doesn't favor Ali's dancing style as long as other fight styles.

RockyMarcianofan00
02-26-2006, 09:20 PM
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c49/IrishInsomniac00/Poster-Joe-Louis.jpg

Dempsey 1919
02-15-2007, 01:54 AM
Bump......

Southpaw Stinger
02-15-2007, 08:27 AM
I still think it's quite patronising to have a black history month!

Dempsey 1919
02-17-2007, 05:41 PM
I still think it's quite patronising to have a black history month!

Well, in America it's kind of deserved.

brownpimp88
02-17-2007, 06:47 PM
I want to see a larry holmes bio, he's the best ever.

K-DOGG
02-18-2007, 11:41 AM
Pt 2 of "Unforgiveable Blackness" is coming on PBS tonight for those of you wanting to watch a great documentary on Jack Johnson.

Mike Tyson77
02-18-2007, 02:09 PM
If you havent see Unforgiveable Blackness, you should watch it. Jack Johnson is one of the greatest P4P. He's one of my favorite fighters of all time. If I could meet one fighter that isnt alive today, it would be Jack Johnson. It would have been awesome to see him fight Jeffries. I would have been at ringside screamin, whoop him Jack! And everyone would have been lookin at me sayin, That white dude must have lost his mind! LOL!

K-DOGG
02-18-2007, 03:18 PM
It's not so much Johnson's boisterous behavior that does it for me; but the fact that the man was genuinely VERY intelligent and he was his own man, he did what Jack Johnson wanted to do and he was ballsy enough to speak his mind and rub the double-standard of the time in people's faces. It's a small miracle he wasn't killed for doing the things he did at the time. And I'll say this much and many on here will disagree with me.....he could have beaten many of the modern fighters; he'd just have to be more active today because he wouldn't have 20 rounds or more to make a game plan work.

I rank him the #4 all-time heavyweight.

Mike Tyson77
02-18-2007, 05:53 PM
It's not so much Johnson's boisterous behavior that does it for me; but the fact that the man was genuinely VERY intelligent and he was his own man, he did what Jack Johnson wanted to do and he was ballsy enough to speak his mind and rub the double-standard of the time in people's faces. It's a small miracle he wasn't killed for doing the things he did at the time. And I'll say this much and many on here will disagree with me.....he could have beaten many of the modern fighters; he'd just have to be more active today because he wouldn't have 20 rounds or more to make a game plan work.

I rank him the #4 all-time heavyweight.


I agree, Johnson was decades ahead of his time. I think he would be the undisputed champ if he boxed today.

K-DOGG
02-19-2007, 08:34 PM
Heads Up!!

I was wrong. It wasn't last night....It's TONIGHT!!....I think. My wife saw the advertisement and told me. I hope she's right.



Check your local listings!!

SABBATH
02-20-2007, 12:31 AM
Heads Up!!

I was wrong. It wasn't last night....It's TONIGHT!!....I think. My wife saw the advertisement and told me. I hope she's right.



Check your local listings!!God bless your wife for telling you. My wife doesn't tell me, makes me sit through another re-run episode of King of Queens and then tells me the next day, "oh by the way, there was a boxing special on last night. I forgot to tell you."

K-DOGG
02-20-2007, 12:34 AM
God bless your wife for telling you. My wife doesn't tell me, makes me sit through another re-run episode of King of Queens and then tells me the next day, "oh by the way, there was a boxing special on last night. I forgot to tell you."


lol!!! Give her time. We're newly-weds. :lol1:


....and, she was wrong. :dunno: Oh well, at least she tried. :)