View Full Version : JEM MACE For My Mate GJC


McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:24 AM
JEM MACE -The FATHER Of MODERN BOXINGFor My Buddy, GJC, Who Wanted To Learn More.The Knockout Tour
Bolton, Lancashire. 1864
Jem Mace's Circus is in town. Its proprietor, Champion of England, is touring the country challenging all-comers to last 3 three-minute rounds with him and offering a cash prize. Mace insists he is certain to knockout all his challengers. Innovating the ten count, he flattens them all but this time a foundryman nearly lasts the distance- till Mace finds an unusual shot to finish him off.
John L. Sullivan will copy Mace's idea -- 20 years later!
The Demand for Gloves
Liverpool. 1865
At the Myrtle Street Gymnasium, Mace teaches amateur boxers and publicly urges the use of gloves for professionals -- 2 years before the publication of the original Queensberry Rules.
But Mace's eagerness to protect his hands is not down to boxing reasons alone..
The First Professional Boxing Bout
Virginia City, Nevada. 1876
Thousands of indoor spectators watch Mace outpoint Bill Davis in a historic clash between professionals under Queensberry Rules.
Bullion Bonanza King John W. Mackay's role will indicate how, in future, fights will be made. The First of Australia's Golden Generation
Sydney. 1881
At Larry Foley's gym, The White Horse in George Street, Mace's former protege runs the earliest of the great boxing gyms, from which will descend Stillman's and the Kronk.
Peter Jackson, aged 20, born in the West Indies but an adopted Australian, learns by watching Mace and Foley spar. 10 years later, John L. Sullivan will preserve his world heavyweight title by refusing to meet Jackson on grounds of race.
But other Australian boxers, taught exclusively in Mace's style, will capture world titles at other weights.
A Unique Discovery
Timaru, South Island, New Zealand. 1882
Taking boxing into the theatres of New Zealand, Mace is the first in the world to hold open tournaments. He discovers nineteen-year old Bob Fitzsimmons and teaches him a unique punch.
Fitzsimmons will become a world champion at three separate weights.

Double - crossed but Defiant
Glasgow. 1890
Scheduled to fight a purely exhibition bout, Mace is double crossed by the notorious prizefighter Charlie Mitchell. Mitchell tries for a shock KO as the bell sounds. Mace is stunned but uses his great defensive skills to keep the vicious Mitchell at bay until the end of the fourth round. With no proper points system yet in operation, the way is open for a disgraceful decision.
Astonishingly, Mace is 58, fully twice as old as Mitchell. Yet, only two years before, in a world title fight, Mitchell had fought a draw with John L. Sullivan.
The National Sporting Club Rules
London, King Street. 1891 :boxing:

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:27 AM
Mace, preoccupied by a love affair and the decimation of his fortune, cannot attend N.S.C committee meetings. But, from these, the Queensberry Rules of Endurance are drawn up -- professional boxing is at last equipped with stipulated maximum rounds and a specific points system. These are the real Queensberry Rules, not the original ones of 1867-whose flaws Mace has consistently pointed out. The Marquess of Queensberry had no interest in scientific boxing. He preferred brutality and sat at ringside, bawling for more blood!

But Mace's fingerprints are all over these rules. The triumvirs of the N.S.C. were:

Lord Lonsdale -- who was taught to box by Mace as a boy of 11
John Fleming -- who picked Mace's brains for years in the sporting pubs of London
A.F. Bettinson -- who watched all Mace's exhibitions and based the points system -- in terms of defence -- entirely on Mace's style

The Acclamation of an American Legend
New York. 1896
On his previous trip to America, Mace had slipped up by bringing the inept New Zealand giant Herbert Slade to challenge John L. Sullivan. As a result, Sullivan's travesty of the Queensberry Rules was boosted and Mace's reputation suffered.
But now Jim Corbett, Sullivan's successor as world champion, welcomes Mace to New York to fight for the veterans championship and pays him a unique compliment.
Student of the master
Birmingham. 1902
With Mace publicly acknowledged, by Corbett and Kid McCoy, as the role model for all skilful American boxers, Philadelphia Jack O'Brien goes one further. He takes a working vacation at Mace's pub and is taught by the 70-year-old maestro.
Three years later, O'Brien shows exactly how much he has learned.

No truck with racism
London, King Street. 1907
In a sport notorious for the racism of John L. Sullivan, Mace welcomes the great black Canadian fighter Sam Langford to the National Sporting Club and champions his claims to a shot at the world title.
But, within a year, a campaign will begin which will earn Mace's contempt.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:30 AM
SHOWMAN And SPORTSTARThe Performance Artist
London, The Strand. 1856
Jem Mace, aged 25 and recently arrived from Norwich, takes the stage at a song and supper room. On violin, he performs his own composition 'The Cuckoo Song' and a popular medley including the gypsy ballad 'Black Jack Davey'. The audience demands an encore but Mace returns, stripped to the waist, performing his 'Grecian Statues' routine in which he displays his physique for feminine admirers. No one guesses the ruthless nature of his current employment.
The Circus Proprietor
Brighton, Sussex. 1862
Having broken into show business with black entrepreneur Pablo Fanque's Circus Royal, Mace is inspired by the flamboyant impresario 'Lord' George Sanger to form his own company. With musicians, acrobats and clowns he debuts at the south coast resort. Soon he will team up with leading circus publicity agent Harry Montague and it will be from the marriage of circus with boxing that the world of sport as spectacle will be born.
The All-round Athlete
London, Leicester Square. 1863
The 'Criterion Hall' is crowded out for the presentation to Mace of the Norwich Gold Cup by the 'mad lord' W.F. Windham. On display are all of Mace's trophies, including cups won for pedestrianism (professional running). His trainer had timed him at two minutes for the half mile. Training for his big fights by running 20 miles a day with top pedestrians, Mace combines two sports and makes roadwork the foundation of all boxers' training routine.

A Pleasure Ground Proprietor
West Derby, Lancashire. 1866
Seeking to emulate London's Cremorne Gardens, Mace opens the Strawberry Grounds just outside what was then the Liverpool city boundary.
He provides a bowling green, racing grounds and landscaped public gardens, attracting large crowds from Merseyside and industrial Lancashire.
But, when Mace goes to America, his successor wipes the Strawberry Grounds off the map of Liverpool with a shocking development.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:32 AM
Victory Parade
Liverpool. 1866
Returning to the city from a crushing victory in his third clash with Joe Goss, Mace is greeted by a crowd of 10,000 at Lime Street Station. What follows will underline his status as a self-made toff and working class hero.

Broadway Stage Star
New York. 1870
The first sportsman to take to the stage, Mace has a starring role in Shakespeare's 'As You Like It' at Niblo's Gardens on Broadway.
Mace's attire, as he strolls down the world-famous thoroughfare, will mark him out as a fashion icon of the era..
An Adventurer in Australia
Melbourne. 1881
Having made a fortune in Australia, Mace is ensconced in his own luxury hotel. He races his horses in the Melbourne Cup and teams up with John Christie-'Australia's Sherlock Holmes'- to bring his own version of law and order to the streets of Melbourne. But the Victorian police are not amused. Their surprise raid on his premises will have dire consequences for Mace.
Mobbed by Crowds
U.S.A. 1883
Mace's special train takes him from California to New York and, in the misguided belief that, at 51, he will challenge the drunken wife- beater John L. Sullivan -- a man half his age -- for the world title that was once his, a crowd of thousands at Washington and Philadelphia greets him, whilst, at Baltimore, the police are forced to take unprecedented measures to ensure his safety from a horde of well-wishers.
The Coronation Tournament
London, Royal Albert Hall. 1902
Inspired by Charles Melly's Liverpool Olympics in the 1860's, Mace has promoted the ideal of the commonality of all individual sports, giving shows combining boxing with wrestling, fencing, running, cycling and gymnastics. Throughout the English-speaking world, from Titusville to Timaru, he has combined these shows with musical performances.
Now, in a prestigious concert hall, he plays his part in the National Sporting Club's multi-sport tournament to celebrate the accession of a new monarch.

Swansong of an Entertainer
Newcastle. 1910
At St. James's Hall, the 79-year-old Jem Mace, his once splendid health finally giving way, performs on violin to a large cheering crowd. But, behind the facade, a lifelong weakness has left him desperate for cash and taking drastic measures to acquire it.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:35 AM
MACE'S WAY WITH WOMENVictory Parade
Liverpool. 1866
Returning to the city from a crushing victory in his third clash with Joe Goss, Mace is greeted by a crowd of 10,000 at Lime Street Station. What follows will underline his status as a self-made toff and working class hero.

Broadway Stage Star
New York. 1870
The first sportsman to take to the stage, Mace has a starring role in Shakespeare's 'As You Like It' at Niblo's Gardens on Broadway.
Mace's attire, as he strolls down the world-famous thoroughfare, will mark him out as a fashion icon of the era..
An Adventurer in Australia
Melbourne. 1881
Having made a fortune in Australia, Mace is ensconced in his own luxury hotel. He races his horses in the Melbourne Cup and teams up with John Christie-'Australia's Sherlock Holmes'- to bring his own version of law and order to the streets of Melbourne. But the Victorian police are not amused. Their surprise raid on his premises will have dire consequences for Mace.
Mobbed by Crowds
U.S.A. 1883
Mace's special train takes him from California to New York and, in the misguided belief that, at 51, he will challenge the drunken wife- beater John L. Sullivan -- a man half his age -- for the world title that was once his, a crowd of thousands at Washington and Philadelphia greets him, whilst, at Baltimore, the police are forced to take unprecedented measures to ensure his safety from a horde of well-wishers.
The Coronation Tournament
London, Royal Albert Hall. 1902
Inspired by Charles Melly's Liverpool Olympics in the 1860's, Mace has promoted the ideal of the commonality of all individual sports, giving shows combining boxing with wrestling, fencing, running, cycling and gymnastics. Throughout the English-speaking world, from Titusville to Timaru, he has combined these shows with musical performances.
Now, in a prestigious concert hall, he plays his part in the National Sporting Club's multi-sport tournament to celebrate the accession of a new monarch.

Swansong of an Entertainer
Newcastle. 1910
At St. James's Hall, the 79-year-old Jem Mace, his once splendid health finally giving way, performs on violin to a large cheering crowd. But, behind the facade, a lifelong weakness has left him desperate for cash and taking drastic measures to acquire it.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:37 AM
Victory Parade
Liverpool. 1866
Returning to the city from a crushing victory in his third clash with Joe Goss, Mace is greeted by a crowd of 10,000 at Lime Street Station. What follows will underline his status as a self-made toff and working class hero.

Broadway Stage Star
New York. 1870
The first sportsman to take to the stage, Mace has a starring role in Shakespeare's 'As You Like It' at Niblo's Gardens on Broadway.
Mace's attire, as he strolls down the world-famous thoroughfare, will mark him out as a fashion icon of the era..
An Adventurer in Australia
Melbourne. 1881
Having made a fortune in Australia, Mace is ensconced in his own luxury hotel. He races his horses in the Melbourne Cup and teams up with John Christie-'Australia's Sherlock Holmes'- to bring his own version of law and order to the streets of Melbourne. But the Victorian police are not amused. Their surprise raid on his premises will have dire consequences for Mace.
Mobbed by Crowds
U.S.A. 1883
Mace's special train takes him from California to New York and, in the misguided belief that, at 51, he will challenge the drunken wife- beater John L. Sullivan -- a man half his age -- for the world title that was once his, a crowd of thousands at Washington and Philadelphia greets him, whilst, at Baltimore, the police are forced to take unprecedented measures to ensure his safety from a horde of well-wishers.
The Coronation Tournament
London, Royal Albert Hall. 1902
Inspired by Charles Melly's Liverpool Olympics in the 1860's, Mace has promoted the ideal of the commonality of all individual sports, giving shows combining boxing with wrestling, fencing, running, cycling and gymnastics. Throughout the English-speaking world, from Titusville to Timaru, he has combined these shows with musical performances.
Now, in a prestigious concert hall, he plays his part in the National Sporting Club's multi-sport tournament to celebrate the accession of a new monarch.

Swansong of an Entertainer
Newcastle. 1910
At St. James's Hall, the 79-year-old Jem Mace, his once splendid health finally giving way, performs on violin to a large cheering crowd. But, behind the facade, a lifelong weakness has left him desperate for cash and taking drastic measures to acquire it.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:40 AM
WORLD CHAMPION PRIZEFIGHTERThe Beauty of a Broken Violin
Yarmouth, Norfolk. 1849
Jem Mace, an 18-year-old musician, is busking outside a seafront pub, well rewarded by an appreciative crowd. Suddenly, three drunken fishermen emerge. While the others jeer, the leader seizes Mace's violin and smashes it in half. Mace's response will shock and delight the spectators and change the course of his life.
The Last Request of a Noble Lord
London, St. Martin's Lane. 1858
After a brilliant debut in the outlawed London Prize Ring, Mace's luck has turned. Unable to admit the scandalous reasons for his no-show at a fight rendezvous, he is accused of cowardice and reduced to sparring for shillings in the back room of a London pub. Challenged by Lord Drumlanrig, he admits that he is banned from the ring. The fight- loving toff insists to Mace's boss that he must be given a chance to redeem himself. Three days later, Drumlanrig is dead- a victim of the 'Douglas Curse'.

A Clash of Titans
Godstone, Surrey. 1862
After their epic drawn world title fight, both England's Tom Sayers and America's John C. Heenan refuse Mace's challenge.
Only a middleweight, Mace takes the championship of England from the gigantic Sam Hurst and is then challenged by Tom King. King is four years younger, five inches taller and 20 pounds heavier -- a formidable opponent with an exceptional reach, fast hands and a fighting heart.
On the day of the fight, the driving wind and hail turns the ground underfoot into a quagmire, nullifying Mace's incredible footwork. But he finds another strategy to defeat King.
The Birth of the Knockout
Plumstead Marshes, Kent. 1863
With King retired, Mace is left with one effective challenger. Joe Goss is a powerful wrestler and a durable fighter, capable of soaking up punishment and lasting three hours. Mace dances round him, parries his punches and jabs him relentlessly. Goss is battered and blood-stained but refuses to give in. Suddenly Mace delivers a punch of unprecedented ferocity. Goss spins like a top, pitches forward senseless and remains unconscious on the turf for several minutes, with his legs twitching convulsively. Later, Mace describes the technique of the knockout.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:43 AM
The Supreme Boxer-Puncher
Purfleet, Essex. 1866
For his third fight with Goss, Mace dictates that a 16 foot ring will be used and that seconds must get out while a round is in progress. Deploying the full range of shots open to a bare knuckle fighter but ducking and weaving like a future glove boxer, Mace crushes Goss. His display is hailed as "the grandest bit of fighting ever seen".
But, as the enthralled spectators disperse, none can know that forces are already in motion which will threaten the very existence of the outlaw sport.
Arrested in a Bedroom
London, Herne Hill. 1867
Inspector Silverton of Scotland Yard, fanatical opponent of the London Prize Ring, leads a midnight raid on Mace's secret hideout. Mace, on the eve of his title clash with Ned O'Baldwin, the 'Irish Giant', violently resists arrest and is outnumbered by a squad of police.
The outcome of Mace's court appearance next day will be a decisive turning point in his career.
The Last and First of the Champions
Kennerville, Louisiana. 1870
Just outside New Orleans city limits, Mace, the last Champion of England, faces Tom Allen, Champion of America.
Using his switchblade left jab, blocking, feinting, changing pace and feet, Mace throws unprecedented combination punches. Cutting off the ring like a fistic jailer, he outclasses Allen and is hailed as the first World Champion. He will stand at the head of the lineage which will later include Jeffries, Dempsey, Louis, Ali and Tyson.

Targeted for Murder
Bay.St. Louis, Mississippi. 1871
Irish-American Joe Coburn, challenges Mace for the world title. Despite an injured wrist and a referee who never calls Coburn's numerous fouls, Mace secures a draw and retains his crown.
Afterwards, he narrowly escapes with his life as bullets fly. With contract killers on his trail, he cannot remain in America.
'Advance Australia!'
Murrumbidgee Reef, New South Wales. 1879
Outlaw Ned Kelly postpones his confrontation with Mace as police converge in a vain attempt to stop Mace's protege, Larry Foley, from challenging for the Australian title. The fight goes ahead, Foley wins, and on his victorious train ride to Melbourne, is acclaimed by patriotic crowds chanting an anti-colonial slogan -- but lustily adding "Three cheers for Jem Mace!".
The Knives are Out
Maison Laffitte, France. 1886
Prizefight buffs attempt to revive the bare knuckle ring in France where the police will not intervene. Mace agrees to referee a fight for the 'championship' near a centuries- old chateau outside Paris. But English thugs invade the ring and, threatening him with knives, compel him to declare the result they've wagered on. Once he regains his freedom, Mace takes a decision which heralds the end of a sporting era.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:46 AM
The GYPSY CONTROVERSYAn Average Working -Class Family
Beeston, Norfolk 1831
On April 8, Jem Mace is born in the remote village of Beeston-next-Mileham in rural Norfolk. He is the fifth of eight children born to William Mace and Ann Mace (formerly Rudd). He is christened at the Anglican Church of Saint Mary the Virgin. Parish records describe his father as "a labourer". But later documents will indicate the true nature of his life-style.

The Gypsy Connection
Beeston 1839
Jem's uncle, Barney Mace, has married the teenage daughter of a well-known Romany family, Lurena Baker, after falling in love with her when they met at Norwich Fair.
Their eldest son, Pooley Mace, is born. He will become the close friend and lifelong companion of his cousin Jem.
The Ring Nickname
Norfolk 1850. London 1857
At the time of his first appearance as a prize fighter, Mace is nicknamed the 'Swaffham Gypsy' (from a town near his home village).
By the time of his debut in the London Prize Ring, this is shortened -- simply to 'The Gypsy'. Soon Francis Louis Dowling, editor of the leading fight mag of the day, will describe Mace in insulting language verging on racism.
A Statement in Court
London, Holborn 1861
Lord William Frederick Windham of Felbrigge Hall, Norfolk is called to give evidence at Gray's Inn court. He seeks to avoid being disinherited by his uncle who claims he is 'mad' and who has described crazy behaviour.
But, in court, Windham seems entirely lucid. He asserts that the family of Jem Mace, Champion of England, have been tenants of his forebears at Beeston for over a hundred years. This is, of course, incompatible with the gypsy way of life.
The Great Street Fight
Dublin 1864
Mace is in Ireland but has refused to fight his challenger for the world title, Joe Coburn, an Irish-American. Mace gives as his reason his belief that Coburn's nominated referee is in fact his own uncle.
Nevertheless, a ballad entitled 'The Cowardly Englishman' circulates. It accuses Mace of lack of courage.
Irish bare- knuckle fighter, Bartley Gorman I, himself a gypsy, believes that Mace is a fellow Romany and that he has let the side down. But the outcome will not be what Gorman expected..
The Autobiography
London, 1908
In his autobiography, '50 years a Fighter', Jem Mace, aged 77, states "the assertion, oft repeated, that I have gypsy blood in my veins, is completely untrue".
Mace attributes the notion to the fact that his cousin and constant companion, Pooley Mace, is indeed a half Romany.

The Final Caravan
Grassendale, Lancashire 1910
Nearing the end of his life, Mace spends time at a gypsy settlement on an abandoned farm where a boxing booth is in operation.
But he is also to be found on the road with Sullivan's Circus -- and at various fixed addresses in London.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:51 AM
EXPERT'S OPINIONS Of MACE"Mace was the very ideal of what a fighter should be. No other man has ever combined such excellences. A wonderful specimen of the ambidextrous boxer who could 'change legs' and use either hand with equal rapidity, a most tremendous hitter and a judge of time and distance whose superior it would be impossible to find".
Henry Sampson, foremost journalist of the transition from the prize ring to Queensberry Rules. 1878


"He was a scientific boxer endowed with a marvellous knowledge of ring craft. He may indeed be compared with any of the great champions who were his predecessors and he has never been surpassed".
Fred Henning, historian of the prize ring .1899


"Jem Mace was the first man who showed American fighters the advantages of feinting and footwork. You can readily see what a fighter today would amount to without these essentials!"
Philadelphia Jack O'Brien, future Light- heavyweight Champion of the World .1902


"I lay it down as an undeniable maxim that there is only one style in boxing. That style found its most perfect expression in Jem Mace".
A.F. Bettinson, co-founder of the National Sporting Club. 1905


"I do not consider Tom Sayers to have possessed anything like the science of Mace and no one will presume to place him on the same pedestal as Mace as an artist"
Frank Bradley, editor of British sports paper ' Mirror of Life' .1910

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:53 AM
"Jem Mace was the first pugilist to study out the scientific side of boxing. It is to him that we owe the changes which have elevated the sport"
Jim Corbett, first World Heavyweight Champion under Queensberry Rules. 1910



"Nothing will shake my conviction that Mace was the cleverest man of any weight that ever fought in a ring, either with gloves or bare knuckles. He was the greatest exponent of the gospel of the straight left and a supreme artist and master of his craft"
Bernard John Angle, world famous boxing referee.1925


"Great as Mace was when fighting under London Rules, it was as a glove artist that he appeared at his best. He discouraged bare fist fighting and brought public attention to the use of the mitts. He did more to foster the pure science of boxing than any other man of his era and was one of the greatest ring men with the gloves that boxing has produced".
Nat Fleischer, founder of The Ring magazine. 1957


"Great and glorious a fighter as he was in his prime, he was even greater as a scientific boxer. He had a tremendously hard punch but it was chiefly his marvellous boxing ability which carried him to the top of the fistic tree and enabled him to present an unbattered face to the world in his old age".
Peter McInnes, boxing writer. 1998

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 08:58 AM
NOT QUITE AN AMERICANJem Mace visited the U.S. many times and considered settling in either New York or San Francisco. He named one of his sons Benjamin Franklin Mace and he adorned his boxing booth in England with the Stars and Stripes.

But Hollywood neatly airbrushed out his status as the Father of Boxing. As an Englishman, he did not fit the need for an all-American father for the ultimate American sport. Biopics such as 'The Great John L.' and ' Gentleman Jim' would install Irish- Americans John L. Sullivan and Jim Corbett in the fistic pantheon.

But it was not Sullivan- a fighter proclaiming his allegiance to the Queensberry Rules but ready to flout them when it suited his purposes- who transformed the outlawed sport of prizefighting. Nor was it Corbett, who freely admitted that the transition from prizefighting to glove boxing was principally the work of Mace.

Few of America's future boxing heroes would be able to name Jem Mace as the father of their sport but, in the ghettos and barrios of America's great cities, his legacy has endured.
The UNMARKED GRAVEJem Mace died in Jarrow on November 30 1910. On December 6, at Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool, he was laid to rest in a grave with no headstone and only a perfunctory numerical marker.

Though he had died penniless, a fitting memorial could easily have been subscribed by any of numerous wealthy persons who, in his lifetime, he had splendidly entertained. But Jem Mace did not fit the need for a gentlemanly hero of English sport.

Unlike England's cricket captain C.B. Fry, Mace was not educated at Repton and Oxford. He was the son of a roving rural working man and, deprived of all education, remained illiterate for the first 30 years of his life.
Stigmatised -- whether accurately or not -- as a gypsy, his early life as a travelling violinist, his background in the 'sinful' world of the circus and his empathy with and appeal to women evoked the resentment of the righteous -- who were only too keen for him to be speedily forgotten.

It would take until the next century for a proper memorial to be placed at the grave, thanks to the Merseyside Former Boxers Association. :owned2:

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 09:33 AM
JEM MACE In His PRIMEhttp://www.boxingscene.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=1163&pictureid=10296

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 09:35 AM
JEM MACE and Gentleman JIM CORBETThttp://www.boxingscene.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=1163&pictureid=10297

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 09:37 AM
The Great JEM MACE In Action.http://www.boxingscene.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=1163&pictureid=10298

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 09:41 AM
Only The Greats Get Their Very Own Statuehttp://www.boxingscene.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=1163&pictureid=10299

GJC
10-07-2011, 10:34 AM
Nice work Mac :)
You don't actually transcribe these articles do you? There is a trick?
Like to know because I've got so many boxing books I'd like to put in articles from

Pastrano
10-07-2011, 10:37 AM
Man, you really put lotta work and soul into this, good work.:biggthump I must say, he didnt look like he had gypsy blood and he himself denied it. As he was obviously not a racist, this must have been the truth.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 11:12 AM
Nice work Mac :)
You don't actually transcribe these articles do you? There is a trick?
Like to know because I've got so many boxing books I'd like to put in articles from
I just learnt from Poet, I think there is a different technique to doing your own books. If you have a scanner you may be able to post these. I got these straight off the net. I type in any fighter I'm interested in on google, then look for articles that are good. When I find one I think would be a good post or thread, I then hold left click on the first word then drag across and down then right click and click on the copy logo that pops up. --------------------------------------- Then go to thread you want to post on or start one of your own, when you have the box open left click there and then right click, then just click on paste in the box that pops up...... submit post or thread and Bob's your uncle.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 11:15 AM
Man, you really put lotta work and soul into this, good work.:biggthump I must say, he didnt look like he had gypsy blood and he himself denied it. As he was obviously not a racist, this must have been the truth.
Gypsy or not, I doubt if many wanted to argue that fact with him, just too good a pugilist.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 11:25 AM
The Supreme Boxer-Puncher
Purfleet, Essex. 1866
For his third fight with Goss, Mace dictates that a 16 foot ring will be used and that seconds must get out while a round is in progress. Deploying the full range of shots open to a bare knuckle fighter but ducking and weaving like a future glove boxer, Mace crushes Goss. His display is hailed as "the grandest bit of fighting ever seen".
But, as the enthralled spectators disperse, none can know that forces are already in motion which will threaten the very existence of the outlaw sport.
Arrested in a Bedroom
London, Herne Hill. 1867
Inspector Silverton of Scotland Yard, fanatical opponent of the London Prize Ring, leads a midnight raid on Mace's secret hideout. Mace, on the eve of his title clash with Ned O'Baldwin, the 'Irish Giant', violently resists arrest and is outnumbered by a squad of police.
The outcome of Mace's court appearance next day will be a decisive turning point in his career.
The Last and First of the Champions
Kennerville, Louisiana. 1870
Just outside New Orleans city limits, Mace, the last Champion of England, faces Tom Allen, Champion of America.
Using his switchblade left jab, blocking, feinting, changing pace and feet, Mace throws unprecedented combination punches. Cutting off the ring like a fistic jailer, he outclasses Allen and is hailed as the first World Champion. He will stand at the head of the lineage which will later include Jeffries, Dempsey, Louis, Ali and Tyson.

Targeted for Murder
Bay.St. Louis, Mississippi. 1871
Irish-American Joe Coburn, challenges Mace for the world title. Despite an injured wrist and a referee who never calls Coburn's numerous fouls, Mace secures a draw and retains his crown.
Afterwards, he narrowly escapes with his life as bullets fly. With contract killers on his trail, he cannot remain in America.
'Advance Australia!'
Murrumbidgee Reef, New South Wales. 1879
Outlaw Ned Kelly postpones his confrontation with Mace as police converge in a vain attempt to stop Mace's protege, Larry Foley, from challenging for the Australian title. The fight goes ahead, Foley wins, and on his victorious train ride to Melbourne, is acclaimed by patriotic crowds chanting an anti-colonial slogan -- but lustily adding "Three cheers for Jem Mace!".
The Knives are Out
Maison Laffitte, France. 1886
Prizefight buffs attempt to revive the bare knuckle ring in France where the police will not intervene. Mace agrees to referee a fight for the 'championship' near a centuries- old chateau outside Paris. But English thugs invade the ring and, threatening him with knives, compel him to declare the result they've wagered on. Once he regains his freedom, Mace takes a decision which heralds the end of a sporting era.
Man oh man, how about that, Jem mace was going to fight the "Baddest Man on the planet", and legendary Bushranger, Ned Kelly. Just imagine fi Jem had TKO'd Kelly and Ned's gang got angry,.......... Poor Jem would have ended up with more bullet holes in him than Bonnie and Clyde's death car (a Model T. Ford). ----------------------------------------------------------------------- And very cool to read of Larry Foley,.... guess which two fighters he trained ??

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 02:40 PM
Mace was the first hell-raiser international super sports star, before, Ricky Hatton, Mohammad Ali, Jake La Motta, Roberto Duran and Mike Tyson......

So many fighters, ancient and modern, have attempted to prove nothing succeeds like excess. And many have had their lurid lives portrayed for posterity in a variety of books, plays and movies.

We are aware of the outrageous behaviour of notoriously-flawed individuals like Raging Bull Jake La Motta, Roberto Duran and Mike Tyson. Every era has someone whose outside-the-ring antics have caused jaw-dropping disbelief.

But how many fans can identify this character whose scandalous personal lifestyle outraged Britain?

Married three times, twice bigamously; he also kept two teenage mistresses. A seducer of dozens of women, he fathered 14 children by five different mothers.

We are talking about Jem Mace, a blacksmith***8217;s son from Norfolk. He was born 177 years ago and was universally recognised as the bare-knuckle world heavyweight champion.

Mace***8217;s riveting story is brought to life by Graham Gordon, a specialist in 19th-century history, and I highly recommend his book, Master of the Ring.

It is no exaggeration to say Mace was the Muhammad Ali of his age, the first global sporting superstar.

Even within the constraints of 19th-century transport and communications Jem***8217;s fame and notoriety went before him as he fought in America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Mace began fighting at 14 in 1845, taking on lads from surrounding villages.

An accomplished violinist Mace decided to earn his living as a prize-fighter though the sport was illegal.

He joined a boxing booth and, for 2 a week, took on all-comers, developing skills not seen before.

The prize ring was brutal in the extreme. Men smashed each other***8217;s faces to a pulp with bare fists pickled to make them iron-hard.

Jem pioneered the left jab and worked on the art of feinting and slipping punches. He was a defensive master but could also knock men cold with a single blow.

Known as the father of boxing, Mace was loved equally by the working classes and the aristocracy ***8212; he was on first name terms with the, Lord Lonsdale, Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII.

Because he was hounded by police, Mace sailed for the United States where he was just as popular and beat Tom Allen in 1870 to win the world title.

Mace***8217;s brilliant ring-craft ensured he was in demand as a coach and was constantly taking part in exhibition bouts, even into his late seventies.

He was an astute businessman who owned goldmines, circuses, hotels and pubs among other ventures around the world.

It***8217;s estimated he earned 750,000 in his lifetime, today***8217;s equivalent of 20million.

Unfortunately Mace was a prolific gambler. When he died at 79 he was penniless and was buried in an unmarked grave.

Yet Jem was one of the greatest Victorians, revered by the public alongside Charles Darwin, Charles Dickens and Benjamin Disraeli.

In his later years Mace gave after-dinner speeches always bemoaning the lack of good English heavyweights. Now where have I heard that lament before?

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 02:49 PM
A Fact about Mace I just discovered......... He fought a minimum 15 fights with Herbert Maori Slade....... He had at least 7 fights with his ex-pupil, Larry Foley and George Belcher 4 times.. some were in Australia and others in America....... A busy boy our Jem.