View Full Version : Training for power


Fistecles
01-09-2005, 10:30 AM
Alright guys, lets talk power. If there is one thing I know it's power. At 165lbs I was squating 345lbs and deadlifting 355lbs for 7 reps, no straps on my hands. Straps are for ******* by the way. So are belts. Never used either and never suffered any injury from lifting. Train don't strain.

First lets talk speed. Speed is directly related to flexibilty. The more flexable you are the less resistance you have across your muscle fibres, the faster you can extend and contract your limbs. I take 10-15min minimum to stretch. Hold your stretches for at least 30sec each, and do them twice. So its a total of 1min for each strecth.

If you are lifting weights for a sport you cant aproach it like a bodybuilder so forget pumped up muscles and the beauty of symetry. You need a plan. And I mean a year long plan. So start taking notes and ask question if anything is unclear.

Muscular contraction is a chemical reaction. This chemical reaction becomes engraved into your muscle memory through training. So how you train will dictate what your muscles will be able to do in the way of what kind of effort they can exert.

If you move slow you train your muscles to be slow. So lifting heavey and I mean over 80% of your 1rep max will make you muscles move slow. But you still need to lift in this rep range to build solid power. The idea is to take a period of time building your power, then taper off on weight. Between 70-80% of your one rep max will help you build your speed. Below 70% is endurance. Which is important in boxing, but I find that speed bag and other boxing specific exercises are better for endurance.


EXERCISES:Don'ts
Dont waste your time in the gym doing garbage movements. Exercises like dumbell kickbacks are for are for clowns and bodybuilders. There is no room in your exhausting boxing train for time consuming exercises like those. Stay away from isolation movements. Concentration curls, preacher curls, triseps extension, flyes, both front and reverse, leg curls and extensions. These are your don'ts.

Exercises:Do's
COMPOUND MOVEMENTS PEOPLE!!!. Thats the key to success. Bench press, both barbel and dumbell. Flat or inclined, but not decline. Bent over rows barbell/dumbell, t-bar row, Wide grip chinups, regular chins and pull-ups, dumbell/barbell shrugs. Squats deadlifts, Powercleans, highpulls. These are really the only exercises you should concern yourself with in the way of weights.

SETS,REPS,REST
When training for absolute power-over80%- you should be doin 2-5reps 6-8 sets per exercise, with 3-5 min rest between sets. There is no need to do more then 1-2 exercises per body part. And no more then 12sets. You can't afford to head for a burn out when training with so much intensity.
The movement here will be slow, but thats o.k.. It will pay off in the next part of your training. Train like this for 3 months

Training for speed:Between 70-80% of your one rep max. Do 6-8 reps, 3-4sets of 2-3 exercises. Again you will not do more then 12sets in total. Now because of the power you gained, weight you were doing for 6-8 reps should be easier. Now that they are easier you can increase the speed of the movement. Do this for 3 months aswell.

Once your cycle is over take a break from everything, and I mean boxing aswell, from 4days to a week. Don't worry, you will not have lost a thing. If you are really into traing though, start cardio after 4 days of rest. Recovery is just as important as training.

Martin (Top Knowledge)
03-15-2005, 10:33 AM
I think some fighters just have natural power... Like Tszyu, but to get great power you need to perfect your timing.

Martin (Top Knowledge)
03-15-2005, 10:34 AM
And widen you stance... :D

jack_the_rippuh
03-15-2005, 11:33 AM
Lower weight boxers don't need to lift weights.

Echojaybird
03-15-2005, 03:23 PM
Everyone should lift weights. It develops more punching power. Lift smart by not developing hypertrophy, meaning the swelling of muscles. This will allow you not to gain weight, or very little.

If two fighters who have exactly the same skill match up, usually the stronger one wins.

Echo

jeffmills
03-15-2005, 03:27 PM
Being strong throughout your whole body and having high levels of overall fitness and cardio will aid your punching power, but nothing beats having great punching technique.

puppy_dogg
03-15-2005, 03:37 PM
Everyone should lift weights. It develops more punching power. Lift smart by not developing hypertrophy, meaning the swelling of muscles. This will allow you not to gain weight, or very little.

If two fighters who have exactly the same skill match up, usually the stronger one wins.

Echo

i would think the faster one would win. go for speed, speed kills

like roy said.....strength dont mean **** if you cant put it on the target

Echojaybird
03-15-2005, 03:42 PM
When you lift, lift explosively. The whole "weight training will make your punches slower" thing is a myth. Studies have shown that lifting weights can actually develop more speed and explosive power and also make the muscles more flexible. And as stated above, technique is also key.

Echo

mickst3r
03-15-2005, 11:27 PM
When training for explosiveness you could go as low as 50% of ur max.. as long as the movements are done explosively.

Also, the best thing for speed/power is plyometrics. Plyometrics are explosive movements such as a jump squat or a medicine ball pass.

kapersky
03-16-2005, 12:09 AM
Lower weight boxers don't need to lift weights.

i think so too, when chavez vs taylor he didnt looks "big" no musles in his arm at all, but he almost kill taylor. how do evander holyfield train?, i mean his arms is much bigger than his legs, how did he do that?.

buff_mike10
03-16-2005, 12:17 AM
Mike Tyson never lifted weights until he was in prison. Cus had him doing plyometrics all the time. Then there's Holyfeild who lifted weights all the time. I'd say weight lifting is good to get to a certain size, getting to big just slows you down.

kapersky
03-16-2005, 12:39 AM
Mike Tyson never lifted weights until he was in prison. Cus had him doing plyometrics all the time. Then there's Holyfeild who lifted weights all the time. I'd say weight lifting is good to get to a certain size, getting to big just slows you down.

tyson didnt?, why did he got so much muscles on his arms in his prime then?. if he did lifted weights after was in prison that explain why he was so slow. he lifted to much i guess. i knew holyfield lifted weights that was obviosly when you look at his body. i agree with you its good to get to a certain size, holyfield was a light heavyweight he did need to go up a little bit. but how did he train so his arms looks much bigger than his legs?.

Cre_Ace
03-16-2005, 12:46 PM
You gotta learn how to hit with perfect timing. Ask BRUCE Lee.

Cre_Ace
03-16-2005, 12:51 PM
I don't think lifting weights give you power, and for me there are 2 differnt things, power and strengh. Like trinidad, I don't think he be lifting weights, Vargas on the other hand looks like he does. And ya know what happen'd there. I think some of the guys in here that weight 160 bench press more than me, but that doesn't mean they've more power. I have a friend who's a cop and he weights 155 and he could beat me in arm wrestling, but when we went to Coney Island, you ever seen one of those things where it has a speed bag and you punch it and it tells you how much power you have? Well he punched it and he score like 500 and when I hit it I had like 900. And I can't beat him in arm wrestling. go figure.

.::|ULTIMATE|::.
03-16-2005, 01:02 PM
Power primarily comes from speed and the technique that you use to deliver your punches.

Tha Greatest
03-16-2005, 01:55 PM
weights do help in power if used correctly
but bunching dont show how hard u punch
ur muscles used to punch dont come from bench press actually
u dont need chest to punch hard, it's mostly from ur body not ur arms, only shoulders


haha i got small ass ppl that can KILL me in arm wrestling
but i punch 1000 times harder than them

mickst3r
03-16-2005, 09:37 PM
punching power comes from both strength and speed... to be "powerful" does not necesarrily mean to be "stong" in the sense of being able to bench 300 #'s... in something like punching, the amoutn of force you able to produce in that split second is much more important than the amount of force you could produce over time... hence why plyometrics is so important for power.. you teach your muscles to produce a lot of force in a short amount of time. this does not mean that strength is not a factor as well... if you incorparte heavy lifting with plyometrics, you'll be able to produce even more strength in that short amount of time...

i could have sworn i heard holyfield did only bodyweight excersises... i may be wrong though

boxerman
03-23-2005, 12:15 AM
"i could have sworn i heard holyfield did only bodyweight excersises... i may be wrong though"

Holyfield trained with ex mr olympia, lee haney. I assume they weren't just doing pushups and situps. He also used to do alot of wierd, very specific exercises with weights. I cant remember exacty what they were but I remember seeing it on the news once. Oh and I live in Atlanta and we used to get alot of Holyfield coverage during the sports. He even got a parade once, like the falcons or braves. That was cool.

icedog11
03-23-2005, 05:19 PM
punching power comes from both strength and speed... to be "powerful" does not necesarrily mean to be "stong" in the sense of being able to bench 300 #'s... in something like punching, the amoutn of force you able to produce in that split second is much more important than the amount of force you could produce over time... hence why plyometrics is so important for power.. you teach your muscles to produce a lot of force in a short amount of time. this does not mean that strength is not a factor as well... if you incorparte heavy lifting with plyometrics, you'll be able to produce even more strength in that short amount of time...

i could have sworn i heard holyfield did only bodyweight excersises... i may be wrong though
i aree Plyo's are the ticket. you can use weights in plyo's as well. plyo's help to develope the mind muscle connection, teaching slow twitch muscles to react more like fast twitch. you can't change the amount of slow twitch or fast twitch muscle fibers your born with, but you can train to get quicker muscle response. I just dropped a post on another thread about this, try checking out Adam Archuleta freak of trainning dvd.Archuleta used mostly plyo types of exercises to build speed and power, You might be able to find more on the net by searching Jay Shroeder he was Archuletas trainer

John2226us
03-25-2005, 02:31 PM
While I think weight training can help someone in boxing if done properly, I do believe punchers are born not made. Anyone can improve their power of course. But I do think it is largely a natural thing. Such as you either have it or you dont type of a deal.

PunchDrunk
03-25-2005, 03:53 PM
While I think weight training can help someone in boxing if done properly, I do believe punchers are born not made. Anyone can improve their power of course. But I do think it is largely a natural thing. Such as you either have it or you dont type of a deal.

I agree. It has to do with your muscle fiber combination, how the slow twitch/fast twitch ratio is.

Icedog: It's not so much that you teach your slowtwitch fibers to act like fast twitch (though there is some speculation this can happen, it is highly controversial). It goes like this: You have a certain amount of muscle fibers in a given muscle. Then you have nerve cells (neurons)that tell these fibers when and how much they need to contract. The greater the stimulus from the neuron, the harder the contraction. So each neuron stimulates a certain number of muscle fibers each. One neuron and the muscle fibers it's connected to is called a Motor unit. The thing is, no one can activate all their motor units in a muscle at once. About 50 % are kept in reserve (sometimes when adreanaline sets in, in a state of shock or extreme danger you can activate a much higher number). What actually happens when you train heavy weights and plyometrics, is that you stress the muscle/nerve system, and thereby force it to activate more motor units. This is why you can get stronger without adding a lot of bulk. Neural training. :)

.::EnRiQuE::.
03-25-2005, 04:03 PM
penis push-ups always does the trick for me. gets me nice and strong

UnstoppableOne
03-31-2005, 02:19 AM
I always thought adding weight while not doing speed exercises would slow you down eventually...Anyways good post

Rockin'
03-31-2005, 03:30 AM
Power punching has little to do with lifting weights. Its all about proper execution, using your body to the max in the blow and possibly natural things that you are born with.

Some of the hardest punchers that I ever faced were skinny, lean and cut. The muscle heads, as I like to call them, never could really hurt me. The fights were usually quite easy against the muscle bound guys.........Rockin' :boxing:

Tha Greatest
03-31-2005, 04:51 PM
Weights are good if used properly
but there are TONS of stuff u can do without weights for lots of power or even better

Technique is the MOST important
Look at Thomas Hearns, he puts everything into his punches

A punch u dont see coming affects u more
(just look at when Robinson knocked out Fullmer) but in general a punch u dont see coming is 10 times more devastating

Balance is VERY important

Timing like someone mentioned is one of the most important

Accuracy is important

Speed!!

Endurance is great to, u can throw punches all night like u did in the first round

Power is great to lol (just ask George Foreman)

I think the Heavybag is one of the best tools for punching power
U can do lots of body weight excercises
Lots of variety of pushups, squats, pullups, etc...
and lots of explosive excercises(Plyometrics)
Handclap pushups, squat jumps, and medicine ball passes work GREAT!