View Full Version : The Art Of INFIGHTING By FRANK KLAUS


McGoorty
10-02-2011, 07:39 PM
The ART Of IN-FIGHTING - By FRANK KLAUS ex MW Champeen of the World.Hey Blokes !!!..... I have just found a link to HOF'r FRANK KLAUS's fantastic Boxing manual on his particular methods for the boxer who wants to master the advanced art of In-Fighting. With this link I will put up, it's a very simple matter for you to download the entire book, photo's and all, and what a collection of great Klaus photos they are, there are some incredibly rare photo's of Frank in action against Carpentier and Papke,... what's more, all the photos are there for specific training purposes. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- There are many surprises in store for those who think they might know a bit about being in the pocket, man is Klaus a very smart and sophisticated fighter..... he'll even teach you specific things like paralysing an opponents arm with a sharp precise blow square on the bicep.... or how to duck, block and strike all in one movement....... A warning to all active boxers at Boxing Scene... You will seriously enjoy this book, I read the lot and if you want to understand just how much knowledge these great old champions had, and how Frank used his brand of ring-generalship to beat seriously good and extremely tough men. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I think many of you who download and read this book will agree with me that Frank Klaus was a thinking fighter's, thinking fighter........................ From one of the greatest in-fighters of them all, Frank Klaus..... Enjoy, here is the link and I welcome your discussion about the art of in-fighting folks, so please comment. http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/the-art-of-in-fighting/15104806

tryan123
10-02-2011, 11:02 PM
Its a good read, and I agree with a lot of his theory, but I dont think this book makes him out to be an unsung hero, or anything of the sort. :boxing:

Tryan123

McGoorty
10-02-2011, 11:31 PM
Its a good read, and I agree with a lot of his theory, but I dont think this book makes him out to be an unsung hero, or anything of the sort. :boxing:

Tryan123
You should check him out, one of the ATG's and HOF'rs. I'm not putting him on a pedestal, I think my mate was as good on the inside and somebody obviously taught him some finer points, so there's some combined knowledge..... And I think his record as a fighter also lends him maximum credibility as a man who knows what he's about... -------------------------------------------------------- This thread is meant to give our readers an inside view into the mind of a champion,.. a genuine champion, not these paper champions we have today..... How many world champions were there at last count today.... 200 ????...... it's some massive number like that, -------------------------------------------------------------- When Klaus held the title there was also a rival world title,.. but only applying to the MW division then...... so 2 world MW champs then,... and almost a dozen now. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The thread is also in reply to those that think these old-timers were cavemen who had just invented the wheel, instead of the highly sophisticated destroyers they actually were....... There are some tricks of the old-timers trade that have vanished,.......... I believe the guys from that era as the pinnacle of the sport.. think Joe Gans and you will know where I'm coming from.

raf727
10-02-2011, 11:49 PM
Props man, one of the greatest Pittsburgh fighters ever

McGoorty
10-03-2011, 12:07 AM
Props man, one of the greatest Pittsburgh fighters ever
You are welcome mate, he was a top MW in the first 20 years of the twentieth century, which had at least 2 dozen great fighters...... and almost a contemporary of my mate who reached his prime two years after Klaus's last fight. This is maybe the Golden age of middleweights,.... throw in the fact that Tommy Burns won the HW title and was never more than a MW,..... well,.... I'll name 20 awesome MW's if you really want to know. ---------------------------- I hope Pittsburgh still loves him...... what a great book, how many of today's fighters even know half of what Klaus knew about in-fighting,..... and I had no idea there was much science in that part of the game..... maybe it's because I've seen so much modern boxing.

Dan-O-Mac
10-04-2011, 06:28 PM
Thanks for the link! I'm gonna try to read through it this weekend.

diallo
10-04-2011, 07:15 PM
Is there a link to download the book?

McGoorty
10-05-2011, 05:19 AM
Thanks for the link! I'm gonna try to read through it this weekend.
It is at the top of the page, but here it is again..... You can download it onto your computer after the pages have finished loading,... and it's for free... with a big blue download button to click on....... The book is very good..... try this link.. http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/the-art-of-in-fighting/15104806

McGoorty
10-05-2011, 05:21 AM
Is there a link to download the book?
Sorry that last post and link was for you... I clicked by accident.

diallo
10-06-2011, 06:21 PM
OH Ok, you're actually linkin the wrong one, You're linking the one to purchase. But i searched for it and found it thanks!

McGoorty
10-06-2011, 11:30 PM
OH Ok, you're actually linkin the wrong one, You're linking the one to purchase. But i searched for it and found it thanks!
I'm glad mate, it took me ages to work things out, and I still don't know how to separate paragraphs. Have a good read of it, I think there's stuff in here that you don't hear about much, and I can say with all truth, I'd hate to fight Klaus,.... I'd be jelly in short time.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 01:27 AM
THE ART OF
IN-FIGHTING
BY
FRANK KLAUS
EX-MIDDLE-WEIGHT CHAMPION OF THE WORLD
Published at the offices of
***8220;BOXING,***8221;
ATHLETIC PUBLICATIONS LTD.,
Link House, 54 & 55, Fetter Lane, & 151, Fleet-st.,
London, E C. 4

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 01:32 AM
THE ART OF
IN-FIGHTING
BY
FRANK KLAUS
EX-MIDDLE-WEIGHT CHAMPION OF THE WORLD
Published at the offices of
***8220;BOXING,***8221;
ATHLETIC PUBLICATIONS LTD.,
Link House, 54 & 55, Fetter Lane, & 151, Fleet-st.,
London, E C. 4
CONTENTS.
PAGE
I N T R O D U C T I O N ***8212; W H A T I S I N - F I G H T I N G ? . 13***8212;14
G E T T I N G I N T O C L O S E Q U A R T E R S . . . 26
S T O P P I N G L E F T L E A D A N D G E T T I N G I N T O P U N C H
T H E R I B S . . . . . . . 30
S I D E - S T E P P I N G L E F T , A N D G E T T I N G H O M E W I T H
L E F T O N T H E H E A R T . . . . 31
G U A R D I N G A G A I N S T D A N G E R W H E N A T T A C K I N G***8212;
L E F T J O L T T O P L A C E T H E D E A D L Y R I G H T . 32
I N - F I G H T E R ***8217; S MO S T D E A D L Y P U N C H . . 34
A V O I D I N G A D R I V I N G R I G H T , B L O C K I N G T H E
L E F T , A N D P U N C H I N G S T O M A C H . . 35
F O R C I N G A N O P P O N E N T T O T H E R O P E S . . 36
T H E L I V E R P U N C H . . . . . 38
WA T C H I N G A N O P P O N E N T ***8217; S L E G S W H E N H U G -
G I N G . . . . . . . 40
F E I G N I N G ***8220; G R O G G I N E S S ***8221; . . . . 44
T H E E Y E S A N D T H E B R A I N . . . . 44
R I G H T H O O K T O T H E J A W***8212;A R E M E D Y F O R T H E
P U S H I N G B O X E R . . . . . 48
WH E N A P U N C H L O O K S E A S Y . . . . 50
P R E C O N C E I V E D A T T A C K S . . . . 50
R E C O N N O I T R I N G W H E N A T C L O S E Q U A R T E R S . 54vi CONTENTS.
PAGE
P L A C I N G T H E R I G H T - A R M J O L T . . . 54
T H E J A B . . . . . . . 56
B E A T I N G A N O P P O N E N T B Y P U N C H I N G H I S G L O V E D
H A N D S O R A R M S . . . . . 58
B R E A K I N G A P A R T A N O P P O N E N T ***8217; S A R M S T O
F A C I L I T A T E A N A T T A C K . . . . 64
I N - F I G H T I N G P H A S E S I N A C T U A L C O N T E S T S . 64
P U N C H I N G T H E O P P O N E N T W H O H O L D S . . 65
WH E N T O H O L D A N O P P O N E N T . . . 66
H O O K I N G T H E R I G H T W H I L E T H E L E F T I S B E I N G
H E L D . . . . . . . 66
B R E A K I N G A WA Y S A F E L Y . . . . 70
H O L D I N G A N A R M I N C H A N C E R Y . . . 72
T R A I N I N G . . . . . . . 73 ILLUSTRATIONS.
THE AUTHOR IN PRIVATE LIFE . . FRONTISPIECE
PAGE
F R A N K K L A U S , E X - MI D D L E - WE I G H T C H A M P I O N
O F T H E WO R L D . . . . . . 15
F R A N K K L A U S A N D H I S S P A R R I N G P A R T N E R ,
F R A N K MA D O L E . . . . . 17
A N O B V I O U S O P E N I N G F O R T H E I N - F I G H T E R . 19
P U S H I N G T H E L E F T L E A D A S I D E , A N D G E T T I N G
I N O N T H E R I B S , L I V E R O R H E A R T . . 21
A D E V A S T A T I N G P U N C H T O T H E H E A R T , F O L -
L O W E D B Y R I G H T T O T H E R I B S . . 23
T H E I N - F I G H T E R ***8217; S M O S T D E A D L Y P U N C H : T H E
R I G H T D R I V E T O T H E P I T O F T H E S T O M A C H 25
A S M A R T T R I P L E MO V E M E N T : S I D E - S T E P P I N G
R I G H T , S T O P P I N G L E F T , A N D G E T T I N G H O M E
O N S T O M A C H . . . . . 27
R U S H I N G A N O P P O N E N T T O T H E R O P E S . . 29
T H E L I V E R P U N C H , A F T E R C A T C H I N G O P P O -
N E N T ***8217; S R I G H T O N T H E N E C K . . . 33
WA T C H I N G Y O U R O P P O N E N T ***8217; S L E G MO V E M E N T S 37
T H E R I G H T U P P E R - C U T T O T H E J A W , A F T E R
D U C K I N G Y O U R O P P O N E N T ***8217; S R I G H T . . 39viii ILLUSTRATIONS.
PAGE
T H E R I G H T H O O K T O T H E J A W . . . 41
T H E P U N C H T O T H E H E A R T . T H E R E S U L T O F
A P R E C O N C E I V E D D E L I V E R Y . . . 43
L O O K I N G U P F O R A N O P E N I N G T O T H E J A W . 45
G E T T I N G H O M E W I T H T H E R I G H T - A R M J O L T . 47
P A R A L Y S I N G A N O P P O N E N T ***8217; S A R M B Y P U N C H I N G
H I S B I C E P S . . . . . . 49
M A K I N G A N O P E N I N G B Y B R E A K I N G O P P O N E N T ***8217; S
A R M S A P A R T . . . . . 51
U S I N G L E F T O N T H E O P P O N E N T W H O H O L D S . 53
B R I N G I N G A B O U T A D O U B L E C L I N C H F O R T H E
R E F E R E E ***8217; S I N T E R V E N T I O N . . . 55
H O O K I N G T H E M A N W H O H O L D S . . . 57
H O O K I N G R I G H T O N F I N D I N G T H E L E F T S T O P P E D 59
T H E S A F E ***8220; B R E A K ***8221; . . . . . 61
T H E L E F T A R M I N C H A N C E R Y . . . . 63
P U N C H I N G B O D Y W I T H T H E R I G H T , W H I L E L E F T
I S B E I N G H E L D . . . . . 67
A P E C U L I A R I N C I D E N T : P A P K E F A L L I N G O N T O
A P U N C H . . . . . . 69
G E O R G E E N G L E , MA N A G E R T O F R A N K K L A U S . 71PREFACE.
IN writing this book I hope to supply a want.
By that I mean the bringing to light of a far too
little known science, which seems to have been but
elementarily studied by the modern-day boxer.
And how all-important! How many pugilistic
battles have been lost owing to an altogether
inadequate knowledge of the most vital principle of
boxing! The old-fashioned hit, stop and get-away
system, although still the predominant note in the
noble art, has been sensibly strengthened, yet it is
remarkable to realise how few boxers are aware of
this fact.
Without wishing to claim any particular beauty
for in-fighting, years of practical experience have
convinced me that it is, perhaps, the most-effective
weapon in the hands of the boxer to-day. Conservatism is as fatal to boxing as it is when applied
to any other form of sport.
I am sorry to say that in England this sentiment,
as applied to the art of boxing and contemporary
pastimes, is rampant. The last Olympic Games
were a potential testimony to this particular state of
things.
In France there appears to exist a greater tendency to ***8220;move with the times.***8221; Such boxers as
Georges Carpentier succeed where others fail, owing
to this desire to -delve into the ***8220;up to date***8221; in
things athletic.x PREFACE.
Without being of very recent origin, in-fighting
has never been practised with such devastating
effects as at the present day.
The all-dominating feature of a contest surely
lies in the beating of an opponent. How can this
be done with any degree of confidence, if one enters
upon a battle inadequately armed?
Taking all other things as equal, such as weight,
endurance, training and skill, the man with the
better idea of in-fighting must ***8220;come out on top.***8221;
This is but a logical deduction, one that should
appeal to the young boxer just launching on a
pugilistic career. Such defeats as those sustained
by Bombardier Billy Wells are generally the result
of an incomplete fistic education, that is to say, of a
lack of in-fighting experience. The old notion that
the straight left will beat any man is distinctly out
of gear in these times, especially when we have
such examples as those afforded us by Palzer and
Gunboat Smith when they defeated the Bombardier.
Victory in each of these instances appears to have
favoured the man who knew just the moment to get
to close quarters, and annul all the work done by
the more stylish boxer. If, as must be generally
admitted, only victory counts in a boxing contest,
then it is for us to find the best means to secure this
desirable end.
From a spectacular point of view, in-fighting
seems to lose in comparison with the stand-up longrange methods. This brings me to the point as to
whether it is better to be what is known as a ***8220;pretty
boxer***8221; and remain a mediocrity or study furtherPREFACE. xi
and more effectual principles and thus become a
champion.
In-fighting is very like an olive; one wants
educating up to its taste, so to speak. The reason
that close-range boxing is not popular must be that
it is not understood. To dislike a thing is to condemn it, in spite of its intrinsic merits.
There is really just as much beauty in in-fighting
as there is in all the more familiar phases of the
noble art; the fault mostly lies in the fact that the
public refuse to see it.
It is my earnest desire to delineate in this little
volume not only the hidden secrets and artistic
merits of in-fighting, but to show its imperative
utility to all.
Having perused, studied, inwardly digested and
thoroughly mastered its subtleties, I trust that
readers may have found a new force in its relation
to the noble art of self-defence.
I should also like to take this opportunity of
thanking my excellent manager, George Engel, my
sparring partner, Frank Madole, and my friend,
F. H. Hurdman Lucas (of ***8220;Boxing***8221;), for the
valuable assistance they have given me in producing
this little work.
THE AUTHOR

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 01:44 AM
INTRODUCTION.
What is In-Fighting?
To this question I might easily reply, that in-fighting is out-fighting’s greatest ally. The one can
strike more effectually with the help of the other,
and yet it is a remarkable fact that but few boxers
realise this truism.
Two forces are always better than one. Although
the knock-out frequently occurs as the result of a
long-range punch, a boxer is necessarily heavily
handicapped when opposed to another who is equally
capable of inflicting decisive defeat at close quarters.
The inference here is obvious: arm yourself with
every available means of victory, thus reducing the
elements of bad luck to a minimum, and by that I
mean that a boxer equipped with all the necessary
knowledge of in-fighting and its attendant forces
reduces his chances of defeat.
How often do we hear of the “lucky punch”
being responsible for a boxer’s defeat! Without for
a moment wishing to deny that the element of luck
plays some part in boxing contests, victory is
generally acquired by the more skilful; by the14 THE ART OF IN-FIGHTING
boxer who, possessed of a more profound knowledge
of the game, imposes it on an opponent.
To sum up, in-lighting is an all too-neglected art,
one that at any moment during a contest is capable
of turning defeat into victory. It is the artillery of
pugilism; the besieging force that, by its continual
pounding at the outer walls of an opposing element,
finally reduces it to capitulation. Of course, strategy,
must play an important part in this particular form
of boxing, as it must in every other.
Strategy: Good and Bad.
How often has superior? strategy won the day
when applied even to superior forces?
This very important part of a boxer’s in-fighting
education cannot be imparted: it should develop
with experience.
Seldom is it that two boxers follow exactly the
same style. It therefore remains for the one or
the other to formulate his plan of attack and defence
according to the particular idiosyncrasies of his
opponent.
Some there are whose peculiarity is to protect the
jaw with an almost motherly care.
This very action is an indication of weakness on
that man’s part, his protective spirit but acting as a
clue for the locating of the vulnerable spot in his
composition.
Others will at once expose their weakest part by
the slightest gesture. A feint at the stonmach, for
instance, will sometimes make an opponent gasp in
expectation of the punch that he thinks is coming.Fig. 2—Frank Klaus, Ex-Middle-Weight Champion of the World.16 THE ART OF IN-FIGHTING
Such a one should prove an easy prey for the the it
fighter, for by judicious manœuvring it is possible
to so demoralise the boxer with the frail body as to
finally beat him.
The strategy of making an opponent either drop
or bring his hands up, therby compelling him to
expose a vital spot, is as old as the hills as regards
long-range boxing. Successive feints will often
accomplish the purpose, but with in-fighting the
modus operandi is totally difierent.
Feinting while at Close Quarters.
Whereas ordinary feinting is but the implied
delivery of a punch, meant to disconcert an opponent
or put him off his guard, for the purpose of finding
the necessary opening for a preconceived delivery,
no such strategy is possible in in-fighting.
When close up to an opponent, punching becomes
a matter of intuition. One can neither properly
see what an opponent is going to do, nor is it often
possible to be guided by our eyesight as to the most by
exposed or attackable parts of his body.
At close range boxing becomes instinctive, that
is, we must rely mostly upon the sense of touch to
know exactly where and when to place a punch.
This particular development of the in-fighting art
may be acquired through following the instructions
given in this volume, and practising them often with
as many sparring partners as it is possible to find.
To always box with the same man is but to fall
into a single groove, from which it is extremely a
difficult to extricate oneself. Although there areFig. 3—Frank Klaus and his Sparring Partner, Frank Madole.18 THE ART OF IN-FIGHTING
but few variants of the straight left and right crosscounter, in-fighting offers new fields for the exploiting of, and coming into contact with, unsuspected
elements of the pugilistic art. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------The Infinite Possibilites in Boxing.
Although apparently simple, and to all appearances composed of but a few essentialities, the noble
art, like the violin, is never thoroughly mastered,
This assertion may seem strange to those who in
boxing see but the giving of a blow with either left
or right fist, the blocking of same, stepping back, or
ducking. But like the instrument just referred to,
and although with practically but as few strings to
work upon, boxing is ever full of variations. This
theory is based on the possibility of the almost
infinite transposal of, say, the numbers one to
twenty. As is well known, these may be placed in
thousands of ways, each one showing a different
total. So is it with boxing, for, although but made
up of an apparently limited gamut, its range of
possibilities is well-nigh without end.
This is especially noticeable with in-fighting,
wherein one must not only depend upon punching an
opponent, but so negative his counter attacks as to
always have the better of him. In-fighting (the
same rule applies to boxing generally) is not wholly
the inflicting of punishment, but the neutralising of
an adversary’s efforts.
A good defence is as necessary as a perfect attack,
and although some men can take more punishment
than others, a boxer has often but himself to blameB 2
Fig. 4—An Obvious Opening for the In-Fighter (see page 28).20 THE ART OF IN-FIGHTING
for boxing without the slightest regard for his
individual qualities.
A good in-fighter, for instance, would be courting
disaster in seeking to beat can opponent by longrange punching and vice versa. Boxers are often
led to such imprudences either by losing their temper
or being led into them by their opponent’s wiles.
Generalship in In-Fighting.
This brings us to ringcraft or generalship. As I
said, feinting, as generally understood, is next to
impossible in close quarters, for the simple reason
that the two boxers depend entirely upon the sense
of touch. Instead of feinting, therefore, it would
perhaps be better to substitute the word cunning or
craft, when applied to in-fighting, or, better still,
generalship. The aim of a general, we all know, is
to deceive the enemy, but whereas there are many
ways of doing this at long-range boxing, the field for
such strategy is narrowed up while in-fighting.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 02:55 AM
The Waiting Game.
If, by his style of boxing, your opponent should
have practically intimated the fact that he has a
weak stomach, it is bad generalship to immediately,
attack that particular spot. Let the in-fighter
direct his attention to the ribs and liver, with an
occasional visit ***8220;higher up.***8221; The chances are that
he will sooner or later find the opening that he has
patiently waited for. The same strategy applies to
the jaw. A boxer with a ***8220;glass***8221; chin invariably believes himself safe when at close quarters,
and, although perhaps an indifferent in-fighter, he
will seek that which he fondly believes should prove
immunity from danger, in continual hugs.
Although it will be next to impossible to reach that
man***8217;s jaw at such times, it remains. for the into fighter to so weaken his opponent by body punches
as to eventually find little or no difficulty in catching
him on the vulnerable ***8220;point***8221; after the break.
The in-fighter***8217;s most deadly work is effected on
the body (see Fig. 10, p. 33), although the jolt
(Fig. 16, p. 47) and half-arm hooks (see Fig. 13,
p. 41) to the chin, eyes, nose, and mouth play no
small part in helping an opponent to eventual
defeat.
Acquiring the Intuitive Instinct.
Generalship (or craft) in in-fighting is mostly a
gift. It is the intuitive appreciation of things at the
psychological moment, the knowing by his smallest
and apparently insignificant gesture or movement
what an opponent is about to do. This gift may
be sensibly developed by the observant boxer if he
will follow previous counsel, and find as many
sparring partners as he can with varying styles.
Having done this and furthermore, conscientiously practised all the moves set forth in this
volume, there is every reason to hope that the
subject, be he professional or amateur, will have
armed himself with yet one more essentiality
for his complete pugilistic education***8212;as complete as
such a curriculum can be, for in boxing there seems
to be always something new to learn. Conclusion.
In-fighting is one of these new things, for in
recommending it to my readers it is with the belief
and hope that they are already proficient in the art
of long-range boxing.
As I Said. at the commencement of this little work,
the one cannot be complete without the other,
whereas the two must perforce make for a perfect
whole.
Although I have made pa special study of if infighting and gained most of my contests by its aid,
out-fighting has been an equally important factor in
my successes. Many books have been writen on
boxing generally, but the art of in-fighting has
always played a very subordinate part therein.
Seeing the really great importance of this all tooneglected department of the noble art, the idea
occurred to me to specialise it in this book. I
trust that it may be the means of turning out more
A complete boxers than has hitherto been the case.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 02:55 AM
The Waiting Game.
If, by his style of boxing, your opponent should
have practically intimated the fact that he has a
weak stomach, it is bad generalship to immediately,
attack that particular spot. Let the in-fighter
direct his attention to the ribs and liver, with an
occasional visit “higher up.” The chances are that
he will sooner or later find the opening that he has
patiently waited for. The same strategy applies to
the jaw. A boxer with a “glass” chin invariably believes himself safe when at close quarters,
and, although perhaps an indifferent in-fighter, he
will seek that which he fondly believes should prove
immunity from danger, in continual hugs.
Although it will be next to impossible to reach that
man’s jaw at such times, it remains. for the into fighter to so weaken his opponent by body punches
as to eventually find little or no difficulty in catching
him on the vulnerable “point” after the break.
The in-fighter’s most deadly work is effected on
the body (see Fig. 10, p. 33), although the jolt
(Fig. 16, p. 47) and half-arm hooks (see Fig. 13,
p. 41) to the chin, eyes, nose, and mouth play no
small part in helping an opponent to eventual
defeat.
Acquiring the Intuitive Instinct.
Generalship (or craft) in in-fighting is mostly a
gift. It is the intuitive appreciation of things at the
psychological moment, the knowing by his smallest
and apparently insignificant gesture or movement
what an opponent is about to do. This gift may
be sensibly developed by the observant boxer if he
will follow previous counsel, and find as many
sparring partners as he can with varying styles.
Having done this and furthermore, conscientiously practised all the moves set forth in this
volume, there is every reason to hope that the
subject, be he professional or amateur, will have
armed himself with yet one more essentiality
for his complete pugilistic education—as complete as
such a curriculum can be, for in boxing there seems
to be always something new to learn. Conclusion.
In-fighting is one of these new things, for in
recommending it to my readers it is with the belief
and hope that they are already proficient in the art
of long-range boxing.
As I Said. at the commencement of this little work,
the one cannot be complete without the other,
whereas the two must perforce make for a perfect
whole.
Although I have made pa special study of if infighting and gained most of my contests by its aid,
out-fighting has been an equally important factor in
my successes. Many books have been writen on
boxing generally, but the art of in-fighting has
always played a very subordinate part therein.
Seeing the really great importance of this all tooneglected department of the noble art, the idea
occurred to me to specialise it in this book. I
trust that it may be the means of turning out more
A complete boxers than has hitherto been the case.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 02:59 AM
THE MOST IMPORTANT IN-FIGHTING PHASES
DESCRIBED AND ILLUSTRATED.
Getting in to Close Quarters.
Never be careless, even while practising. There
is a psychological moment for all things in this life,
but none is so important as to know the right one
to get. to close quarters with an opponent. This
again, It might say, is mostly a matter of intuitive
appreciation, for all movements in boxing are but
momentary. To let the proper chance slip by is,
perhaps, to lose a contest. M By practice the eye
becomes easily trained to this sort of telepathic
communication from an opponent. Some boxers do
not worry at all about anything when in the ***8220;gym***8221;
save the ordinary rudiments of boxing. They are
pleased to just punch a sparring partner all the
while. Knowing perfectly well that there is but
little danger of being damaged themselves, this
breeds acute carelessness that deteriorates a man***8217;s
science and lessens his mental vitality. A boxer
should be just as alert in the ***8220;gym***8221; as he is any
a ring, and always on the qui vive for new things, of
which the game is full.
Thus it is that the choosing of just the right time
to bore in to an opponent for in-fighting purposes is
mostly a matter of acuteness of minute observation.
In spite of that, there are moments when such openings are so obvious that a good in-fighter instantly.
sees the opportunity for the carrying out of his deadly work (see Fig. 4, p. 19). In this instance it
will be observed that tho opponent is backing away
from a punch that has apparently stung him, the
while ho subconsciously covers his jaw.
A man on the retreat becomes the prey of the
in-fighter, for to recover his backward impetus he
must perforce come to a standstill before resuming
any forward tendency. That is the time to rush
him (before ho can recover an aggressive advance),
force him to the ropes (see Fig. 9, p. 29), and there
have things all one***8217;s own way.
A man leaning with his back to the ropes is at the
greatest disadvantage possible, for apart from the
natural anxiety of finding himself so penned in, he
can but use his defensive qualities to extricate himself from so perilous a position. I worked this out
with much success during my contest with Papke,
for most of the time I had him pinned on the cords
practically helpless (see Fig. 23, p. 61). This was
my plan of campaign, for being himself a wonderful
in-fighter, I had to use this stratagem to out-general
his generalship.
Opposed to a good out-fighter, so much ***8220;ropefighting is not necessary, for the while he is sending out straight lefts and long-range rights, the
opportunities for closing in are manifold.
The most difficult man for the in-fighter to deal
with is he whose footwork keeps him constantly on
the move. Such a boxer wants watching as a cat
watches a mouse, for, unless tho in-fighter be very
sure of his attack, a fast-footed opponent will often
side-stop a rush and make the former look foolish. Too much of this is necessarily detrimental, not
only to the in-fighter***8217;s stamina, but also from the
fact that it influences the referee or judges to be
highly impressed with his adversary***8217;s cleverness.
In-fighting and footwork are alienated. This is
obvious, seeing that the most effectual work of the
in-fighter***8217;s is accomplished when mobility is impossible. Therefore, I repeat, to continually seek
close fighting with such an opponent is but to create
an unfavourable impression. Therefore, when
meeting a ***8220;ring scorcher,***8221; let him come to you.
He must clinch at some time or another, then bring
your in-fighting batteries into action. That he may
not be able to break away before you have punished
him some, it is advisable, the while you are doing
this, to bring all the necessary ***8220;pushing***8221; power
into your blows, and thus force your man! to the
ropes. Once there, the punching should become
crisp and sharp. Checking the Boxer with a Good Left.
Stopping Left Lead and getting into Punch the Ribs.
A boxer with a good left will naturally make
ample use of that particular member during the
whole of a contest. It therefore wants watching
and stopping. The out-fighter will invariably block
the punch with his right, cross-counter it with right
to the jaw, or counter with left. While sometimes
carrying out these excellent maxims, the in-fighter
has yet other means by which he may not only
effectually nullify the left lead, but thus make an
opening for close-range punches to the ribs, liver and heart. Of course, it may not succeed every
time, but the devastation wrought on an opponent***8217;s
body during these periodical attacks soon begins
to tell its tale. As will be seen in the illustration
(Fig. 5, p. 21), the getting outside of a left lead, and
pushing same aside with the right, tends to overbalance the opponent and nullify his possible punch
with the right. This leaves the body exposed for
the in-fighter***8217;s left on any vulnerable part of the
body.
This particular movement requires a deal of practice, the necessary assurance being acquired only
after long acquaintance with its intricacies. It looks
simple, but as the parry must be effected as shown,
namely, above the opponent***8217;s elbow, I should advise
plenty or trials in the ***8220;gym***8221; before trying it in a
ring. It will then become almost an instinct, but
as I said above, this particular move must be varied
with the out-fighting method of counteracting the
left lead to face. It is always bad policy to keep on
doing the same thing during a contest. The better
boxer is often he, who, by his craft, baffles his
opponent all through a bout.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 03:03 AM
Side-stepping Left, and getting Home with Left on
the Heart.
This movement resembles the last in many
respects, but instead of pushing aside the left as
before, the in-fighter must side-step it, thus leaving
the opponent***8217;s heart exposed for a left hook.
Having delivered this punch, the rightis able to
follow up with a ***8220;dig***8221; to the ribs. As will be seen, is almost impossible for an
opponent to retaliate in time, for his own left acts
as a guard for one***8217;s head, thus rendering his right
harmless. His only hope in such a case is to clinch,
but as the two before-mentioned punches have presumably done some damage, this getting to close
quarters by the opponent is but playing into, the infighter***8217;s hands. Should the former see fit to step
back instead of clinching, that is the moment to
force close quarters by rushing him to the ropes and
there continuing the body work until the referee
breaks. As will be seen from the illustration, a
certain amount of risk must be taken in getting one***8217;s
head outside the left lead, but having successfully
accomplished the side-stepping movement, all is
plain sailing. It is here necessary for me to
explain that, next to the punch to the pit of the
stomach, a blow under or near the heart is perhaps
the most devastating anywhere on the body. In
either instance the man so punished is liable to take
an excursion to the boards for any count, up to the
***8220;out.***8221;
Guarding against Danger when Attacking.
A Left Jolt to Place the Deadly Right.
This is one of the most important factors in infighting, as it is, by the way, at long-range work.
In the former case, however, its virtues are all the
more salient, seeing that the in-fighter, if not very
skilled, courts a, deal of danger. It is therefore incumbent upon him, when about to get to close
quarters, to think as much of the possibilities of
receiving a nasty blow as of giving same. Some boxers there are who will attack an opponent
with but one set object, namely, to deliver a certain
fancied punch. Irrespective of a possibly dangerous
counter attack, these men will wade into an opponent
for the sole purpose of accomplishing that which
is in their mind.
The in-fighter***8217;s thoughts should rest one the two
possibilities, and thus proceed on the necessary
caution and generalship. As will be seen in Fig. 7***8216;
my object was to get the right home to the pit of
the stomach.
The In-Fighter***8217;s most Deadly Punch.
This is undoubtedly the most deadly in-fighting
punch possible, and means decisive victory if properly administered. In trying for this, however, it
must be remembered that a right may come along
and upset our plan. Therefore the left is brought
up to the opponent***8217;s chin almost simultaneously
with the right drive to the mark. If successful the
left jolt should send your man***8217;s head back, a movement which causes the muscles of his stomach to
relax. As will be seen in the illustration, the infighter leaves his face open somewhat for his opponent***8217;s left. But admitting that the former has not
been successful with the said attack, the left may be
quickly brought round to cover or the head lowered
into the right shoulder, thus protecting the jaw.
This last movement would naturally cause the opponent***8217;s left to land on the head and not the chin. Avoiding a Driving Right, Blocking the Left, and
Punching Stomach.
The opponent in this picture has lashed out with
the right, but the quick-witted in-fighter***8217;s move is to
at once wade into his man and make the punch noneffectual, that is, presuming the said right hand
punch has been a straight drive to the chin, not a
hook or swing. The dodging of this delivery, by
quickly stepping in with the head slightly on one
side, has the effect of carrying your opponent***8217;s right
clean out of its straight course, so to speak, and
making it shoot over the shoulder. The impetus
created by the sending forth of the said punch, and
the missing of same, is such that you are well into
close quarters before your man can regain his proper
striking equilibrium. Seeing himself thus forcibly
brought into close contact with the in-fighter, the
opponent will try to do a bit of short-range work
himself, and his right arm being momentarily out of
action, the possibilities are that he will attempt a
half-arm left hook to your now exposed
chin. You must watch this, and catch the
punch in the palm of your right hand, at the same
time driving the left to the stomach. The result of
this will invariably be to compel your opponent to
bring his right back to protect the body, in which
case the in-fighter***8217;s left must get outside it in an
upward hook to the chin. This may lead to an
exchange at close quarters, during which the experienced in-fighter should again have things a good deal
his own way. Of course, there is no knowing
exactly what an opponent will do; but as I have
C 2 written elsewhere, the thorough digesting of this
work, followed by plenty of practice, should breed
the in-fighting instinct in most of my readers
enthusiastically bent upon acquiring same. Forcing an Opponent to the Ropes.
As I have said elsewhere, the most deadly infighting is served out to an opponent when he is on
the ropes. The point, therefore, is to get him there
as often as possible. Rugged boxers want a deal of
hustling, while those who depend mostly on
mobility, or fast footwork, are difficult to catch.
But even these must at some time or another find
themselves off their balance, or should I say that it
should be the in-fighter***8217;s object to effect this
unsteadiness of foot? The hit, stand, and get-away
boxer may never bring about this desirable state of
affairs himself, for having scored with a punch, he
usually skips back to contemplate the effect of his
shot. This allows the opponent to regain any slight
overbalancing that the blow may have caused.
The in-fighter, on the contrary, must at once
follow up a hard punch, and by so doing create a
further unsteadiness in his opponent***8217;s equipoise.
That is the moment to rush him, thus compelling
the retreating boxer to lose his left foothold and fall
back on the right. In the illustration, Fig. 9,
Madole***8217;s full weight at that moment is on one leg, so
that he is forced to step back to avoid falling altogether. The in-fighter must not relax his forward
movement until he has his man well up against the
ropes. The impact thus created will force most boxers to bend their backs over the top cord, this
movement causing them, to leave their stomachs
open for the in-fighter***8217;s demolishing work.
As in all other moves of the boxing game, the infighter must choose the psychological moment to
rush his opponent. If this does not present itself,
then he must use all his in-fighting strategy to make
it. For it must be remembered that one of the
greatest arts in boxing is creating favourable opportunities for oneself; that is to say, fusing every
honest means to compel an opponent to do just the
very thing that he himself would avoid. That is
where generalship comes in, that ever necessary
element in as all engagements wherein the ***8220;fortunes
of war***8221; play an important part.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 03:03 AM
Side-stepping Left, and getting Home with Left on
the Heart.
This movement resembles the last in many
respects, but instead of pushing aside the left as
before, the in-fighter must side-step it, thus leaving
the opponent’s heart exposed for a left hook.
Having delivered this punch, the rightis able to
follow up with a “dig” to the ribs. As will be seen, is almost impossible for an
opponent to retaliate in time, for his own left acts
as a guard for one’s head, thus rendering his right
harmless. His only hope in such a case is to clinch,
but as the two before-mentioned punches have presumably done some damage, this getting to close
quarters by the opponent is but playing into, the infighter’s hands. Should the former see fit to step
back instead of clinching, that is the moment to
force close quarters by rushing him to the ropes and
there continuing the body work until the referee
breaks. As will be seen from the illustration, a
certain amount of risk must be taken in getting one’s
head outside the left lead, but having successfully
accomplished the side-stepping movement, all is
plain sailing. It is here necessary for me to
explain that, next to the punch to the pit of the
stomach, a blow under or near the heart is perhaps
the most devastating anywhere on the body. In
either instance the man so punished is liable to take
an excursion to the boards for any count, up to the
“out.”
Guarding against Danger when Attacking.
A Left Jolt to Place the Deadly Right.
This is one of the most important factors in infighting, as it is, by the way, at long-range work.
In the former case, however, its virtues are all the
more salient, seeing that the in-fighter, if not very
skilled, courts a, deal of danger. It is therefore incumbent upon him, when about to get to close
quarters, to think as much of the possibilities of
receiving a nasty blow as of giving same. Some boxers there are who will attack an opponent
with but one set object, namely, to deliver a certain
fancied punch. Irrespective of a possibly dangerous
counter attack, these men will wade into an opponent
for the sole purpose of accomplishing that which
is in their mind.
The in-fighter’s thoughts should rest one the two
possibilities, and thus proceed on the necessary
caution and generalship. As will be seen in Fig. 7‘
my object was to get the right home to the pit of
the stomach.
The In-Fighter’s most Deadly Punch.
This is undoubtedly the most deadly in-fighting
punch possible, and means decisive victory if properly administered. In trying for this, however, it
must be remembered that a right may come along
and upset our plan. Therefore the left is brought
up to the opponent’s chin almost simultaneously
with the right drive to the mark. If successful the
left jolt should send your man’s head back, a movement which causes the muscles of his stomach to
relax. As will be seen in the illustration, the infighter leaves his face open somewhat for his opponent’s left. But admitting that the former has not
been successful with the said attack, the left may be
quickly brought round to cover or the head lowered
into the right shoulder, thus protecting the jaw.
This last movement would naturally cause the opponent’s left to land on the head and not the chin. Avoiding a Driving Right, Blocking the Left, and
Punching Stomach.
The opponent in this picture has lashed out with
the right, but the quick-witted in-fighter’s move is to
at once wade into his man and make the punch noneffectual, that is, presuming the said right hand
punch has been a straight drive to the chin, not a
hook or swing. The dodging of this delivery, by
quickly stepping in with the head slightly on one
side, has the effect of carrying your opponent’s right
clean out of its straight course, so to speak, and
making it shoot over the shoulder. The impetus
created by the sending forth of the said punch, and
the missing of same, is such that you are well into
close quarters before your man can regain his proper
striking equilibrium. Seeing himself thus forcibly
brought into close contact with the in-fighter, the
opponent will try to do a bit of short-range work
himself, and his right arm being momentarily out of
action, the possibilities are that he will attempt a
half-arm left hook to your now exposed
chin. You must watch this, and catch the
punch in the palm of your right hand, at the same
time driving the left to the stomach. The result of
this will invariably be to compel your opponent to
bring his right back to protect the body, in which
case the in-fighter’s left must get outside it in an
upward hook to the chin. This may lead to an
exchange at close quarters, during which the experienced in-fighter should again have things a good deal
his own way. Of course, there is no knowing
exactly what an opponent will do; but as I have
C 2 written elsewhere, the thorough digesting of this
work, followed by plenty of practice, should breed
the in-fighting instinct in most of my readers
enthusiastically bent upon acquiring same. Forcing an Opponent to the Ropes.
As I have said elsewhere, the most deadly infighting is served out to an opponent when he is on
the ropes. The point, therefore, is to get him there
as often as possible. Rugged boxers want a deal of
hustling, while those who depend mostly on
mobility, or fast footwork, are difficult to catch.
But even these must at some time or another find
themselves off their balance, or should I say that it
should be the in-fighter’s object to effect this
unsteadiness of foot? The hit, stand, and get-away
boxer may never bring about this desirable state of
affairs himself, for having scored with a punch, he
usually skips back to contemplate the effect of his
shot. This allows the opponent to regain any slight
overbalancing that the blow may have caused.
The in-fighter, on the contrary, must at once
follow up a hard punch, and by so doing create a
further unsteadiness in his opponent’s equipoise.
That is the moment to rush him, thus compelling
the retreating boxer to lose his left foothold and fall
back on the right. In the illustration, Fig. 9,
Madole’s full weight at that moment is on one leg, so
that he is forced to step back to avoid falling altogether. The in-fighter must not relax his forward
movement until he has his man well up against the
ropes. The impact thus created will force most boxers to bend their backs over the top cord, this
movement causing them, to leave their stomachs
open for the in-fighter’s demolishing work.
As in all other moves of the boxing game, the infighter must choose the psychological moment to
rush his opponent. If this does not present itself,
then he must use all his in-fighting strategy to make
it. For it must be remembered that one of the
greatest arts in boxing is creating favourable opportunities for oneself; that is to say, fusing every
honest means to compel an opponent to do just the
very thing that he himself would avoid. That is
where generalship comes in, that ever necessary
element in as all engagements wherein the “fortunes
of war” play an important part.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 03:15 AM
The Liver Punch.
After the stomach and heart, the liver is the most
vulnerable part of a boxer***8217;s body, that is, now that
the kidney punch has been barred. This measure
meant the taking away of a valuable point of vanstage for the in-fighter, inasmuch as the kidneys were
the easiest part of a man to punch, while incurring
the minimum of risk. Nevertheless, it is perhaps
as well for the boxing game, and boxers generally,
that these delicate regions were ruled out and
declared forbidden ground. This action was extremely unfavourable to the close range expert, but
it was necessary, if only from the fact of the deterioration of a boxer***8217;s health after having been severely
mauled by the kidney fiend. Personally never
made much use of the punch so that its exclusion
was but a small loss to me. In place I made a study of the liver punch,
which, although less painful, plays no small part in
an opponent***8217;s undoing. As with all in-fighting
punches, it is best delivered when your man is on
the ropes, but that does not necessarily imply that
it cannot be tried at any other moment, and failing
being sable to reach his man, the in-fighter must
await a right swing, or hook, from his opponent,
catch same on the neck, and close in. When doing
this, always keep your eye on the left that may come
up unpleasantly near your chin. The right should
be ready to stop this while your left is driven to the
liver. The blow is clearly illustrated in Fig. 10.(p.
33), and with a little practice should add yet one
more weapon to a boxer***8217;s arsenal. Should the opponent***8217;s left be slow in coming, then there is a
splendid opportunity to smash your right home to
his spleen, and thus complete the full object of your
incursion to close quarters. Few boxers can take
many punches on the liver or spleen without weakening. Fitzsimmons knew this, and made an art of
this particular blow, as well as the shift-punch to
the stomach. As he was perhaps the greatest
middle-weight who ever lived, these specialities of
his need no further recommendation.
Watch an Opponent***8217;s Legs, Knees, and Feet
when Hugging.
As it is mostly impossible, when at close quarters,
to watch an opponent***8217;s eyes (it being advisable to
keep the head down), my advice is, watch his feet.
These are often indicative of a boxer***8217;s intention, for the least forward movement means that he is himself
trying to get closer in for short-range work. If, on
the contrary, his feet show a tendancy to retreat,
if then you may rest assured that your opponent does
not fancy close exchanges. Should the position, as
shown in Fig. 11 (p. 37), be unfavourable to effectual
body pasting, then the in-fighter may either allow
his man to step away,or do so himself, in the hope
of securing a more suitable opening for his particular
talents.
Apart from that, it is always interesting to know
the exact effect of a punch on an opponent, and this
is possible by an glance at his legs and knees.
These parts seem to be in strange sympathy with
the upper part of a man***8217;s body, and will at once by
their firmness, or relaxation, communicate to the
experienced eye the amount of damage done by a
blow. Thus it is that we hear of a boxer ***8220;going
groggy at the knees,***8221; or that his ***8220;legs shook***8221; after
a certain punch. If such an effect is produced by a
long-range delivery it is obvious to the giver, for the
receiver of the punch will insensibly ***8220;give himself
away.***8221;
But in the case of a ***8220;knee-bending***8221; punch at
close quarters, what indication can the in-fighter
have that the blow has been effectual, save by a
glance at his opponent***8217;s legs? The first symptoms
will be, that a boxer so ***8220;plugged***8221; brings his whole
weight to bear on you. Having gleaned so much,
and lowered yourself to allow the full weight of your
opponent***8217;s body to fall on his legs, your suspicions
will be either verified or negatived. Feigning ***8220;Grogginess.***8221;
There are boxers who will bring their histrionic
talents to bear on a contest and feign ***8220;grogginess,***8221;
in the hope of drawing you into a trap. Now,
although this is more successful when practised while
out-fighting, such ruses are not infrequent at close
quarters. In the case of an opponent showing signs
of distress, either feigned or real, it is the in-fighter***8217;s
duty to immediately break clear, quickly survey the
situation, and either keep away or drive the final
punches home at a long or short range, according
to his judgment.
Ducking an Opponent***8217;s Right Swing, Stepping in with
Right Upper-cut, and Driving Left to the Stomach.
The Eyes and the-Brain
This is an exceedingly pretty part of the in-fighting art; one, however, that should be well mastered
before taking its possible risks. As the head has-to
play the master part of ducking the right swing, a
deal of practice is necessary to know exactly when
and how far the move is practicable. As in all
phases of the Noble Art, the eye must accustom itself
to possibilities, just as the brain must respond at
once to the visual appreciation of danger or of openings for attack. The eyes are the outposts of the
mind, so to speak, the transmission of its observations being carried with momentary rapidity to the
centre of action***8212;or headquarters.
Quick-wittedness in boxing may be developed by
concentration during one's boxing, that is, a boxer
must not for a single instant during a contest let his imagination wander from his work. The same
recommendation applies to the boxer when in the
gymnasium, for the lack of interest in one***8217;s practice
brings on laxity of mind at all times.
The beginner, especially, must realise that the
boxing game is fulls of traps and surprises, that the
eye must be trained to see these, and that the brain
must work conjunctively in surmounting difficulties.
It is necessary to impress these things firmly on
the minds of those about to attempt the movement
of Fig. 12. Having well reasoned out the possibilities of danger that an untimely or badly-executed
lowering of the head may mean, let the reader practise it as often as possible, until the ducking becomes
almost instinctive. Rome was not built in a day
and it may take some time before this phase, as all
others, by the way, is mastered sufficiently to be
tried with safety during a real contest.
Once acquired, it is as simple as it is effectual, and
means a big jump toward victory, if not the final
step to that desirable end.
The missing of a right swing by an opponent
usually means the slight losing of his equilibrium.
This fact prevents him from bringing his left into
motion in time to avoid the in-fighter***8217;s close-quarter
upper-cut. Having ducked his right, the natural
overbalancing of his body brings his chin into a
direct upward line for the successful placing of your
punch, as shown in the illustration. Before he can
recover, the left may be easily driven to the stomach,
the whole of which will lead to your man clinching,
therefore the coming in for more short-range punish ment. As will be readily observed, the successful
issue of all this depends entirely upon the proper
ducking of your opponent***8217;s right, swing at the
psychological moment. The long-range boxer often
ducks the same punch, but steps back in doing so
The in-fighter differs in that he must lower his head
in a forward movement, thus preparing himself for
the right upper-cut to the jaw and left body,
deliveries. A close study of the picture depicting
this phase will convince anybody of its efficacy.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 03:18 AM
The Liver Punch.
After the stomach and heart, the liver is the most
vulnerable part of a boxer’s body, that is, now that
the kidney punch has been barred. This measure
meant the taking away of a valuable point of vanstage for the in-fighter, inasmuch as the kidneys were
the easiest part of a man to punch, while incurring
the minimum of risk. Nevertheless, it is perhaps
as well for the boxing game, and boxers generally,
that these delicate regions were ruled out and
declared forbidden ground. This action was extremely unfavourable to the close range expert, but
it was necessary, if only from the fact of the deterioration of a boxer’s health after having been severely
mauled by the kidney fiend. Personally never
made much use of the punch so that its exclusion
was but a small loss to me. In place I made a study of the liver punch,
which, although less painful, plays no small part in
an opponent’s undoing. As with all in-fighting
punches, it is best delivered when your man is on
the ropes, but that does not necessarily imply that
it cannot be tried at any other moment, and failing
being sable to reach his man, the in-fighter must
await a right swing, or hook, from his opponent,
catch same on the neck, and close in. When doing
this, always keep your eye on the left that may come
up unpleasantly near your chin. The right should
be ready to stop this while your left is driven to the
liver. The blow is clearly illustrated in Fig. 10.(p.
33), and with a little practice should add yet one
more weapon to a boxer’s arsenal. Should the opponent’s left be slow in coming, then there is a
splendid opportunity to smash your right home to
his spleen, and thus complete the full object of your
incursion to close quarters. Few boxers can take
many punches on the liver or spleen without weakening. Fitzsimmons knew this, and made an art of
this particular blow, as well as the shift-punch to
the stomach. As he was perhaps the greatest
middle-weight who ever lived, these specialities of
his need no further recommendation.
Watch an Opponent’s Legs, Knees, and Feet
when Hugging.
As it is mostly impossible, when at close quarters,
to watch an opponent’s eyes (it being advisable to
keep the head down), my advice is, watch his feet.
These are often indicative of a boxer’s intention, for the least forward movement means that he is himself
trying to get closer in for short-range work. If, on
the contrary, his feet show a tendancy to retreat,
if then you may rest assured that your opponent does
not fancy close exchanges. Should the position, as
shown in Fig. 11 (p. 37), be unfavourable to effectual
body pasting, then the in-fighter may either allow
his man to step away,or do so himself, in the hope
of securing a more suitable opening for his particular
talents.
Apart from that, it is always interesting to know
the exact effect of a punch on an opponent, and this
is possible by an glance at his legs and knees.
These parts seem to be in strange sympathy with
the upper part of a man’s body, and will at once by
their firmness, or relaxation, communicate to the
experienced eye the amount of damage done by a
blow. Thus it is that we hear of a boxer “going
groggy at the knees,” or that his “legs shook” after
a certain punch. If such an effect is produced by a
long-range delivery it is obvious to the giver, for the
receiver of the punch will insensibly “give himself
away.”
But in the case of a “knee-bending” punch at
close quarters, what indication can the in-fighter
have that the blow has been effectual, save by a
glance at his opponent’s legs? The first symptoms
will be, that a boxer so “plugged” brings his whole
weight to bear on you. Having gleaned so much,
and lowered yourself to allow the full weight of your
opponent’s body to fall on his legs, your suspicions
will be either verified or negatived. Feigning “Grogginess.”
There are boxers who will bring their histrionic
talents to bear on a contest and feign “grogginess,”
in the hope of drawing you into a trap. Now,
although this is more successful when practised while
out-fighting, such ruses are not infrequent at close
quarters. In the case of an opponent showing signs
of distress, either feigned or real, it is the in-fighter’s
duty to immediately break clear, quickly survey the
situation, and either keep away or drive the final
punches home at a long or short range, according
to his judgment.
Ducking an Opponent’s Right Swing, Stepping in with
Right Upper-cut, and Driving Left to the Stomach.
The Eyes and the-Brain
This is an exceedingly pretty part of the in-fighting art; one, however, that should be well mastered
before taking its possible risks. As the head has-to
play the master part of ducking the right swing, a
deal of practice is necessary to know exactly when
and how far the move is practicable. As in all
phases of the Noble Art, the eye must accustom itself
to possibilities, just as the brain must respond at
once to the visual appreciation of danger or of openings for attack. The eyes are the outposts of the
mind, so to speak, the transmission of its observations being carried with momentary rapidity to the
centre of action—or headquarters.
Quick-wittedness in boxing may be developed by
concentration during one's boxing, that is, a boxer
must not for a single instant during a contest let his imagination wander from his work. The same
recommendation applies to the boxer when in the
gymnasium, for the lack of interest in one’s practice
brings on laxity of mind at all times.
The beginner, especially, must realise that the
boxing game is fulls of traps and surprises, that the
eye must be trained to see these, and that the brain
must work conjunctively in surmounting difficulties.
It is necessary to impress these things firmly on
the minds of those about to attempt the movement
of Fig. 12. Having well reasoned out the possibilities of danger that an untimely or badly-executed
lowering of the head may mean, let the reader practise it as often as possible, until the ducking becomes
almost instinctive. Rome was not built in a day
and it may take some time before this phase, as all
others, by the way, is mastered sufficiently to be
tried with safety during a real contest.
Once acquired, it is as simple as it is effectual, and
means a big jump toward victory, if not the final
step to that desirable end.
The missing of a right swing by an opponent
usually means the slight losing of his equilibrium.
This fact prevents him from bringing his left into
motion in time to avoid the in-fighter’s close-quarter
upper-cut. Having ducked his right, the natural
overbalancing of his body brings his chin into a
direct upward line for the successful placing of your
punch, as shown in the illustration. Before he can
recover, the left may be easily driven to the stomach,
the whole of which will lead to your man clinching,
therefore the coming in for more short-range punish ment. As will be readily observed, the successful
issue of all this depends entirely upon the proper
ducking of your opponent’s right, swing at the
psychological moment. The long-range boxer often
ducks the same punch, but steps back in doing so
The in-fighter differs in that he must lower his head
in a forward movement, thus preparing himself for
the right upper-cut to the jaw and left body,
deliveries. A close study of the picture depicting
this phase will convince anybody of its efficacy.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 06:48 AM
Right Hook to the Jaw.
A Remedy for the Pushing Boxer.
Although this punch may be given at all kinds of
favourable moments, it should never be missed with
the opponent who tries to push you away. The man
who has suffered a good deal of body punishment
from the in-fighter naturally does all he can to avoid
the latter***8217;s continual ***8220;boring in,***8221; for, above all
things, the c1ose-range boxer must be on top of his
man most of the time. The gamest of boxers get disheartened at these perpetual onslaughts, and seek
every possible means of either keeping the in-fighter
at a safe distance or of pushing him away when
danger threatens.
Having, however, got to within easy striking
distance, you will at times find your opponent
making use of his hands to push you away. He is
not holding, but just offering a desperate resistance
to your advance. Dangerous as this proceeding
is, numerous boxers will employ it in sheer desperation or pique. Of course, it is but asking for trouble, which should go out to them in the shape of a right
half-arm hook to the jaw, the simplest shot in theworld. This opportunity occurs but rarely, but if,
it does, as it must do in the course of a contest, then
it is as well to be prepared for it, and not gasp at the
simplicity of the punch.
When a Punch looks Easy.
***8220;Asking***8221; for a punch as it were is more often
than not to avoid getting it, for it happens that the in
cutest of boxers will shy at the obviously easy punch,
in the belief that it is but a trap. So few really easy
things do occur during a battle, that perhaps boxers
are wise in avoiding hidden pitfalls. In the case of
the opponent who pushes you away, however, there
is absolutely no reason why the right hook, as shown
in the illustration, should not find a landing stage on
that man***8217;s jaw.
Getting inside a Left Lead, Stopping the Right, and
getting home on the Heart.
Preconceived Attacks.
As the left lead is the most conspicuous punch to
deal with, the in-fighter must perforce use all his
intelligence to counteract its numerous visitations.
Blocking same with the right, ducking, stepping
back, countering and crossing, are all possible
replies, but the in-fighter has yet one more move in
his curriculum. The feature of a punch should
always be but the object of a preconceived force line;
that is to say, that a blow should invariably be
stopped in a manner that leads to a possible opening
for a return (or counter) punch or punches. I might liken this to the good billiard player, who not only
plays for the particular shot on the table, but for
others to follow. His mind is always centred on the
play to come, and he manipulates the balls accordingly. So it should be with the boxer. In either
delivering or stopping a punch, he should have
ulterior motives in his thoughts. Although an opponent may prevent these from materialising, their
realisation will come sooner or later, for a conscientious boxer***8217;s maxim should always be A: ***8220;Try, try
again!***8221; Anyhow, in the case of the phase depicted
in Fig. 14, the defensive object is but subservient to
the offensive.
Having forced himself to close quarters, the infighter is here faced with the possible danger of a
left to the face and right to the body. His object,
as must always be the case, is naturally to administer
punishment, the while he himself modifies the possibilities of receiving same.
Having slightly side-stepped the left, allowing it
to brush past the ear, the in-fighter holds his opponent***8217;s right in check, the while he himself smashes
his own right to the heart. In this case, both the
defensive (or natural law) has succeeded, as well as
the preconceived plan of attack.
Preconception in Boxing.
Unfortunately, preconception in boxing is very
limited, for one never quite knows what an opponent
will do. Billiard players may plan a dozen shots
ahead, but the boxer is lucky if he can occasionally
bring off such advantages as the one described in
this chapter. There, are moments, however, when an opponent is made to fall into certain trouble
in spite of himself. That is where the more experienced boxer gets the better of another.
Reconnoitring when at Close Quarters.
Although having written in a previous chapter
that it is rarely possible to use the eyes for ***8220;surveying***8221; purposes while in close quarters, occasions do
arise when this reconnoitring is of much advantage,
that is, when presuming that the opportunity for so
doing be given by an opponent.
Having proceeded into a lock-clinch, that is, when
attack on either side seems hopeless, the moment is
opportune for glancing at your man***8217;s jaw, the object
being to see if it is in a position for a right jolt. If
such be the case, then is the time to work the right
gradually into a position for executing your project.
Care must be taken that your own right be well
over your opponent***8217;s left, thus holding it in check.
Otherwise, this peep from cover may prove costly.
Your man***8217;s right must also be held in such a
manner as to prevent any action on its part.
If, when rushing to close quarters, the in-fighter***8217;s
position is not as shown in Fig. 15, then he must so
man***339;uvre his arms and legs as to bring it about.
Once accomp1ished, he can risk the above-mentioned
***8220;survey***8221; in the hope of finding the jaw exposed for
attack. If this proves to be as hoped, then is the
in-fighter***8217;s moment to strike, and strike quickly.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 06:52 AM
Placing the Right-Arm Jolt.
Having we1l worked his right to the inside of his
man***8217;s left, and holding it in check as shown in Fig. 15, the possibility of receiving a left is thus prevented. It now remains for the in-fighter to push
his opponent back; by a jerk on his biceps, the
brusque movement startling him. This ruse is
necessary to momentarily trouble his mind as to the
meaning of such a strange practice. As the said
pushing is undertaken without precisely holding the
biceps, there is a little fear of the referee separating
the combatants before the in-fighter has delivered his
contemplated jolt-punch under the chin. As the
effect of this blow is calculated to send the receiver***8217;s
head back, thus disturbing his presence of mind,
there should arise an opportunity to draw the left
away from the opponent***8217;s right biceps and hook
same to the body. This punch, however, is quite
supplementary, and only possible if circumstances
will allow, for the opponent will possibly catch hold
of your left arm in an endeavour to save himself
from reeling backward as the result of the objective
punch, i.e., a jolt under the chin. This last-named
is a most damaging blow if delivered with something
of a lift from the shoulder, that is to say, it should
carry the full force that would be employed in lifting
a heavy dumb-bell.
The Jab.
It must not be confounded with the jab, which is
but a rap to the face or body, carrying but trivial
consequences. The expression ***8220;jabbing a man***8217;s
head off," although often used by writers, is sometimes an inaccurate description of a series after series
of half-arm left flicks. Although the process may be called jabbing, the jab, in its relation to the punch, is
difficult to define accurately. In any case it seems
to me that decisive victories are seldom brought
about by the aid of this mysterious ***8220;JAB.***8221; I have
read reports of contests in which the critic referred
to a boxer as ***8220;repeatedly stabbing an opponent with
the left,***8221; etc. This stab must be some relation***8212;a
few times removed perhaps***8212;to the jab. ***8220;Jab***8221;
appears to be the saving word of many an inexperienced youthful writer on boxing matters, which he
applies to any or all doubtful punches. This must
not be taken as a reflection on boxing writers proper,
whom I have always found competent and just, but
to the ambitious office-boy, who, while for the, first
time describing a contest, will bring in every word of
the pugilistic vocabulary irrespective of its proper
place. These are, happily, rare occurrences.
Beating an Opponent by Punching his Gloved
Hands or Arms.
Although perhaps not strictly orthodox, the process of numbing an opponent***8217;s arms, by punching
him thereon, is often a road to victory. As most
people are acquainted with the crippling effects of a
blow, on the biceps, it is but necessary for me to
recall the fact that it temporarily numbs the entire
arm, rendering same at least momentarily helpless.
A deal or damage may be done in this manner,
especia1ly as the punches are delivered when the
opponent least expects them.
The man who keeps his left forearm well over his
stomach is an easy target for the arm-punch. There are several ways of administering this, i.e., either by
driving your right on to your opponent***8217;s gloved fist,
which at the time is protecting the ***8220;mark***8221; (pit of
the stomach), or by a smashing blow on his biceps.
In the first instance the impact of the punch, if
delivered with force, should cause your opponent***8217;s
own fist to sink into his stomach, thus perhaps
***8220;knocking himself out,***8221; so to speak. In any case,
such a delivery can but be advantageous to the one
who gets it well home, and distinctly uncomfortable
for the other fellow. I have seen other boxers do
this with varying effect. It is worth trying when
opportunity calls.
Punching the Biceps
The punch on the biceps is equally alarming to an
opponent, for the result is sometimes of a no less
painful nature than the above mentioned stomach
arm-punch.
The continual punching of a man***8217;s upper arm
must, sooner or later, bring on a state of paralysis.
As the result of such maulings a boxer will often
be forced to retire, actually believing that his arm is
broken. A blow on what is known as the ***8220;funny
bone***8221;***8212;which, by the way, is not a bone at all, but
a nerve***8212;produces much the same effect. But as the
particular spot in that case is difficult to find, and
the seeking for it may mean the wasting of many
punches, the in-fighter should turn his attention to
the biceps. The rule, therefore, is, that when no
other part of an opponent***8217;s body is attackable go for
his arms. Knocking a Man out by Punching his Gloved Fist.
I have knocked a man out who was covering his
jaw by punching the gloved hand that was shielding
that vulnerable point. Of course, my opponent was
so unprepared for such an attack, and felt himself so
secure, that he did not even attempt to counter the
blow. He tried it on others later***8212;with good
results.
Many pugilistic prudes will no doubt look upon
this arm-punching as, rather sharp practice, many
degrees removed from what; these gentlemen would
call the ***8220;clean style,***8221; but I maintain that a boxer***8217;s
chief aim while in the ring is to beat his opponent.
So long as he does this honestly, his manner of
arriving at that desirable end surely concerns him
alone.
Old-Fashioned Methods.
There are some people who abhor any but what
are known as ***8220;old-fashioned***8221; methods, but boxing,
like all things, has gone ahead since those days, and
the sooner young boxers realise this, the sooner will
they secure world honours. I maintain that infighting is an all too-neglected art, one full of new
interests, and not ugly to watch***8212;when understood.
The art of self-defence surely implies the power
and means to defend oneself at all times. How can a
boxer do full credit to this doctrine and himself, if
only partially armed for it?
In-fighting is a formidable adjunct to the integral
art of boxing.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 06:52 AM
Placing the Right-Arm Jolt.
Having we1l worked his right to the inside of his
man’s left, and holding it in check as shown in Fig. 15, the possibility of receiving a left is thus prevented. It now remains for the in-fighter to push
his opponent back; by a jerk on his biceps, the
brusque movement startling him. This ruse is
necessary to momentarily trouble his mind as to the
meaning of such a strange practice. As the said
pushing is undertaken without precisely holding the
biceps, there is a little fear of the referee separating
the combatants before the in-fighter has delivered his
contemplated jolt-punch under the chin. As the
effect of this blow is calculated to send the receiver’s
head back, thus disturbing his presence of mind,
there should arise an opportunity to draw the left
away from the opponent’s right biceps and hook
same to the body. This punch, however, is quite
supplementary, and only possible if circumstances
will allow, for the opponent will possibly catch hold
of your left arm in an endeavour to save himself
from reeling backward as the result of the objective
punch, i.e., a jolt under the chin. This last-named
is a most damaging blow if delivered with something
of a lift from the shoulder, that is to say, it should
carry the full force that would be employed in lifting
a heavy dumb-bell.
The Jab.
It must not be confounded with the jab, which is
but a rap to the face or body, carrying but trivial
consequences. The expression “jabbing a man’s
head off," although often used by writers, is sometimes an inaccurate description of a series after series
of half-arm left flicks. Although the process may be called jabbing, the jab, in its relation to the punch, is
difficult to define accurately. In any case it seems
to me that decisive victories are seldom brought
about by the aid of this mysterious “JAB.” I have
read reports of contests in which the critic referred
to a boxer as “repeatedly stabbing an opponent with
the left,” etc. This stab must be some relation—a
few times removed perhaps—to the jab. “Jab”
appears to be the saving word of many an inexperienced youthful writer on boxing matters, which he
applies to any or all doubtful punches. This must
not be taken as a reflection on boxing writers proper,
whom I have always found competent and just, but
to the ambitious office-boy, who, while for the, first
time describing a contest, will bring in every word of
the pugilistic vocabulary irrespective of its proper
place. These are, happily, rare occurrences.
Beating an Opponent by Punching his Gloved
Hands or Arms.
Although perhaps not strictly orthodox, the process of numbing an opponent’s arms, by punching
him thereon, is often a road to victory. As most
people are acquainted with the crippling effects of a
blow, on the biceps, it is but necessary for me to
recall the fact that it temporarily numbs the entire
arm, rendering same at least momentarily helpless.
A deal or damage may be done in this manner,
especia1ly as the punches are delivered when the
opponent least expects them.
The man who keeps his left forearm well over his
stomach is an easy target for the arm-punch. There are several ways of administering this, i.e., either by
driving your right on to your opponent’s gloved fist,
which at the time is protecting the “mark” (pit of
the stomach), or by a smashing blow on his biceps.
In the first instance the impact of the punch, if
delivered with force, should cause your opponent’s
own fist to sink into his stomach, thus perhaps
“knocking himself out,” so to speak. In any case,
such a delivery can but be advantageous to the one
who gets it well home, and distinctly uncomfortable
for the other fellow. I have seen other boxers do
this with varying effect. It is worth trying when
opportunity calls.
Punching the Biceps
The punch on the biceps is equally alarming to an
opponent, for the result is sometimes of a no less
painful nature than the above mentioned stomach
arm-punch.
The continual punching of a man’s upper arm
must, sooner or later, bring on a state of paralysis.
As the result of such maulings a boxer will often
be forced to retire, actually believing that his arm is
broken. A blow on what is known as the “funny
bone”—which, by the way, is not a bone at all, but
a nerve—produces much the same effect. But as the
particular spot in that case is difficult to find, and
the seeking for it may mean the wasting of many
punches, the in-fighter should turn his attention to
the biceps. The rule, therefore, is, that when no
other part of an opponent’s body is attackable go for
his arms. Knocking a Man out by Punching his Gloved Fist.
I have knocked a man out who was covering his
jaw by punching the gloved hand that was shielding
that vulnerable point. Of course, my opponent was
so unprepared for such an attack, and felt himself so
secure, that he did not even attempt to counter the
blow. He tried it on others later—with good
results.
Many pugilistic prudes will no doubt look upon
this arm-punching as, rather sharp practice, many
degrees removed from what; these gentlemen would
call the “clean style,” but I maintain that a boxer’s
chief aim while in the ring is to beat his opponent.
So long as he does this honestly, his manner of
arriving at that desirable end surely concerns him
alone.
Old-Fashioned Methods.
There are some people who abhor any but what
are known as “old-fashioned” methods, but boxing,
like all things, has gone ahead since those days, and
the sooner young boxers realise this, the sooner will
they secure world honours. I maintain that infighting is an all too-neglected art, one full of new
interests, and not ugly to watch—when understood.
The art of self-defence surely implies the power
and means to defend oneself at all times. How can a
boxer do full credit to this doctrine and himself, if
only partially armed for it?
In-fighting is a formidable adjunct to the integral
art of boxing.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 06:57 AM
Breaking an Opponent***8217;s Arms apart tn Facilitate
an Attack.
This requires a deal of dexterity and quickness of
eye, for in the event of missing the movement there
is danger of taking a right or left to the jaw.
A good defensive out-fighter is often difficult to
***8220;get at.***8221; He will even creep up to the in-fighter,
the while he keeps a protective guard, and hook a
punch before the latter can stop it.
Having studied this particular tendency in an
opponent, the thing is to find a means whereby he
may be made to pay for his temerity.
Having allowed him to get near enough, it is
necessary to suddenly penetrate inside his guard,
and, as shown in the picture of Fig. 18, violently
thrust his arms aside. If this be done sharply, and
the movement executed with force, the shock will
unbalance your opponent***8217;s mind and legs, causing
an opening for a right half-arm upper-cut to the
chin. This particular breaking apart of an opponent***8217;s arm is wonderfully efficacious, but the opportunities for its accomplishment are rare, although
presenting themselves occasionally during a contest.
I should not advise a boxer to attempt it until he has
familiarised himself with the move, and feels himself
capable of taking a chance now and then; for in
boxing, as in most things, one must often take risks
to bring off big deals.
Some In-Fighting Phases taken from Actual Contests.
Being in possession of a few pictures of the various
contests that I have engaged in during my stay in Paris, I thought that these might prove interesting,
depicting as they do various phases of the in-fighting
art. As they represent actual facts, occurring
during real combat, no better idea could be given of
the efficacy of close-quarter boxing; for even while
posing for the numerous photos in this book, there
necessarily exists an artificial atmosphere of selfconsciousness.
Punching the Opponent who Holds.
As will be seen in the accompanying picture of
my contest with Georges Carpentier at Dieppe, the
Frenchman has my right in chancery, thus preventing my using it either to the body or for hooking
to the jaw.
In such an event, the in-fighter must at once draw
his left arm well back from obstruction, and use
same to the stomach. The referee is here seen stepping up to separate us, but as I had one arm free,
and it was Carpentier who was holding me, no break
should have been enforced until we were both holding. The rule of in-fighting is that a man may
punch an opponent so long as the former has one or
both hands available. In this instance my left arm
was free, and although I cannot remember whether
I was allowed to use it***8212;which is doubtful seeing
the referee***8217;s close proximity***8212;I evidently was rightly
about to do so. This reminds me that the in-fighter
is a great deal at the mercy of the third man in a
ring, for the breaking of two boxers, when their position does not exactly call for the order, is favouring
(unwittingly perhaps) the long-range boxer. However, we have to take the good with the bad in boxing, and make the best of our time when close
up, bringing in-fighting experience to bear detrimentally on an opponent.
When to Hold an Opponent and thus Call for
the Break.
It occasionally happens during a contest that your
opponent so holds as to negative any form of
effective attack. Some boxers will pummel the
back, shoulders, and other exposed. but invulnerable
parts, and in the process do themselves more harm
than good. Every punch given by the in-fighter
should have an object, and that object should be: the
gradual or immediate beating of a man. Punches
on the shoulder or back are so much waste of energy;
they are taken little notice of by the opponent, and
still less by judges and referees. Therefore the
better plan, in the event of being unable to land
an efficient punch, is to bring about a clinch by
also holding one***8217;s opponent, thus calling the break.
As will be seen in this particular phase of my contest with Carpentier (Fig. 20) he is holding me in
such a mnaner, with his head so low, as to leave
but his back and kidneys exposed. As the latter
must not be touched, this leaves the in-fighter but
***8220;Hobson***8217;s choice***8221; of bringing about a speedy
separation. In doing this I hugged the French
champion in such a manner that he himself was so
locked as to prevent him suddenly springing some
surprise on me.
Hooking the Right while the Left is being Held.
The out-fighter***8217;s favourite trick is to hold one of
his opponents arms under his own, thus temporarily silencing one gun, so to speak. In the course of my
contest with Marcel Moreau at Aix-les-Bains, the
latter frequently had recourse to this (see Fig. 21)
mode of defence, which is invariably a sure sign that
a man is not particularly keen on close-range
exchanges. The boxer addicted to that practice
will, in almost every case, simultaneously seek to
get hold of your other arm. While the opponent
is thus occupied it should be the in-fighter***8217;s plan to
keep his free arm from being also put out of action,
and, as in the present case, hook same to the jaw.
The man who holds desperately is not inclined to
mix matters at close quarters, his mind being far
too occupied with defensive precautions.
Almost the same thing occurs in the phase shown
in Fig. 22, except that Moreau has grasped my left
arm, as it was making for his stomach, the while I
am about to hook him with the right. Judging by his
tactics, it was soon apparent to me that I had to
deal with a boxer who did not relish in-fighting.
My mind being thus fixed, I bored in all the more
and won in four rounds.
Apart from that, I found Moreau to be one of the
hardest-hitting boxers I have met in my career.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 06:57 AM
Breaking an Opponent’s Arms apart tn Facilitate
an Attack.
This requires a deal of dexterity and quickness of
eye, for in the event of missing the movement there
is danger of taking a right or left to the jaw.
A good defensive out-fighter is often difficult to
“get at.” He will even creep up to the in-fighter,
the while he keeps a protective guard, and hook a
punch before the latter can stop it.
Having studied this particular tendency in an
opponent, the thing is to find a means whereby he
may be made to pay for his temerity.
Having allowed him to get near enough, it is
necessary to suddenly penetrate inside his guard,
and, as shown in the picture of Fig. 18, violently
thrust his arms aside. If this be done sharply, and
the movement executed with force, the shock will
unbalance your opponent’s mind and legs, causing
an opening for a right half-arm upper-cut to the
chin. This particular breaking apart of an opponent’s arm is wonderfully efficacious, but the opportunities for its accomplishment are rare, although
presenting themselves occasionally during a contest.
I should not advise a boxer to attempt it until he has
familiarised himself with the move, and feels himself
capable of taking a chance now and then; for in
boxing, as in most things, one must often take risks
to bring off big deals.
Some In-Fighting Phases taken from Actual Contests.
Being in possession of a few pictures of the various
contests that I have engaged in during my stay in Paris, I thought that these might prove interesting,
depicting as they do various phases of the in-fighting
art. As they represent actual facts, occurring
during real combat, no better idea could be given of
the efficacy of close-quarter boxing; for even while
posing for the numerous photos in this book, there
necessarily exists an artificial atmosphere of selfconsciousness.
Punching the Opponent who Holds.
As will be seen in the accompanying picture of
my contest with Georges Carpentier at Dieppe, the
Frenchman has my right in chancery, thus preventing my using it either to the body or for hooking
to the jaw.
In such an event, the in-fighter must at once draw
his left arm well back from obstruction, and use
same to the stomach. The referee is here seen stepping up to separate us, but as I had one arm free,
and it was Carpentier who was holding me, no break
should have been enforced until we were both holding. The rule of in-fighting is that a man may
punch an opponent so long as the former has one or
both hands available. In this instance my left arm
was free, and although I cannot remember whether
I was allowed to use it—which is doubtful seeing
the referee’s close proximity—I evidently was rightly
about to do so. This reminds me that the in-fighter
is a great deal at the mercy of the third man in a
ring, for the breaking of two boxers, when their position does not exactly call for the order, is favouring
(unwittingly perhaps) the long-range boxer. However, we have to take the good with the bad in boxing, and make the best of our time when close
up, bringing in-fighting experience to bear detrimentally on an opponent.
When to Hold an Opponent and thus Call for
the Break.
It occasionally happens during a contest that your
opponent so holds as to negative any form of
effective attack. Some boxers will pummel the
back, shoulders, and other exposed. but invulnerable
parts, and in the process do themselves more harm
than good. Every punch given by the in-fighter
should have an object, and that object should be: the
gradual or immediate beating of a man. Punches
on the shoulder or back are so much waste of energy;
they are taken little notice of by the opponent, and
still less by judges and referees. Therefore the
better plan, in the event of being unable to land
an efficient punch, is to bring about a clinch by
also holding one’s opponent, thus calling the break.
As will be seen in this particular phase of my contest with Carpentier (Fig. 20) he is holding me in
such a mnaner, with his head so low, as to leave
but his back and kidneys exposed. As the latter
must not be touched, this leaves the in-fighter but
“Hobson’s choice” of bringing about a speedy
separation. In doing this I hugged the French
champion in such a manner that he himself was so
locked as to prevent him suddenly springing some
surprise on me.
Hooking the Right while the Left is being Held.
The out-fighter’s favourite trick is to hold one of
his opponents arms under his own, thus temporarily silencing one gun, so to speak. In the course of my
contest with Marcel Moreau at Aix-les-Bains, the
latter frequently had recourse to this (see Fig. 21)
mode of defence, which is invariably a sure sign that
a man is not particularly keen on close-range
exchanges. The boxer addicted to that practice
will, in almost every case, simultaneously seek to
get hold of your other arm. While the opponent
is thus occupied it should be the in-fighter’s plan to
keep his free arm from being also put out of action,
and, as in the present case, hook same to the jaw.
The man who holds desperately is not inclined to
mix matters at close quarters, his mind being far
too occupied with defensive precautions.
Almost the same thing occurs in the phase shown
in Fig. 22, except that Moreau has grasped my left
arm, as it was making for his stomach, the while I
am about to hook him with the right. Judging by his
tactics, it was soon apparent to me that I had to
deal with a boxer who did not relish in-fighting.
My mind being thus fixed, I bored in all the more
and won in four rounds.
Apart from that, I found Moreau to be one of the
hardest-hitting boxers I have met in my career.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 07:00 AM
My Contest with Billy Papke.
Being an excellent in-fighter himself, I had more
difficulty with Papke. The clashing of the identical
styles means much that would not occur when
opposed to a man possessed of but the out-fighting
art. Papke is equally clever at both styles, and
this fact made my battle with him all the more
bitter and interesting. Although we both tried to knock each other out in a reckless first round, I
found that it was more prudent to out-general him
in in-fighting, and gradually reduce him to nought.
This I accomplished successfully, mostly by continued and direct attacks to his body, occasionally
varied by some long-range straight lefts and right
swings to the jaw.
As I said in the beginning of this book, my plan
was to force him as often as possible to the ropes
(see Fig. 23) and while there worry him, thereby
affecting his morale. I soon realised that he was
gradually giving way under the force of these onslaughts, so repeated them as often as possible. In
the picture the referee has just ordered the ***8220;break,***8221;
and it will be noticed that I am carrying out the
order in the safest manner possible, as hereafter
described.
Breaking away Safely.
Many a man has been beaten through sheer carelessness while breaking away from a clinch after
close-work fighting. A boxer should always live up
to the belief that so long as an opponent is in the
ring he is dangerous; but in few cases is this fact
more potential than when breaking away. So long
as both men are free either can punch, and a quickfooted opponent may smash a blow home before you
have had time to regain your protective guard.
It is therefore advisable to keep a sharp eye on an
adversary***8217;s eyes and arms when leaving a clinch, at
the same time working your own so that he cannot
possibly catch you ***8220;on the hop,***8221; so to speak. The
experienced in-fighter will, therefore, get well insidehis opponent***8217;s arms and hold same in check in the
manner shown in the illustration. The man thus
placed can neither use his right nor left with any
degree of success, if at all. There is a great deal in
this, for having finally stepped clear, it gives one
time to regain one***8217;s natural guard, or at once rush
the opponent, according to the situation created by
the said break. Action must then rest on the existing possibilities, for if the opponent has also assumed
a safe guard the in-fighter must be guided by his
next move.
Holding an Arm in Chancery.
As was the case with Marcel Moreau (see Fig-21),
Billy Papke frequently lent himself to the chancery
trick, thereby checking my left arm. In Fig. 24
Papke is seen holding, just after- having tried to hook
his left to the jaw. By sending my head down on
his shoulder, the punch landed on the neck. This
movement allowed me not only to see that the body
was exposed to a punch with my right, but facilitated my getting it there. It must have been a
pretty hard one, too, for Papke***8217;s legs gave the signal
of distress mentioned elsewhere. Almost the same
thing occurs in the following picture, Papke holding
my left arm in submission while I used my right on
his body.
Falling on to a Stomach Punch.
This was a rarer phase of my contest with Papke,
one which occurs but seldom. The in-fighter must
however, be awake for all emergencies and have thenecessary remedy handy. In trying a terrific right
swing, which he missed, owing to my having ducked
same, Papke fell clean on to a right punch to the
stomach, supplemented by a left to the liver. As
this happened toward the end of the bout, when my
opponent was already well on the road to defeat, it
must have proved pretty disastrous. But all this
does not alter the fact that I took a good many hard
punches myself during those fourteen and a quarter
rounds; they, however, meant my securing the
middle-weight championship of the world.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 07:12 AM
Training. As a boxer’s training methods seem to interest
most people, I should like to say a few words on that
particular subject.
Apart from as much practice as possible in the
gymnasium in the hope of either perfecting already
acquired knowledge, and gleaning more, a boxer’s
training should depend a great deal upon his own
temperament. Apart from the stereotyped, irksome,
but necessary methods of taking off weight, I think
that some boxers work too hard. A good trainer
should at once be able to gauge his man’s working
capacity, and not unduly tax same. Plenty of openair roadwork amid rural and health-giving surroundings is the principal item, with plenty of wholesome
non-fat-producing foods.
I would also recommend the Muller* system of
exercises as distinctly healthful, and invaluable for
keeping fit when not in active training, and particularly for strengthening the muscles of the abdomen
* See Advertisement on page 75.and improving the wind. “Gym” work must be
regulated according to one’s requirements. For
example, if one’s wind be not quite sound, then skipping should he prolonged. As all the other phases
of a boxer’s training are familiar, it but remains for
me to thank all those who have given me their
sympathy and support during my long tramp up the
road that leads to pugilistic success, and to crave the
indulgence of my readers for the shortcomings of
this little book.
My great hope is, that it may be the means of
doing as much good to those who study it as it has
to me by long practising of all its various points. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- “Far and away the best system of training
for Boxers, Amateur or Professional. This is what Mr. A. F. Bettinson the
Manager of the National Sporting Club,
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Lieut. Muller is the most famous athlete
in England and the Continent, and
holds records in nearly every branch of
sport. His system (which requires no
apparatus and costs you nothing beyond
the price of the book itself) gives you Quickness, Strength, Stamina Every boxer should know and practice
it, therefore buy “My System” to-day
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B y T O M M Y B U R N S(Ex-Champion of the World.)
The life-story of one of the most scientific,
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Forty whole-page photographs of Burns fighting in different positions of offence and defence.
Burns exercising—using the exercises which enabled
him, though a middle-weight, to become the heavyweight champion of the world. Burns illustrating
various points of Ring Strategy, in which he is
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Interesting stories of boxers and boxing.
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McGoorty
10-07-2011, 07:14 AM
Gee I hope there are some who really enjoyed this.

McGoorty
05-09-2012, 11:36 AM
Here's the Klaus book Rory (less the great photos)...... let me know what you think of it, I don't think theres another one like it

McGoorty
03-31-2013, 02:37 PM
Here's the Klaus book Rory (less the great photos)...... let me know what you think of it, I don't think theres another one like it
I am bumping this for Billeau2 to find and also so I can read it again. Also because I think this thread really deserved to be commented on and read. -------------------- Thanks for the 3 guys who did read and vote in the poll... This is a serious book for true fans and for any aspiring boxers among us. I guarantee there's stuff here your coach wont teach you cos he was never taught it. Knowledge of this aspect of boxing is scarce these days, and I believe the next guy who comes along and masters this aspect will dominate and destroy everything in his path.