View Full Version : Tommy burns and australian squires.


rob snell
11-12-2011, 11:54 AM
TOMMY BURNS AND AUSTRALIAN SQUIRES.
After Jeffries quit the fighting game, there were just two heavyweight ring events in which it was considered that the championship of the world was involved. The first of these was the battle between Tommy Burns and Champion Bill Squires of Australia. The other was a championship struggle beyond doubt. Reference is made to the bout in far away Australia when Burns lost his newly acquired title to Jack Johnson, and a black man for the first time in pugilistic history was hailed premier heavyweight fighter of the world.

In the Burns-Squires affair there were arguments as to whether the meeting was really entitled to be considered a fight for the championship. On the plea that Burns had beaten the best of the white heavyweights, and that Tommy was entitled to bar black men the way Jeffries had done before retiring and the further plea that Squires had proved himself the king-pin of the Australian heavies, the majority of sporting men graciously admitted that the Squires-Burns fight
should be considered a world's championship engagement.

Squires trained for the fight at Billy Shannon's in San Rafael, and Barney Reynolds supervised the Australian champion's preparation. Tommy Burns trained at Harbin Springs under the guidance of Professor Lewis.

The men met in Coffroth's Mission-Street arena on July 4, 1907. When the opening gong clanged, and Referee Jeffries motioned the men together, Burns backed around the ring and Squires followed. The Australian made a couple of lunges at the little fellow who was dancing away from him, and then tried to wedge Burns into a corner. Burns clinched, and
laughed as he leaned his chin on Squires' shoulder.

"Break," yelled Jeffries, and as they dropped their arms Burns bounded lightly to mid-ring. Squires began to crowd his man again. Burns waited until the Australian champion came within striking distance, and then sent in a right hander which sounded like the crack of a pistol. Squires went to the floor and rolled over. He was blinking as he arose, and there was a big lump on the side of his left eye.

Although unsteady and dazed, Squires lumbered after Burns, and as Tommy went into a clinch the Australian dealt the Canadian a stiff right hand body punch, and followed it with a left hander on the side of the face. It looked for a moment as though the body punch had hurt Burns, but Tommy pulled out of the clinch, and felled Squires with another snappy right hander.
Squires fell a second time, and the finish was in sight. He arose clumsily, and lurched toward Burns. Burns measured him now with a third right hander, and before Squires tumbled, gave him still another. This time Squires went down for keeps. He was too far gone to make the slightest effort at getting to his feet, and was counted out.

Burns was lifted shoulder high and carried from the ring by his friends.

McGoorty
11-14-2011, 07:56 PM
TOMMY BURNS AND AUSTRALIAN SQUIRES.
After Jeffries quit the fighting game, there were just two heavyweight ring events in which it was considered that the championship of the world was involved. The first of these was the battle between Tommy Burns and Champion Bill Squires of Australia. The other was a championship struggle beyond doubt. Reference is made to the bout in far away Australia when Burns lost his newly acquired title to Jack Johnson, and a black man for the first time in pugilistic history was hailed premier heavyweight fighter of the world.

In the Burns-Squires affair there were arguments as to whether the meeting was really entitled to be considered a fight for the championship. On the plea that Burns had beaten the best of the white heavyweights, and that Tommy was entitled to bar black men the way Jeffries had done before retiring and the further plea that Squires had proved himself the king-pin of the Australian heavies, the majority of sporting men graciously admitted that the Squires-Burns fight
should be considered a world's championship engagement.

Squires trained for the fight at Billy Shannon's in San Rafael, and Barney Reynolds supervised the Australian champion's preparation. Tommy Burns trained at Harbin Springs under the guidance of Professor Lewis.

The men met in Coffroth's Mission-Street arena on July 4, 1907. When the opening gong clanged, and Referee Jeffries motioned the men together, Burns backed around the ring and Squires followed. The Australian made a couple of lunges at the little fellow who was dancing away from him, and then tried to wedge Burns into a corner. Burns clinched, and
laughed as he leaned his chin on Squires' shoulder.

"Break," yelled Jeffries, and as they dropped their arms Burns bounded lightly to mid-ring. Squires began to crowd his man again. Burns waited until the Australian champion came within striking distance, and then sent in a right hander which sounded like the crack of a pistol. Squires went to the floor and rolled over. He was blinking as he arose, and there was a big lump on the side of his left eye.

Although unsteady and dazed, Squires lumbered after Burns, and as Tommy went into a clinch the Australian dealt the Canadian a stiff right hand body punch, and followed it with a left hander on the side of the face. It looked for a moment as though the body punch had hurt Burns, but Tommy pulled out of the clinch, and felled Squires with another snappy right hander.
Squires fell a second time, and the finish was in sight. He arose clumsily, and lurched toward Burns. Burns measured him now with a third right hander, and before Squires tumbled, gave him still another. This time Squires went down for keeps. He was too far gone to make the slightest effort at getting to his feet, and was counted out.

Burns was lifted shoulder high and carried from the ring by his friends.
excellent, I've been looking for threads like this.... nice read.

Dubblechin
11-15-2011, 07:58 PM
excellent, I've been looking for threads like this.... nice read.

I highly doubt these two were the best heavyweights on the planet at the time. Next to Jeffries, they look like his children. Neither knows how to jab. Neither understands defense. Neither can fight on the inside. They just wind up and throw roundhouse punches, which connect, because neither guy can slip a punch or move his head.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUDIXdef9rU

TBear
11-18-2011, 03:58 AM
I have a mpeg laying around of that fight if anyone wants it let me know here.

And robsnell, welcome to boxingscene. I ran into you at several forums in the past and your oldschool pieces are gold.

rob snell
11-18-2011, 04:32 AM
Hi mate and thanks a lot for that.As you know i do really love the old historical reports, many of them a real mix of sadness and absolute humour. I will try and do regular posts so keep an eye out for them.

cheers

Marchegiano
11-18-2011, 01:43 PM
Excellent! There are a few things I wanna hit on.

1 OP was excellent. I'm not sure if you wrote that or not, but it reads really easy. I like Tommy he was a game boxer. Plus there has to be a Tommy Burns for " Is you havin' fun mistah Tommy?" to be so damn pleasing. Tommy's more a symbol of course, but hell JJ would have schooled any honkie of the era. I'm glad your here. I'm a huge fan of learning, and all too much of posts are opinions being thrown around like fact.

2 Chin- Not everyone is a fan of, or even cares about, anything that can be labled skill. Some of us are fans of traits. This is an ancient argument. For a longer period of time than not backing up wasn't proof of skill, ever, it was proof of weakness. Everything is P.O.V. I like Jeffries too, but it isn't fair to Tommy to allow Jeffries to over shadow, and certainly isn't fair to the blacks of the era. Tommy burns was a sham because Jack was around, so was Sam, and a few other choice names. But like I said Tommy's more of a symbol.

3 TBear- I'd love that mpeg.

rob snell
11-19-2011, 05:49 AM
Its adapted from an article I found a long time back and I don't recall where from. I usually note the source and date but missed it out for some reason. I literally have tens of thousands of these articles stored away on hard drives an dvd,s. If you visit the site I run there are plenty available

boxingbiographies.com and I do a newsletter every couple of weeks and they are available from several sites on the net. The newest being on the cyber boxing zone where they have set up a separate forum for me to post them all.

I will post them here fairly soon - maybe later today.

TBear
11-19-2011, 06:46 AM
3 TBear- I'd love that mpeg.

Quality isn't great but remember it is a 104 years ago. Half a century before they even had tv.

Tommy Burns vs. Squires

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=175RACZY

Marchegiano
11-19-2011, 10:09 AM
Thats bloody great Rob. I love the site.

Thanks a bunch Tbear. It's neat to see still init?

McGoorty
11-19-2011, 02:09 PM
I highly doubt these two were the best heavyweights on the planet at the time. Next to Jeffries, they look like his children. Neither knows how to jab. Neither understands defense. Neither can fight on the inside. They just wind up and throw roundhouse punches, which connect, because neither guy can slip a punch or move his head.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUDIXdef9rU
Well the fact is that Johnson was the best HW at that time. Squires would have had very little formal boxing training,,,, Burns,,,, well he's barely more than a MW,,, for that reason I rate Burns as an underated champ..... of course we know what Jack did to Burns.

rob snell
11-22-2011, 03:47 AM
I have several very detailed accounts of the fight and will post them up as its well worth reading

rob snell
11-22-2011, 05:22 AM
New York Times
26 December 1908

Negro's Punishment of Champion
Burns Causes Authorities
to End Bout.

DECIDED ON POINTS
of Saturday Morning's Battle In
Australia Received Last Night
in New York.
Heavyweight Championship Fight,

SYDNEY, Saturday noon, . Dec. 26.

Jack Johnson, the big negro from Galveston, Texas is the world's champion, heavyweight pugilist. He won the title to-day in the big arena at Ruschutters Bay from Tommy Burns, the French-Canadian, who had held it since James J. Jeffries relinquished it, and after a chase of Burns that had led half way round the world.

The end came in the fourteenth round when the police, seeing: Burns tottering and unable to defend himself from the savage blows of his opponent, mercifully stopped the fight. Previously it had been arranged that if the police interfered a decision should be rendered on points, and referee Mclntosh without hesitation declared the big black man the winner, for all through the fight he had shown himself Burns's master in every style of fighting.

Burns in an interview after he had gone To his dressing room said: I did the best I could and fought hard. Johnson was too big and his reach was too great."

Johnson appeared fresh after the fight, while Burns's eyes were badly puffed and his mouth swollen to twice its normal size. The Canadian fought a game battle and showed Indomitable pluck, but he was no match for the big- black Texan. The fight was for a purse of $35,000 of which Burns received $30,000" and Johnson 5,000. The ring was a 24-foot one, and was pitched in the centre of a big arena built especially for the purpose at Rushcutters Bay. The bout was to have been for twenty rounds. The day dawned overcast and cool.

Thousands of persons from all parts of the country were attracted to the scene of the encounter, and many reached there Christmas night and slept in the open. They came by street cars, automobiles, carriages, and on horseback, and at 10 o'clock this morning, one hour before the fight was scheduled to start, every seat was occupied. The crowd was estimated at between 18,000 and 20,000 persons, and it kept perfect order throughout the fight.

Before the contestants entered the ring, " Bill " Squires, who thrice has been defeated by Burns, challenged the winner. Burns weighed in at 108 pounds and Johnson at 192. The betting was 7 to 4 on Burns at the start, but it veered after a .few rounds to 2 to 1 on Johnson. The spectators conceded that Johnson's victory was due to his physical advantages over burns, his superior knowledge of the fighting same, and his unruffled demeanor while being taunted by the champion. The stakes were paid the men while they were in the ring.

At 10:42 o'clock Johnson entered the arena accompanied by his seconds, Sam Fitzpatrick, Mullins, Unholz, Lang, and 'Bryant. Wild cheering greeted him and the big black man turned and bowed to all four sides of the ring.

Just as Johnson took his seat Burns appeared. He was smiling and the plaudits of the spectators were even more enthusiastic than those accorded Johnson. Burns took up his position in the western corner of the ring surrounded by his seconds, Keating, O'Keefe, O'Donnell, Burke, and Russell. When the cheering had died down somewhat Johnson crossed over and shook Burns by the hand. The Canadian glanced at the big hands of the Texan and noticed that both were covered with bandages. Fearful that perhaps they might not be of the soft kind, he scrutinized them closely, but finding them to his satisfaction he made no objection. The announcement was made that if during the contest the police should interfere and stop it the referee would immediately give a decision based on points scored.

When Burns stripped it was noticed that he wore elastic bandages about his elbows. Johnson shouted across the ring half angrily: " You must take those off." Then the men met in 'the centre of the and for a few minutes argued the question. Then they retired again to their corners, but Burns did not remove the bandages.

From Johnson's seconds came the announcement' that their man refused to fight unless Burns took off the wraps around his elbows, and it looked as though there was a possibility of the fight not taking place, for Burns was stubborn and Johnson insistent on his point. The referee, however, here took a hand in the controversy and said that the wearing of bandages was not against the rules. Johnson still demurred, nevertheless, and Burns, with a show of Impatience, had his seconds unwind the tape. His action brought forth from the spectators a tremendous round of applause.

At 11:15 o'clock Johnson and. Burns posed for a moving picture machine, and, having received final instructions from Referee Mclntosh, retired to their corners. Then the battle began.

rob snell
11-22-2011, 05:23 AM
Fight by Rounds.

FIRST ROUND

After a few moments of preliminary sparring Johnson reached Burns with a sharp uppercut, and the Canadian went to the floor, remaining there for the count or eight. He signaled to his seconds that he was all right, however, and when he arose sailed In for Johnson's body. Johnson swung a hard right to the head, and Burns staggered backward nearly across the ring from the Impact of the blow. Then Burns, rushing in, planted a right of great force on Johnson s chin, and by an excellent display of boxing warded off a return. Johnson, nevertheless, managed to put through a stinging left to the head at the sound of the gong.

SECOND ROUND

When the gone clanged Johnson yelled across to the approaching Burns, " Come right on," and he swung his right and landed hard on Burns chin. The champions ankle gave way under him and he went down. He was up immediately, however, and Johnson got to close quarters with him and placed right and left to face and body. Burns's left eye here commenced to swell. Johnson thus far had the better o the battle. The big black man was coming all the time, and he swung a terrific left Into Burns's stomach. Burns was doing but little. He. was bleeding from the mouth, and apparently was tired. The men were clinched as the bell rang.

THIRD ROUND

Burns swung his right to Johnson's head and then did some wonderful execution at in-fighting, chopping his right to the ribs frequently. Johnson during the round landed some terrific blows to the kidneys.

FOURTH ROUND

the men met In the centre of the ring Johnson shot a heavy right into Burns ribs. The men talked wildly to one another, each seemingly intent upon getting the other excited and landing the money winning punch. During the jeering they sparred fiercely, but few blows being struck. Then Johnson swung left, to the body, and Burns brought right to head. Johnson, closing in, threw a terrific right and left to the head of the , Canadian. The bell found the men In a hard clinch.

FIFTH ROUND

Apparently refreshed from his minute's rest, Burns started the round briskly, landing his right on Johnson's head and punching the body with both hands. Johnson managed to slip over a few rights to the head during the round.

SIXTH ROUND

Johnson rushed, .and Burns clinched. Breaking loose, however, with one hand -Johnson swung his right a dozen times into the white man's ribs. Burns jolted Johnson's body frequently, and swung his right hard over the ribs and put a stiff left to the stomach several, times. Johnson, however, treated these blows as a joke, laughing at the crowd and making sarcastic remarks to his opponent as he bustled Burns Into a corner and scored a couple of rights to the body.

SEVENTH ROUND

Johnson rushed Burns across the ring, dealing out rights in which there was no mercy. Burns got a left to Johnson's jaw, and Johnson raised a lump under Burns's right eye in return. Burns here seemed to be losing strength. Johnson was landing repeatedly on Burns eye, meanwhile addressing the people about the ringside, end though Tommy was working dexterously at infighting, he placed several terrific blows on Burns's ribs, dropping him to the floor for a few seconds.

EIGHTH ROUND

Burns's eyes were puffed up and he was bleeding from the mouth when he emerged from his corner. The white man's blows apparently had little effect on the Texan, who went severely about belaboring the head of the champion.

NINTH ROUND

" Come on, Tommy; swing your right! " yelled Johnson as the gong rang. Burns responded by calling the negro a " yellow dog." There was not very much fighting probably more talking during this round.

TENTH ROUND

Both men seemed tiring. Johnson still used his fists effectively on Burns's head and stomach and Burns was doing all he could ill reply. His blows, however, lacked steam.

ELEVENTH ROUND

The perspiration pouring off the body of Johnson made it look not unlike highly polished walnut. Burns tried to cross his right over, but .Johnson cleverly avoided him, meantime laughing at the champion Burns was outclassed, and Johnson apparently was invulnerable. When the bell rang Burns limped to his corner,

TWELFTH ROUND

Again Johnson sailed In, and Burns took a tremendous lot of punishment gamely. His Jaw was greatly swollen,

'THIRTEENTH ROUND

Johnson continued to play for the injured eye and the bleeding mouth of Burns, which was swollen twice its normal size. Blow after blow the colored man rained upon him. and the gong alone saved the white man from defeat, for he was reeling and groggy as it rang.

During the Intermission between the thirteenth and fourteenth rounds the police officials consulted together, and the probability is that they will stop the fight in the next round. Referee Mclntosh went to Burns's corner and had a talk with the champion, who declared that he was strong. Mclntosh then asked the police not to interfere.

FOURTEENTH ROUND

Johnson went right after Burns when time was called. The white man warily backed away, but Johnson, following him up, dropped Burns with a heavy right to the head. "One, two, three," slowly counted the referee, and Burns remained down until eight seconds had been tolled off. When he arose Johnson flew at him like a tiger, and, using both hands unmercifully, he soon had the champion tottering. The police then Jumped into the ring and stopped the fight.

The referee immediately declared Johnson the winner. He added that he considered it the best fight he ever had witnessed In Australia, and that both men had fought fairly.

McGoorty
11-29-2011, 02:49 PM
Excellent! There are a few things I wanna hit on.

1 OP was excellent. I'm not sure if you wrote that or not, but it reads really easy. I like Tommy he was a game boxer. Plus there has to be a Tommy Burns for " Is you havin' fun mistah Tommy?" to be so damn pleasing. Tommy's more a symbol of course, but hell JJ would have schooled any honkie of the era. I'm glad your here. I'm a huge fan of learning, and all too much of posts are opinions being thrown around like fact.

2 Chin- Not everyone is a fan of, or even cares about, anything that can be labled skill. Some of us are fans of traits. This is an ancient argument. For a longer period of time than not backing up wasn't proof of skill, ever, it was proof of weakness. Everything is P.O.V. I like Jeffries too, but it isn't fair to Tommy to allow Jeffries to over shadow, and certainly isn't fair to the blacks of the era. Tommy burns was a sham because Jack was around, so was Sam, and a few other choice names. But like I said Tommy's more of a symbol.

3 TBear- I'd love that mpeg.
Really cool post bro, I love your words on CHIN,,,,, I too am much more of a fan of traits than I am of skill..... because traits are BORN...... and can be cultivated,, these traits also boil down to a fighters natural personality,,,,,, Battling Nelson's name conjures up in the mind as fighter whose traits turned him into a ring monster,,,, he didn't have an impregnable chin, (it was good though),, he had an impregnable will to win, get up as many times as it took..... I wont name any names as for having a practically impregnable chin, but there is a fair number in that category........ as you said mate, chin is a trait, not a skill, but how important is it,... well as you once said about the Romans and their boxing training for making them as tough as they were legendary,,,, the ability to stay concious on an ancient battlefield does not even need mention, needless to say, you would be either dead, or far worse, captured,,,,,,,,,,, that might turn out to be rather painful....................... thanks for the excuse I needed to talk about romans,,, and Bat Nelson.