View Full Version : "20b Contest": The GREATEST FIGHTS EVER


McGoorty
09-08-2011, 09:29 AM
This Thread is for the great fights only, feel free to add your own fights or discuss the one's I put up :-- My First Article. Round By Round Description.AD WOLGAST Vs BATTLING NELSON :- Part ONE New York Times. 23 Feb. 1910.;-ROUND ONE :- Nelson swung his left high on his head and a moment later planted a solid left to the face. They fought at close range at a fast clip. Wolgast stood with his back against the ropes and flayed the Battler with short arm jabs to the face. Nelson forced the fighting landing right and left on the jaw and face. Wolgast, maddened, fought back fiercely, landing several powerful whallops on the champions jaw and nose. It was an even round----------------------------------------------------ROUND TWO :- Nelson started the round with a left smash to the face, and forced his man to the ropes. Wolgast landed two powerful lefts to the face, and a right and left to the jaw at close range. Nelsons lip bled slightly, both exchanged rights and lefts to the face. A right swing by Nelson opened up a cut just under Wolgast's eye that bled slightly. Nelson took the fighting to his opponent, but was met by two hard lefts to the stomach and a right to the jaw. Wolgast had a shade better of the round. ----------------------------------------------- ROUND THREE :- Wolgast shot in three straight lefts to the face, Nelson rebuking him with a right swing fairly on the jaw. Wolgast smiled and they mixed it against the ropes. Nelson brought the blood from Wolgast's nose, crossing him with a vicious right. After some wrestling, Nelson forced his man against the ropes, but Wolgast covered up and smothered neatly. Nelson was doing the majority of the work, and both men slowed down considerably. EVEN ROUND. ------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND FOUR :- Nelson piled on top of his man, and the Milwaukian fought back fiercely . Nelson staggered Wolgast with a left uppercut to the jaw followed by left and right swings to the body. Wolgast fought back gamely playing for the head and body. Nelson fought his antagonist against the ropes and tried to land a knockout punch, but Wolgast was too elusive. Wolgast landed twice with the right on the face, and then they fought at close range. Wolgast's right finding the stomach and his left landing on Nelson's jaw. Wolgast's eye was swollen as he took his seat. Both men bled from the nostrils at the close of the round, which was even. ---------------------- ROUND FIVE :- Nelson forced his man around the ring and delivered a telling hard right smash on the jaw, to which Wolgast responded in kind, lifting Nelson in the air. They went at it like a pair of bullterriers, and both men were cautioned for butting. The round ended with a furious exchande, it was Wolgast's round. ----------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND SIX :- Wolgast talked to his seconds as Nelson battered away at him. After Wolgast had landed two hard rights to the jaw and a left swing to the same place. Nelson closed in and an exchange of short arm rights and lefts to the head followed. Nelson swung a hard right to the jaw that the Battler then duplicated a moment later. Wolgast backed into his own corner and scored on the stomach with a tremendous that sent the crowd howling. A moment later he landed another one to the same place. The round closed with Wolgast taking the round. ---------------------------------------------------------- ROUND SEVEN :- Nelson appeared to have slowed down a bit. Wolgast swung two lefts to the face and a mid-ring battle followed, the men exchanging right and left swings to the face. Wolgast met the oncoming Battler with two uppercut lefts to the jaw and an instant later swung twice with rights to the face and left to the body, meanwhile covering up cleverly . Nelson sent Wolgast almost through the ropes with a left smash to the jaw. They mixed it in the centre of the ring. Wolgast bringing a fresh stream of blood from the champions face. As the bell rang, Nelson swung a hard right over the heart. The round was fairly even. ------------------------------------------- ROUND EIGHT :- Nelson rushed in, planting his right fairly on Wolgast's jaw. He forced the pace, but was met with a right and a left to the face. Nelson never faltered however, and kept Wolgast constantly at work, covering. Nelson started the blood to flow from his man's nostrils as he chased his man across the ring, landing several times with rights and lefts to his face. Wolgast sought a haven against the ropes, with Nelson slugging away unceasingly. Wolgast looked tired at this stage of the contest, and his blows seemed to have lost some of their sting. The round closed with Nelson enioying a good lead. ---------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND NINE :- Wolgast broke ground before the Battler, ever and anon trying to reach Nelson with a right and a left to the face. Finally they mixed it, fighting at a furious clip, each landing on face, and jaw. One mix was a repetition of the other, Nelson forcing his man back and Wolgast trying to stop the pace leader. Wolgast uppercut his jaw with his left, and a moment later cut open Nelsons right ear with a right swing. Nelson danced to his corner with the blood streaming from his injured ear, despite this, Nelson shaded the round. -------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND TEN :- Nelson forced the pace, constantly backing his opponent up against the ropes. Wolgast, in a corner got back fiercely, but the champion was not to be stopped. Time and again Wolgast landed, but Nelson never faltered. Wolgast peppered Nelsons face with left and right, and finally crossed with a terrific left to the jaw. Nelson never winced, all the time compelling Wolgast to step back against the ropes. Nelson again danced to his corner at the end of the round. Nelson's round. ------------Excuse me while I catch my breath !!!:boxing:

McGoorty
09-08-2011, 11:04 AM
ROUND ELEVEN :- Wolgast outboxed the champion but could not make him break ground/ Nelson mercilessly waded in, unmindful of the constant tatoo that Wolgast beat against his face and jaw with short arm hooks and jolts. Wolgast swung right and left to the jaw. The bell ended the round with Ad hammering away at Nelson's jaw and face, landing almost at will. Nelson's face was a mask of blood as he took his seat with the round honours going to Wolgast. ----------------------------------------------- ROUND TWELVE :- Wolgast was cautioned to let go by the referee. Nelson forced the pace as usual, Wolgast meeting him with several hard left swings to the jaw. Nelson was apparently trying to wear the Milwaukian out, but meanwhile he received fearful punishment. wolgast flaying with right and left with almost pendulum precision. Wolgast seemed to gain confidence as the men roughed it head to head against the ropes. Wolgast never let up and again started the blood going with right and lefts... Wolgast has big round. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ROUND THIRTEEN :- As the men towed the mark, Nelsons lips were puffed and his mouth and eyes swollen, they mixed liked tigers, Wolgast landing repeatedly on the body and jaw, with Nelson fighting wildly and spitting blood. Wolgast literally cut Nelsons face to ribbons, but still the Dane came on for more. Nelson wrestled his man to the ropes, Wolgast covering up. There was a temporary lull in the battle, after which Wolgast swung left and right to the body. The worst beating has ever recieved said the old-time ring followers, as Nelsons seconds worked on his damaged face in the minute available between the rounds.... Wolgasts round. ---------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND FOURTEEN :- Wolgast looked much the fresher as the fighters came out. He flung his right hard at the face and followed up with his left and right to the body. Nelsons face was badly swollen, and Wolgast fighting fiercely taking the fight right to the Battler. Nelson almost forced Wolgast through the ropes and then assisted him to the centre of the ring. Wolgast smiled and shook the champions hand warmly. Wolgast then hooked his left in quick succession to the jaw and followed it by a straight left to the face, and the bell ended a rather stale round. ------------------------------------------------------- ROUND FIFTEEN :- Betting now at even money, they whaled away ineffectively at one another, both showing more caution than displayed in any previous round. Nelson then wrestled his man about the ring only to be rewarded by a left uppercut to his sore mouth. Nelson, outpointed badly, continued to force the pace, all the while the target for Wolgast's well timed swings. Nelson missed a terrific swing that was labelled knockout, and this taught Wolgast that he should be careful. It was another tame round. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND SIXTEEN :- Wolgast swung several times over the kidneys and they roughed it, Nelson recieving the lions share of the punishment. Wolgast kept plugging away with rights and lefts to the jaw. Nelson never wavered but closed in, trading punch for punch, Nelson swung left and right to the body and forced his antagonist against the ropes, landing several times with right and left to the jaw. Nelson went to his seat dancing. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND SEVENTEEN :- Wolgast backed away, Nelson throwing himself on him with great vim. Wolgast met the onslaught with right and left swings to the body. Nelson fought hard and never stopped. Finally, Wolgast swung a terrific right to the jaw and then shot in half a dozen right swings onto Nelsons sore ear. Nelson received a hard uppercut on the jaw, cauding the blood to flow afresh. The men fought hard every inch of the way. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND EIGHTEEN :- "How do you feel", asked Nelson as the men came up.---- "As if I were punching a bag", was the quick rejoinder from Wolgast, with which, he waded in landing right and left on Nelson's sore mouth. Wolgast slipped to his knees in his own corner, but he was up in a jiffy, he covered up, as Nelson battered away at him but failed to land. Wolgast apparently staggered the champion, sending in several rights to the chin. Wolgast deliberately head butted and was quickly rebuked by referee Smith. The crowd hissed and the round ended without damage. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND NINETEEN :- The men came out for the nineteenth round seemingly as fresh as in the first. Wolgast time and again jabbed his left to the face, Nelson fighting back fiercely, but ineffectively. They battled about the ring, Nelson all the time the agressor and never relenting and Wolgast slowly breaking ground and playing for the face and jaw with short arm jolts. Wolgast staggered the champion with a succession of rights to the jaw. There was no giving way with Nelson, and as the round ended hr tripped to his seat. One round was practically a repetition of the last. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND TWENTY :- They slugged and roughed it from one end of the ring to the other-- it was the same old story, Nelson forcing, and Wolgasr retreating and peppering the champions badly swollen face. Wolgast planted his left with much force as the round ended... It was a relatively tame round.--------Phew !!!,.. and we are only half way folks !!!!:popcorn::popcorn::popcorn:

McGoorty
09-08-2011, 12:32 PM
ROUND TWENTY ONE :- Nelson opened the round with a vicious straight right to the jaw and Wolgast sought refuge in a clinch. Nelson then planted left and rights to the jaw. And Wolgast almost backed up to the ropes. They milled it up to the centre of the ring without doing too much damage and then exchanged rights to the face. Wolgast swung a hard right to the jaw, Nelson countered with a right to Ad's jaw. The bell ended a round of tame milling. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND TWENTY TWO :- Nelson staggered his antagonist with a clean right drive to the stomach. He followed his advantage, landing right and left with shots to the head and body. A right swing sent Wolgast to his haunches. He was up quickly but staggered across the ring. Wolgast stalled for half a minute and both swung fiercely at each other. Nelson tried with all his might for a knockout, but failed. Wolgast's seconds gave him whiskey at the break. It was all Nelsons round. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ROUND TWENTY THREE :- Nelson went right after his man and Wolgast fought on gamely. He swung twice to the Battler's jaw with his right and then a hard rally took place in mid-ring, both landing telling punches. Nelson appeared to be much the stronger of the two. He shot his left hand to the jaw, Wolgast retaliating with left swings to the jaw. Nelson tried for a knockout , but Wolgast covered up cleverly and closed in for a clinch. The round ended without serious damage. Wolgast was again given whiskey at the break. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND TWENTY FOUR :- Wolgast came up fresher, Nelson forced him from one end of the ring to the other, Wolgast in the meantime swinging viciously to the jaw with right and left. Nelson only shook his head and then shot a hard right to the jaw and a left swing to the face. Wolgast hooked his right to the jaw, Nelson countering with a left hook to the body. Wolgast slowed up perceptibly and the crowd yelled "Fight", "FIGHT", "FIght". The round ended tamely. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND TWENTY FIVE :- Nelson dropped his man among the ropes but his swings were badly directed. They exchanged savage lefts to the face and Nelson crossed his right to the jaw. Wolgast set his backers cheering by scoring thrice on the jaw with hard right swings. Soon after, he duplicated that performance, but Nelson never wavered. Wolgast appears to be tiring at this stage. The crowd let out a great cheer when they realised that Ad Wolgast had just gone twenty-five rounds. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND TWENTY SIX :- They wrestled to the centre of the ring and refused to break. Then they battled head to head, Nelson almost closing Wolgast's right eye with a straight left. After some struggling at close quarters, Wolgast swung a great whallop to the Battlers face and the Battling one went to his corner spitting blood. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND TWENTY SEVEN :- Wolgast changed his tactics at the start of this round, he rushed in close and took the fighting up to the Dane, fighting shoulder to shoulder, each landing on the face. Nelsons left eye was almost entirely closed by this stage. Wolgast clipped Nelson solidly on the jaw with his right, and the spectators cheered. Wolgast closed in and played for the body, but his efforts were blocked and Nelson broke it up with a stinging right to Wolgasts face.... Wolgasts round. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND TWENTY EIGHT :- Nelson came up with a badly swollen left cheek They fought at a hot pace, locked in each others embrace, and were cautioned to break. Breaking, Wolgast swung twice with right to Nelson's sore face, and at close range swung left and right for the mouth, starting blood. They slowed up considerably, and frequently fought to a clinch. Nelson went to his corner on a trot. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND TWENTY NINE :- Wokgast rushed, jabbing Nelson with one arm, and fought to land on the body with the other. he finally landed several swings over the kidneys and twice shot his left to the face. Nelson unhooked a left that caught Wolgast over the heart and the latter winced and groaned. Nelson caught his man straight on the jaw as they rushed to close quarters, and then followed a succession of clinches. Breaking they exchanged terrific left swings to the jaw and then fought to another clinch, in which position they ended the round. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND THIRTY :- As the men came up for this round, Nelsons left eye was completely closed. The men roughed it, Nelson hitting rather low. The crowd yelled it's disapproval. At close quarters, Wolgast drove left and rights repeatedly to the stomach and Nelson covered up. Nelson then sent a terrific right to the jaw and missed two similar blows. Wolgast swung a right to the jaw and the champion broke ground for an instant. Nelson then ended the round with a right smash to the chin. ---- The BLOODY END of the FIGHT..... Soon !!!:popcorn::popcorn::popcorn:

McGoorty
09-08-2011, 02:38 PM
ROUND THIRTY-ONE :- Nelsom trotted to the centre of the ring and Wolgast landed several short arm jolts to the stomach. Following that with a right swing to the chin. Nelson fought more carefully, Wolgast swung a hard right to the sore cheek, after which both rested in a clinch. Breaking, Wolgast swung twice with his right on the jaw and danced away as the Dane rushed after him. Wolgast had the advantage of the round. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND THIRTY-TWO :- The round started slowly, and immediately closed in, volleying at each others stomach, with Wolgast landing frequently. Suddenly Wolgast swung with his right, catching Nelson flush on the mouth, and a stream of blood followed. Nelson presented a gory picture as the blood covered him from head to foot. The round ended in Wolgast's favour. He no longer failed to mix it with the champion and appeared to gain in confidence as the fight progressed. --------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND THIRTY-THREE :- In a clinch, Wolgast drove three rights to the stomach and with his left he peppered away at Nelsons damaged eye. Wolgast then swung two rights to the same place and Nelson was half-blinded, his blows were wild, and he found it difficult to locate the Milwaukee lad. They mixed it and Wolgast landed two hard rights full tilt to the stomach and Nelson clinched. Nelson could see with one eye only, the other being out of commission. It was all Wolgasts round. Nelson's efforts to land were feeble. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ROUND THIRTY-FOUR :- Both came up quickly and had to be pried from a clinch. Bets were offered at even at this stage, with no Nelson money in sight. Wolgast peppered the Battler's sore face, and varied this with right and left short arm rips to the stomach. Nelson seemed to have lost all his vim, and seldom made any determined effort to land. The men closed in and Wolgast and started blood spouting from the champions mouth, with two well directed jolts.... Wolgasts round. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND THIRTY-FIVE :- Nelson was a sight as he came to the centre of the ring. All life seemed to have gone out of him, and although he tried to force matters all his efforts were needed to defend Wolgast's blows. Wolgast started, his arms swinging in a whirlwind fashion, landing without return on the Dane's stomach. Wolgast staggered the champion with a tremendous left swing to the jaw, and Nelson seemed to be going to pieces gradually, Wolgast smashed a right and had the champion groggy from a succession of rights and lefts to the jaw. The bell rang in the nick of time, saving the champion from what looked like, certain defeat. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ROUND THIRTY-SIX :- Nelson came up weak, he waded in but could not see Wolgast, the latter danced around the champion like a jumping-jack, sending in punch after punch. Nelson almost tottered into a clinch but Wolgast fought warily and took no chances of the Battler's stalling. Wolgast played for the head and body alternately, but his blows were not strong enough for a knockout. Nelson almost fell into his chair at the end of the round. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND THIRTY-SEVEN :- Wolgast took no chances, apparently fearing that the champion was feigning weakness. Wolgast jarred Nelson with three right crosses to the jaw and Nelson could hardly come back. They met in mid-ring with Nelson swinging like a babe and Wolgast landing with good clean punches. Nelsons ability to stem the tide was a wonderful exhibition. Wolgast almost sent Nelson through the ropes with a right smash to the jaw. Nelson tottered about the ring helpless and Wolgast sent in smash after smash as the gong rang, saving Nelson from a knockout. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND THIRTY-EIGHT :- Nelson was a pitiful sight as he staggered to the centre of the ring. Wolgast appeared in no hurry to complete his work. Robinson at this stage tried to throw in the sponge, but the other Nelson seconds grabbed the sponge and threw it back into the bucket. Nelson to all intents and purposes was a beaten man and it required all his senses to stave off or prolong inevitable defeat. Both men were covered from head to foot with the champions blood and the arena soon became a shambles. Wolgast peppered away at the disintegrating champion, the crowd yelling itself hoarse for the Milwaukee Man to end the agony. their cries were mingled with pity for Nelson, betting two to one in favour of Wolgast. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND THIRTY-NINE :- Wolgast seemed loath to put in the finishing touch, he jabbed incessantly at the Battlers anatomy, and again the blood flowed in a stream. Nelson tried to make a last rally, but it was only for a fleeting moment, and he again quickly subsided and scarcely could hold his hands up. Wolgast almost sent Nelson to the floor, landing blow after blow on the defenceless champion's face. Ring followers said that never had they seen such an exhibition of gameness as displayed by Nelson. Referee Smith said he would stop the fight in the next round if Nelsons seconds would not. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND FOURTY :- Wolgast backed away, looking for a final shot, he smashed the beaten champion on the jaw with a right, putting all his final strength into the blow. Nelson tottered on the point of collapse when referee Eddie Smith stopped the fight and awarded the fight and the title to Ad Wolgast. Nelson tried to shake the hand of his conqueror, but was so weak he was nearly dragged to his corner.AD WOLGAST :- Winner by T.K.O. 40.O.K. Your ratings for this fight. COMMENTS PLEASE !!:birthday::hitit::boxing:

Ziggy Stardust
09-08-2011, 03:10 PM
Good stuff! :cool9:

IronDanHamza
09-08-2011, 03:31 PM
Great read McGoorty.

I enjoyed that thoroughly.

McGoorty
09-08-2011, 06:07 PM
HARRY GREB Vs GENE TUNNEY IA short report from the Providence News, 24th May 1922 :-New York, May 23rd. :- Harry Greb, Pittsburgh Bearcat, and master of landing a dozen blows to his opponents one, defeated Gene Tunney, of Greenwich village, in a furious 15 round encounter in Madison Square Garden last night, and thereby won the American Light-Heavyweight Championship and the right to fight Georges Carpentier for the World Light-Heavyweight Title. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Garden was packed to the rafters and some 13000 wild-eyed fans paid$58,914.12 to see the title change hands. In addition to handing Tunney a far tougher lacing than in his fight with Tommy Gibbons a few weeks ago, greb conceded the champion a weight deficit of 12 pounds, the weights were Tunney 174 and a half and Greb 163 and a quarter. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Greb came out of the unscathed, his hair was barely mussed. Gene Tunney was a weird and gruesome spectacle. Ragged gashes poured a crimson flow from over each eye, his lips were swollen, and his nose was battered. He fought gamely enough, and he had the crowd with him, but he was no more of a match for the revolving tornado of Pittsburgh than was Tommy Gibbons. Greb maintained a terrific pace throughout the 15 rounds and from first to last he smothered all of Tunneys offensive efforts with a deluge of blows. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It was a hurricane of gloves that met Tunney last night, it was the storm that bewildered him. In two of the rounds, the 7th and the 11th Tunney managed to draw even. He was unable to reach Grebs face with either hand and gradually gave up on that direction and concentrated on the Bearcats body. HARRY GREB Wins By Unanimous Decision:argue::boxing::argue:

McGoorty
09-08-2011, 08:29 PM
HARRY GREB Vs GENE TUNNEY IA short report from the Providence News, 24th May 1922 :-New York, May 23rd. :- Harry Greb, Pittsburgh Bearcat, and master of landing a dozen blows to his opponents one, defeated Gene Tunney, of Greenwich village, in a furious 15 round encounter in Madison Square Garden last night, and thereby won the American Light-Heavyweight Championship and the right to fight Georges Carpentier for the World Light-Heavyweight Title. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Garden was packed to the rafters and some 13000 wild-eyed fans paid$58,914.12 to see the title change hands. In addition to handing Tunney a far tougher lacing than in his fight with Tommy Gibbons a few weeks ago, greb conceded the champion a weight deficit of 12 pounds, the weights were Tunney 174 and a half and Greb 163 and a quarter. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Greb came out of the unscathed, his hair was barely mussed. Gene Tunney was a weird and gruesome spectacle. Ragged gashes poured a crimson flow from over each eye, his lips were swollen, and his nose was battered. He fought gamely enough, and he had the crowd with him, but he was no more of a match for the revolving tornado of Pittsburgh than was Tommy Gibbons. Greb maintained a terrific pace throughout the 15 rounds and from first to last he smothered all of Tunneys offensive efforts with a deluge of blows. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It was a hurricane of gloves that met Tunney last night, it was the storm that bewildered him. In two of the rounds, the 7th and the 11th Tunney managed to draw even. He was unable to reach Grebs face with either hand and gradually gave up on that direction and concentrated on the Bearcats body. HARRY GREB Wins By Unanimous Decision:argue::boxing::argue:
Did you like Greb V Tunney I ???? Any takers for Zale V Graziano I. Next ????

McGoorty
09-08-2011, 08:31 PM
Did you like Greb V Tunney I ???? Any takers for Zale V Graziano I. Next ????
Or how about Sam Langford Vs Young Peter Jackson.... (they fought more than once.. so there's some leeway there.)......

McGoorty
09-09-2011, 10:51 AM
OK - No Requests ,... so from :- "The Montreal Gazette", -------------------------- 28 September 1946 ZALE Vs GRAZIANO ILarge Stadium Crowd See's unusual "BLOOD & THUNDER BRAWL" :--- By Sid FEDER : Yankee Stadium, New York, 27 Sept. Tony ZALE, every inch a champion, came back from the verge of a knockout tonight, to flatten the mighty punching Rocky GRAZIANO, in the sixth round of a "Blood and Thunder Brawl", and retain his World Middleweight Championship, Zale weighed 160 and Graziano 154. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Floored once himself, his face bloody as the dynamiter from New York's lower east side turned loose his "Rock-a-Bye" punch, the one time Indiana Steel Mill hand caught up with the challenger in the mid-way of the sixth round to drop him with a lightning left hand and put him away for keeps at 1 minute and 43 seconds in the sixth session of their scheduled 15 rounder. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- It was the second knockdown for Rocky the Rock, in as vicious and bloody a brawl that has been seen in any ring. But this second time, apparently softened up by the body bombs that are Tony's speciality he couldn't make it to his feet again. ------------------------------------------------------------------------- He sat on the ring canvas, holding on to the ropes, as referee Ruby Goldstein, himself a classy Welterweight of a bygone era, counted the full ten, to leave the 160 pound crown on Tony's head in his first defence as champion. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The crowd of 39,827, one of the greatest crowds ever to see two battlers other than Heavyweights fight it out. were on hand for the proceedings and contributed to a gross gate of $342,497. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The finish was as startling as it was definite and final and one of the greatest crowds to see two little men in action roared for 10 minutes in shock surprise at the suddeness of the end. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- WILL HE COME OUT !!! ... Up until that point, through three of the last four completed rounds. Graziano had given Tony so fierce a going over with his right hand. That when the fifth round ended, some ringsiders were even wondering whether the champion could even come out for the sixth, but out he came, bleeding from his mouth, his face a smear, and Rocky came back in again, then suddenly, Tony caught Rocky against the ropes with two of those "Tummy Torpedoe", specials of his. The Rock covered up, came half way across the ring. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Zale was after him now, he lashed out with a straight left, that straightened up the young knocker-outer who had been installed as a 11 to 5 favourite in the ringside betting. A right hand put Rocky back on his heels. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Then came the crusher, a hard, crunching left hook shot out, and there was Rocky on the deck. Through "Seven" and "Eight" it appeared as though he could pull himself up to his feet. But he couldn't, two seconds after the "Ten" though, he got up and apparently not realising that his shot at the title was over, Rocky came charging and flailing across the ring until the referee grabbed him. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- It was an astonishing pay-off to a fight that was one series of hair-raisers from beginning to end. Graziano was on the deck in the first heat, Zale was down in the second and was still there when the bell had sounded to end the second.I Wish I was there for that one. WHAT A FIGHT !!!!!!:killyou::killyou::killyou::killyou:

McGoorty
09-09-2011, 03:16 PM
Any REQUESTS Out there for my next CLASSIC FIGHT ??..... who do you want featured ???

McGoorty
09-10-2011, 03:38 PM
The DRAW That Wasn't,.....An Article from "The St. Paul Daily Globe", Sunday, 18th MARCH 1894YOUNG GRIFFO Vs IKE WEIR : Chicago, 17th MARCH 1894TWO HOT ROUNDS Between the "BELFAST SPIDER" and YOUNG GRIFFO ;. A crowd which filled to overflowing, the Second Armoury Regiment tonight saw Ike Weir, the Belfast Spider, and Albert Griffiths, better known as Young Griffo, box two hot rounds. They had started on the third when the fight was stopped by the police. Griffo showed plainly that he weighed more, by 10 or 15 pounds, than the "Spider", and in science was more than a match for Weir. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The main event was preceded by sparring of a tender nature by two local lights. Weirs seconds were Solly Smith and Harry Gilmore, while Griffo had his trainer, Sam Fitzpatrick, Jack Costello and Steve O'Donnell. The timekeepers were Malachi Hogan for Weir and Jerry Daily for Young Griffo, the referee was George Siler. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- In the first round, Weir led for Griffo but fell short, receiving a hot blow on the ribs in return. Griffo landed on Weir's neck twice, and reached for his face but was stopped. It was give and take, with fast infighting, and the round ended in Griffo's favour. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- At the call of the second round, Griffo went at Weir in a lively manner, and soon had him winded. Following up this advantage, Griffo knocked Weir to his knees, and when he jumped up Griffo hit him again, avoiding a clinch, and coming back, knocked Weir down again for the second time,...... This was followed by three more successive knockdowns, and Weir was all but out at the end of the second. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------Round three began with Weir bravely rushing Griffo, but the advantage of extra weight was too much for the "Spider". Twice Griffo knocked Weir down, and the latter was obliged to take time getting back to his feet, being very groggy. At this juncture, Inspector Shea, ordered the contest stopped, and Weir's seconds rushed into the ring and helped him to his corner. The referee was obliged to call the fight a DRAW (??????), much to the intense disgust of the crowd.Griffo wuz robbed !!!... THATS IT.... I'm Adding one more KO & WIN onto Griffo's Record....... What a destruction.. at least SEVEN KNOCKDOWNS..... WOW !!!:popcorn::popcorn:

McGoorty
09-10-2011, 06:17 PM
The DRAW That Wasn't,.....An Article from "The St. Paul Daily Globe", Sunday, 18th MARCH 1894YOUNG GRIFFO Vs IKE WEIR : Chicago, 17th MARCH 1894TWO HOT ROUNDS Between the "BELFAST SPIDER" and YOUNG GRIFFO ;. A crowd which filled to overflowing, the Second Armoury Regiment tonight saw Ike Weir, the Belfast Spider, and Albert Griffiths, better known as Young Griffo, box two hot rounds. They had started on the third when the fight was stopped by the police. Griffo showed plainly that he weighed more, by 10 or 15 pounds, than the "Spider", and in science was more than a match for Weir. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The main event was preceded by sparring of a tender nature by two local lights. Weirs seconds were Solly Smith and Harry Gilmore, while Griffo had his trainer, Sam Fitzpatrick, Jack Costello and Steve O'Donnell. The timekeepers were Malachi Hogan for Weir and Jerry Daily for Young Griffo, the referee was George Siler. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- In the first round, Weir led for Griffo but fell short, receiving a hot blow on the ribs in return. Griffo landed on Weir's neck twice, and reached for his face but was stopped. It was give and take, with fast infighting, and the round ended in Griffo's favour. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- At the call of the second round, Griffo went at Weir in a lively manner, and soon had him winded. Following up this advantage, Griffo knocked Weir to his knees, and when he jumped up Griffo hit him again, avoiding a clinch, and coming back, knocked Weir down again for the second time,...... This was followed by three more successive knockdowns, and Weir was all but out at the end of the second. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------Round three began with Weir bravely rushing Griffo, but the advantage of extra weight was too much for the "Spider". Twice Griffo knocked Weir down, and the latter was obliged to take time getting back to his feet, being very groggy. At this juncture, Inspector Shea, ordered the contest stopped, and Weir's seconds rushed into the ring and helped him to his corner. The referee was obliged to call the fight a DRAW (??????), much to the intense disgust of the crowd.Griffo wuz robbed !!!... THATS IT.... I'm Adding one more KO & WIN onto Griffo's Record....... What a destruction.. at least SEVEN KNOCKDOWNS..... WOW !!!:popcorn::popcorn:
Coming up Next,..... Jack Johnson Versus Sam Langford...As per request from fightfanSHO... ------------------It will take a little time so while I do some reading how about reading this Newspaper report of this "World Heavyweight Title Fight",.... between legends Sam McVEY and Sam LANGFORD..... You can tell me which number of their series this was................... ...... TRY READING THIS LINK...http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&d=WC19120103.2.30.1

McGoorty
09-11-2011, 09:56 AM
JACK JOHNSON Vs SAM LANGFORD ; 26th, APRIL 1906Adapted from the "Boston Journal", 27-4-1906 ;--Sam Langford was beaten badly at Chelsea last night, but he earned the the cheers of his admirers, and some others besides, by a superb exhibition of grit and courage that simply is rarely ever seen. Langford was totally outmatched by Johnson, who looked huge alongside the Boston Tar Baby, towering over him, but Langford showed no fear,..... he should have. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- He was there throughout the 15 rounds and saved a lot of money for his friends who had laid down large sums that Sam would last the first 10 rounds. But it was a question of if Sam were made of wire, for the punishment he took would seriously threaten one's health. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Most of Johnson's punches were at Langford's head, it is doubtful that Sam would have survived the 15 rounds if the Galveston Giant had done more body work, but big Jack seemed to want to prolong the severe drubbing. Sam was outweighed by a massive 35 lbs., and Johnson was too clever, too fast, too strong, too heavy and his punching was far more powerful. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sam Langford was knocked down 3 times in the fight, on the first occasion, Sam seemed to slip and there seemed to be little contact from Jacks fist, and the crowd hissed when the referee counted it as a knockdown. Then, in the sixth, Johnson landed a savage and powerful left hook to Langford's jaw,.... down he went, and he was momentarily completely still and lying flat on his face. Sam Langford stunned onlookers as he bravely made it to his feet by the count of nine. Jack pounced with a savage uppercut and Sam covered up, Jack then smashed a dynamite right hand to Sam's chin.... he went down again for another count of nine, it is likely that the bell saved him from a K.O., what was keeping Sam going ???.... it seemed the next round would be the last. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Langford stayed on his feet for the rest of the fight, but it was one-sided. Sam would rush in behind desperate left hands but Jack was always there, hitting Sam with two, three and four uppercuts, and some less legal punches. Sam at times had success with his body shots, but it was never going to be enough, Johnson was as hard as teak and he laughed in Langfords face as he always does. Sam's best punches of the fight were his clubbing overhand right but the heavier man was in no way under distress from these, there was simply nothing that seemed to work for the smaller man. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Despite Johnson's complete dominance, most observers were unimpressed, they were of the opinion that Jack Johnson was simply not ready for the Champion Jim Jeffries, saying that Jeff would have kayoed Langford well inside the the 15 rounds. The common opinion was that Jeffries was far superior to Johnson, and his power too much.------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- In Johnsons corner were, Joe Walcott, Kid Murray, Jack McCloskey and Santy Ferguson with George Dixon giving advice from the corner. In Langford's corner were George Byers, Andy Watson and others.:grr:

McGoorty
09-11-2011, 02:59 PM
JOE WALCOTT Vs Young PETER JACKSON III ; 13 March 1902Round by Round description from Boston's "THE SUN"... 14 March 1902 ;...."Young Peter Jackson fights him hard for 10 rounds";... Joe Walcott, The "Barbados wonder" attempted to put Young Peter Jackson out in a 10 round contest last night. He failed. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- There was plenty of money in the box office for Walcott to try to knock Jackson out, but despite his great ability, Jackson proved his mettle with a wonderful performance, and he showed great promise. There has never been a larger attendance than this one before in the Germania Club, the crowd was thrilled at the hard fought contest for most of this great fight.------------------------------------------------------------------ ROUND 1;... Jackson went right at Walcott from the start and kept at him throughout. His plan of battle quickly comprehended, Jackson was a bit over-anxious at first, but he got settled after a few brief, but furious exchanges. But it was Walcott that got in the first dangerous blow and it was a brutal right to the body. Savage exchanges followed and just as the gong rang, Jackson landed a hard one on Walcott's jaw. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 2 ;... Walcott landed a short hard jab to Jackson's face, Peter rolled with it, ducked and was caught with a nice oppercut, but he took the punch without flinching. Jackson replied with a stinging right to the jaw and in trying to do it again, lost balance and fell, it was no knockdown and Walcott had not thrown a punch. Walcott noticed Jackson ducking his head low, he tried an uppercut without success, Young Jackson slipping nicely. Walcot then resorted to left jabs which brought him instant success. As the round was ending, Jackson walked into a pulverising right to the side of his head, he seemed to take it without problem. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ROUND 3 ;... Walcott jabbed then threw a right cross but Jackson stepped back and it fell short. Peter ducked his head and Joe clubbed him hard on the ear with a right, this seemed to have an effect as Jackson immediately broke away, Walcott then jabbed to great effect again then got in hard rights and lefts to the body. Joe Gans called to Jackson to go in, Walcott heard Gans, turned and told him to button it, but Peter heard him and went in hard, Walcott boxed nicely to end the round. ------------------------------------------------- ROUND 4 ;... Both men were still fresh as they came out, and very determined. Walcott got in first with two hard blows to the body, for the first time there was clinching and very rugged infighting causing the large crowd to scream with amazement as these two great warriors battled it out. They broke and as Walcott stepped back, Jackson landed a neat uppercut which snapped Walcotts shaven head back, it was a terrible blow, the force should have knocked him out, and then for good measure with a hard blow to the jaw and another right cross thudded in at the gong. The round, which had started off as Walcott's, was masterfully evened up by the end,... a great round. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 5 ;... Jackson began to force the fight even harder than before. Walcott aimed a vicious right, it fell short but he scored to the body with the follow-up, it was a very hard jolt, many in the crowd were stunned at Jackson's toughness. Jackson retaliated fiercely with a hard hook to the jaw. Walcott called Jackson something unprintable and enfuriated rushed at Peter and drove him into the ropes, then they roughed each other up with more savage and unrelenting fury. This was becoming a grudge fight, earlier, Walcott had a lot to say, but now he was silent,... there was no moment to relax, such was the pace. The referee broke them apart and Walcott pounced again and hit him good and hard. This forced jackson to the ropes. The bell rang with Walcott pummeling away. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 6 ;... Jackson started the round off with a bang, he caught Walcott flush in the side of his head, it was a fearful blow. But Walcott was un-shaken by it, instead it seemed to spark him up and he replied with two good body shots without return. Jackson then sailed in and with short arm punches began out-fighting the champion. He then whalloped Walcott with a blow that staggered him, Jackson, smelling blood lost his senses for a moment and swung a blow and missed and it was Jackson that went down instead. When he got up he forced the pace and Walcott threw some fast punches, but jackson stood his ground, and for the first time Walcott seemed to be in trouble at the end of the round. This was a huge round for Young Peter Jackson, and the crowd was at a fever pitch. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 7 ;... But again Walcott came up fresh, and landed three left jabs to the face before Jackson retaliated with a hard short jolt to the head. The two battlers fell into clinching, Walcott landed some more good shots and finished the round with a hard uppercut... this was Joe's best round since the early stages,.. Walcott's round. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 8 ;... Gans told Jackson during the break to go hard from the bell. Peter did as instructed and took the fight up to Walcott who fended him off with jabs. Walcott landed a blow to the neck but Jackson forced the fight but Walcott edged the round with a quick flurry as the gong sounded... Walcott takes this round,,,, just. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 9 ;... Jackson jabbed Joe's face but walked into a hard body blow that made Peter go into a clinch, it may have hurt him, and for the first time in many rounds, Walcott started his incessant verbalising again, as usual with Joe,,,, the words were all of the unprintable nature, it was something the Barbados Wonder was a master of. Al Herford who was in Jackson's corner yelled back "It's your last chance Joe"...... the fight was so close now that nobody could predict the outcome, and there was just ONE round to go. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 10 ;... Both men were still strong enough to be dangerous, it was Walcott's last chance to earn the big money, he had bet that he would knock Jackson out, no knockout, no money. As a result of this, Walcott threw caution to the wind, if he was going to fail to score the needed knockout, at least the paying customers would get their money's worth, they were already paid back after nine very hard fought rounds. Jackson knowing the score frustrated Walcott with clinching and rough tactics and referee was getting hoarse in the throat from yelling out, "let go, let go and fight. Jackson got in a hard shot over Walcott's eye and it was swelling up badly by now. -------------------- Walcott then got in a hard left and right to the face and Jackson clinched again. As they broke from this clinch Jackson landed a massive uppercut square on Walcott's chin. Walcott landed a hard reply to Jacksons body then Joe fell into a clinch, before another punch was thrown, the final gong sounded. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------The regular Baltimore fans were unanimous in their praise for both men and said it was the hardest fought battle seen there in many years.JOE WALCOTT Draw 10 Young PETER JACKSONHow did you like that one folks ???:feedback::feedback::feedback:

McGoorty
09-11-2011, 03:55 PM
JOE WALCOTT Vs Young PETER JACKSON ; 13 March 1902Round by Round description from Boston's "THE SUN"... 14 March 1902 ;...."Young Peter Jackson fights him hard for 10 rounds";... Joe Walcott, The "Barbados wonder" attempted to put Young Peter Jackson out in a 10 round contest last night. He failed. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- There was plenty of money in the box office for Walcott to try to knock Jackson out, but despite his great ability, Jackson proved his mettle with a wonderful performance, and he showed great promise. There has never been a larger attendance than this one before in the Germania Club, the crowd was thrilled at the hard fought contest for most of this great fight.------------------------------------------------------------------ ROUND 1;... Jackson went right at Walcott from the start and kept at him throughout. His plan of battle quickly comprehended, Jackson was a bit over-anxious at first, but he got settled after a few brief, but furious exchanges. But it was Walcott that got in the first dangerous blow and it was a brutal right to the body. Savage exchanges followed and just as the gong rang, Jackson landed a hard one on Walcott's jaw. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 2 ;... Walcott landed a short hard jab to Jackson's face, Peter rolled with it, ducked and was caught with a nice oppercut, but he took the punch without flinching. Jackson replied with a stinging right to the jaw and in trying to do it again, lost balance and fell, it was no knockdown and Walcott had not thrown a punch. Walcott noticed Jackson ducking his head low, he tried an uppercut without success, Young Jackson slipping nicely. Walcot then resorted to left jabs which brought him instant success. As the round was ending, Jackson walked into a pulverising right to the side of his head, he seemed to take it without problem. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ROUND 3 ;... Walcott jabbed then threw a right cross but Jackson stepped back and it fell short. Peter ducked his head and Joe clubbed him hard on the ear with a right, this seemed to have an effect as Jackson immediately broke away, Walcott then jabbed to great effect again then got in hard rights and lefts to the body. Joe Gans called to Jackson to go in, Walcott heard Gans, turned and told him to button it, but Peter heard him and went in hard, Walcott boxed nicely to end the round. ------------------------------------------------- ROUND 4 ;... Both men were still fresh as they came out, and very determined. Walcott got in first with two hard blows to the body, for the first time there was clinching and very rugged infighting causing the large crowd to scream with amazement as these two great warriors battled it out. They broke and as Walcott stepped back, Jackson landed a neat uppercut which snapped Walcotts shaven head back, it was a terrible blow, the force should have knocked him out, and then for good measure with a hard blow to the jaw and another right cross thudded in at the gong. The round, which had started off as Walcott's, was masterfully evened up by the end,... a great round. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 5 ;... Jackson began to force the fight even harder than before. Walcott aimed a vicious right, it fell short but he scored to the body with the follow-up, it was a very hard jolt, many in the crowd were stunned at Jackson's toughness. Jackson retaliated fiercely with a hard hook to the jaw. Walcott called Jackson something unprintable and enfuriated rushed at Peter and drove him into the ropes, then they roughed each other up with more savage and unrelenting fury. This was becoming a grudge fight, earlier, Walcott had a lot to say, but now he was silent,... there was no moment to relax, such was the pace. The referee broke them apart and Walcott pounced again and hit him good and hard. This forced jackson to the ropes. The bell rang with Walcott pummeling away. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 6 ;... Jackson started the round off with a bang, he caught Walcott flush in the side of his head, it was a fearful blow. But Walcott was un-shaken by it, instead it seemed to spark him up and he replied with two good body shots without return. Jackson then sailed in and with short arm punches began out-fighting the champion. He then whalloped Walcott with a blow that staggered him, Jackson, smelling blood lost his senses for a moment and swung a blow and missed and it was Jackson that went down instead. When he got up he forced the pace and Walcott threw some fast punches, but jackson stood his ground, and for the first time Walcott seemed to be in trouble at the end of the round. This was a huge round for Young Peter Jackson, and the crowd was at a fever pitch. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 7 ;... But again Walcott came up fresh, and landed three left jabs to the face before Jackson retaliated with a hard short jolt to the head. The two battlers fell into clinching, Walcott landed some more good shots and finished the round with a hard uppercut... this was Joe's best round since the early stages,.. Walcott's round. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 8 ;... Gans told Jackson during the break to go hard from the bell. Peter did as instructed and took the fight up to Walcott who fended him off with jabs. Walcott landed a blow to the neck but Jackson forced the fight but Walcott edged the round with a quick flurry as the gong sounded... Walcott takes this round,,,, just. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 9 ;... Jackson jabbed Joe's face but walked into a hard body blow that made Peter go into a clinch, it may have hurt him, and for the first time in many rounds, Walcott started his incessant verbalising again, as usual with Joe,,,, the words were all of the unprintable nature, it was something the Barbados Wonder was a master of. Al Herford who was in Jackson's corner yelled back "It's your last chance Joe"...... the fight was so close now that nobody could predict the outcome, and there was just ONE round to go. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ROUND 10 ;... Both men were still strong enough to be dangerous, it was Walcott's last chance to earn the big money, he had bet that he would knock Jackson out, no knockout, no money. As a result of this, Walcott threw caution to the wind, if he was going to fail to score the needed knockout, at least the paying customers would get their money's worth, they were already paid back after nine very hard fought rounds. Jackson knowing the score frustrated Walcott with clinching and rough tactics and referee was getting hoarse in the throat from yelling out, "let go, let go and fight. Jackson got in a hard shot over Walcott's eye and it was swelling up badly by now. -------------------- Walcott then got in a hard left and right to the face and Jackson clinched again. As they broke from this clinch Jackson landed a massive uppercut square on Walcott's chin. Walcott landed a hard reply to Jacksons body then Joe fell into a clinch, before another punch was thrown, the final gong sounded. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------The regular Baltimore fans were unanimous in their praise for both men and said it was the hardest fought battle seen there in many years.JOE WALCOTT Draw 10 Young PETER JACKSONHow did you like that one folks ???:feedback::feedback::feedback:
C'mon guys, I'd like some feedback.... and a request for a classic fight..... who do you want to read next.

McGoorty
09-27-2011, 11:04 AM
Bump......... I thought you folks would have liked this fight thread...... anybody read any of these fights on here ?????????

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 01:38 PM
1903-03-30 Philadelphia Jack O'Brien ND6 Joe Choynski [Washington Sporting Club, Philadelphia, PA, USA]
1903-03-31 The Boston Daily Globe (Boston, MA) (page 5)
O'BRIEN WINS ON POINTS.
--------
His Blows Lack Force, and He Fails to Knock Out Choynski in a Six-Round Bout.

PHILADELPHIA, March 30.--"Jack" O'Brien of this city tonight outpointed Joe Choynski in a six-round bout at the Washington sporting club. Choynski was not match for O'Brien, whose failure to score a knockout was due to the lack of force behind his blows.

Choynski started well, but appeared to lose heart under O'Brien's unceasing rain of left-hand jabs. From the second until the last round Choynski's only object seemed to be to stay the limit.

The third and fourth rounds were particularly tame and the referee warned the men. In the sixth O'Brien was more aggressive and subjected his opponent to a severe drubbing, but his jabs and punches lacked the power to put Choynski to sleep.1903-03-31 The Evening World (New York, NY) (page 10)
JACK O'BRIEN'S JABS BEWILDERED CHOYNSKI
--------
Majority of Spectators at Bout in Philadelphia Thought Quaker Had Better of It.
--------
(Special to the Evening World.)

PHILADELPHIA, March 31.--Jack O'Brien added another leaf to his laurels last night when he defeated Joe Choynski in six rounds. The bout was far from satisfactory to the majority of the spectators because the men resorted to clever boxing. The referee warned the men in the fifth to box harder. The warning was not thrown away, as the men let out a few wraps and showed what was possible.

In the first two rounds there was little to be desired. The two men were on their best behavior. Choynski eased up in the third and took matters easily, either from self-inclination or inability to land on the elusive Philadelphian. O'Brien followed suit, but it was less noticeable than in his opponent. The fourth was a repetition of the third and the crowd began to hiss.

In the fifth round the men were cautioned and soon made the fur fly again. The sixth and last round was a hummer. Many of those present thought the men were faking because they were not covered with blood.

O'Brien and Choynski are boxers, part excellence, and not fighters of the stamp of Maher, Marvin Hart and "Kid" Carter. The Philadelphian is one of the quickest and cleverest two-handed fighters in the business, and ordinarily clever men appear slow beside him. Choynski is clever also, but the continual passage of O'Brien's gloved hands in front of his face somewhat nonplussed him.

Whether O'Brien's fast work made him appear slow, or whether despairing of reaching O'Brien's vital spot he eased up, is best known to himself, but it is a long time since Joe made such a poor exhibition. He seemed afraid to lead and his nimble opponent was on top of him all the time. Once or twice he made O'Brien wince with the effect of blows on the face and over the heart, but at no time did a knockout appear imminent. O'Brien from the start resorted to his mode of attack, jabbing with his left and trying to cross with his right. Time and again he got home on Choynski's brow and face, but the blows lacked steam. He did most of the leading and seldom failed to land.

Joe was some time sizing his man up, and just before the end of the first round caught O'Brien a vicious jolt under the eye which raised a "mouse." The second was a repetition of the first. O'Brien worked his left repeatedly in Choynski's face without a return. He varied this with an occasional swing. Choynski opened the third round with a stiff punch over the heart, but Jack got back on Joe's nose six times in succession. He had Choynski on the ropes at the end of the round.

There was no boxing in the last round. Choynski showed to better advantage than in any of the previous rounds. He caught Jack a stinging blow in the face which straightened up the Quaker. He then visited Jack's ribs two or three times. O'Brien got home several stiff heart blows when Joe set the blood flowing again from the cut over O'Brien's optic. O'Brien wound up the bout by several nasty jabs in Choynski's face. The bout was all O'Brien's.

Willie Mack, the clever light-weight boxer of Brooklyn, easily bested Otto Knapp, the Cleveland welter-weight, in the semi-wind up. The men engaged in a six-round bout, and, although Knapp had every advantage over Mack, the latter outpointed him throughout the contest. Mack used a straight left continually into Knapp's face and raised a lump over his eye. He also dazed the Clevelander several times.

Mack came near finishing Knapp with a few left hooks on the jaw, but the bell sounded in time to prevent such a proceeding. Mack's showing was so good that he has been promised a match with one of the best men in the Quaker City.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 01:42 PM
1884-03-06 Jack Dempsey W-RTD9 Billy Dacey [Campbell's Hotel, Coney Island, NY, USA]
1884-03-07 The New York Herald (New York, NY) (page 9)
DEMPSEY DEFEATS DACEY.
--------
Determined Glove Fight at Coney Island.
--------
NINE ROUNDS DECIDED.
--------
Dacey Pulls Off His Gloves and Quits when in Good Condition.
--------
Within sound of the billows of the Atlantic as they dashed on the sea girt shore of Long Island a company of three or four hundred men assembled at an early hour yesterday morning for the purpose of witnessing the glove fight between Jack Dempsey, of Williamsburg, and Billy Dacey, of Greenpoint, who were, according to articles of agreement, to fight for the sum of $300 under the Queensberry rules. It was a cold day for the short haired fraternity, the snow storm of Wednesday having covered the ground to the depth of several inches. Coach hire was expensive and walking was almost out of the question, except to those who will defy the elementals as well as the law in search of illegal sport. The experience of the "swells" at the recent Henry and Murray fight, with the accompaniments of subpoenas as witnesses, kept this class of patrons away, and when the Herald reporter reached the scene of action at midnight he looked for a long time in vain for a sight at the face of a ringside frequenter. The barroom of the hotel was tolerably well filled, but those present were so far local residents. About some there was a flavor of the stable, both in appearance and aroma, suggestive of Brighton Beach, but the majority had that far away look and hands-in-the-pocket slouch habitual with those who frequent the country grocery. Two or three females made themselves very much at home in the barroom, but did not add anything to the respectability of the place.

It was a dull, melancholy gathering. The stable gang canvassed the probabilities on forthcoming races at New Orleans, while the locals maintained a stolid silence, and but for the oaths the assemblage was orderly enough for a prayer meeting. A Mr. Sullivan raised his doleful voice and informed the company, in response to a call for a song, that France has the lily, England the rose,
Everybody knows where the shamrock grows,
Scotland the thistle that grows on the 'ill,
But America's emblem 's the violet still.

It was not until a gentleman unfolded a piece of painted oilcloth, produced a dice box and pair of dice, that the feeling of depression in the crowd was removed. In response to the invitation to bet on the chances of "under seven or even seven, a hundred can play as well as one," the racing gang first responded, then one or two of the New York sports chipped in, and the game received a fair amount of patronage, till a move was made for the ball room, on which a ring had already been roped out of about eighteen feet square. By half-past two o'clock the last quarter had been squeezed out of the local division, and all who could muster that amount were in the room, the company numbering little short of four hundred. Two lamps hung over the centre of the ring, fairly well lighting up the room. Everything was ready but the men, and of these the first to appear was Dacey, attended by George Fulljames and Jim Driscoll. Dacey entered the ring at a quarter to three o'clock, and it was well that he had all his clothes on, for Dempsey did not appear until half an hour later.

TWENTY DOLLARS FOR THE ROOM.

While the audience was finding vent for its displeasure at the non-appearance of Dempsey, the shrill voice of the landlady of the premises was heard in tones of expostulation, and forcing her way through a portion of the crowd, she shouted:--

"I want my money; I want $20 for the room!"

One of Dempsey's patrons made an elaborate speech to prove that the room had been tendered for what might be taken over the bar, and the landlady had to take the speech in lieu of the $20 she demanded.

At a quarter past three o'clock Dempsey, attended by Frank White and Dan Dougherty, stepped inside the ring, and disrobing at once commenced. Dempsey is twenty-one years of age, stands five feet eight inches, and weighed 138 pounds. Dacey was two pounds lighter, two inches shorter and one year older than the Williamsburg man. Both looked remarkably fit to fight, especially Dacey, whose face was the picture of health, and it looked odds on him as the men sat in their chairs. Betting was, however, at odds on Dempsey--first offers of even money, then $100 to $75 and $50 to $30, but Fulljames shouted in reply:--

"We want two to one or we won't back Dacey," and this put a stop to speculation.A sportsman well known in ****ing circles, and who answered for the occasion to the name of Mr. Gidden, having been selected as referee, he called the men to the scratch at twenty-five minutes past three o'clock. Both men stripped to the waist, Dempsey wearing blue trunks and Dacey white trunks, and on their hands they had fencing gloves, while another set was at hand in case of police interference, but there was no occasion to use these.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 01:44 PM
THE FIGHT.

FIRST ROUND.--Dacey, when he put up his hands, reminded one very much of Jem Murray, having the same vicious look and determined appearance. Dempsey, on the contrary, was easy in his movements. After sparring for some time Dacey led at the body, but was short. Dempsey then tried at the head, and they got to infighting and clutching at once. On breaking away, Dacey next got his right on the cheek, and Dempsey got home a good one on the throat. This nettled Dacey, who dashed in and landed a smashing blow on Dempsey's forehead, but the latter twisted Dacey off and he fell in Dempsey's corner. There was a good deal of grabbing and holding at the close of this round, and when time was called there was little to choose between the men.

SECOND ROUND.--Dempsey's forehead was flushed and swollen when he stood up for the second round. Dempsey led off with the left at the body without a return. Dacey then ran in and a succession of hugging matches took place. They then sparred for wind, and Dacey again began operations by a stinging right hander on the side of Dempsey's face. Dempsey was the next to do any business--a flush hit with the left on Dacey's cheek spinning the latter around. A number of sharp rallies followed, in one of which Dacey fell, jumping to his feet, at once resumed hostilities, and they were fighting fast when time was called.

THIRD ROUND.--Both came up blowing from the effects of the fast fighting. Dempsey, after a good deal of sparring, led with the left, getting home on the chest. Dacey ran in, but was met full on the nose with a warm left hander, which steadied him. Dempsey then missed a vicious right hand blow, and in a prolonged rally in one corner Dacey was very busy with both hands at the body. On breaking away they sparred for wind to the end of the round. An even bet of $25 was here made, and the offer of the backer of Dacey to lay another $50 failed to meet with a response.

FOURTH ROUND.--Dempsey was slow in responding to the timekeeper's call, and Dacey, after a few passes, went in to fight his man. Dempsey's replies were weak and his blows lacked force, so that the Greenpointer's friends were jubilant at the prospect of speedy victory and offered odds of $50 to $30 on Dacey.

FIFTH ROUND.--Dempsey kept away from his man as well as possible, as he was still weak, and Dacey was unable to get in any hard blows. In a rally in Dempsey's corner Dacey fell heavily, with Dempsey on top. This shook Dacey very much and the tide of battle at once took a turn. Dempsey forced the fighting and dashed in left and right, the latter drawing first blood from Dacey's mouth. Dacey clinched and held Dempsey at every opportunity and Dempsey had a lot the best of the fighting.SIXTH ROUND.--Dempsey showed a slight cut on the cheekbone, under the left eye, and blood was also trickling from a wound on the side of Dacey's nose as they stepped forward. Dempsey did all the leading off in this round, and after he had visited Dacey's neck, ribs and mouth with his right, he got in a righthander on the ear which sounded above the shouts of the excited spectators. Dacey's ear was split and began to bleed freely. Dempsey was again favorite at the close of the round.

SEVENTH ROUND.--Both wanted more time and began with a long sparring bout. Dacey at last commenced by trying with the right at the stomach, but was short, and immediately dashed in to a clinch. After breaking away Dempsey delivered his left on the ribs and the men got to close quarters. Dempsey now fell off weak, and Dacey tried his best to wind him up fighting him for all he was worth till they were stopped. Dempsey was taken to his corner decidedly weak.

EIGHTH ROUND.--Dacey ran up to the scratch as if to dispose of his opponent at once, but then began sparring. A long shot with the left by Dempsey landed lightly on Dacey's chin, and the former, boring in, was well met by Dacey with both hands. Dacey then landed a stinging left-hander on the stomach, and Dempsey, rushing to close quarters, fought Dacey down in the corner. Dacey from this on did the better work, and when time was called he was fighting Dempsey in the latter's corner.

NINTH ROUND.--Dempsey was again slow in coming up to the scratch, but he was the first to make play with his left on the chin. He then jumped in, delivering a sounder on Dacey's jaw with his left and got back without a return. After a couple of rallies Dacey tried with his left, but was hotly countered on the mouth, the blow completely staggering him. From that time to the end of the round Dempsey landed blow after blow on Dacey's bleeding mouth, following him all over the ring and doing as he pleased with his man, whose replies were most feeble. At the call of time Dacey was taken to his corner, and then pulling off his gloves told his seconds he had had enough and would fight no more. Fulljames went across and told Dempsey, who at once came over and shook hands with Dacey. The men had then been in the ring 35m. 45s. from the first call of time.

THE POLICE BEHIND TIME.

A move was at once made for Brooklyn, and six coaches, containing seventeen men, were stopped by the police of the Bergen street station, Brooklyn, near the main entrance of Prospect Park. The occupants, together with the drivers, were arrested on the charge of misdemeanor. The accused, for the most part, gave fictitious names at the station house, and when taken before Justice Walsh later in the day some were unable to remember their adopted names. As there was no evidence against them they were all discharged.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 01:53 PM
1896-03-02 Charles Kid McCoy W-KO15 Tommy Ryan [Empire Athletic Club, Maspeth, NY, USA]
1896-03-03 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY) (page 10)
MC COY'S CLEVER VICTORY.
--------
HE LOOKED LIKE A BEATEN MAN EARLY IN THE FIGHT.
--------
Ryan Was Unmercifully Pounded Toward the Close, but Was Game to the Last--A Knockout in the Fifteenth Round at Maspeth.
--------
Tommy Ryan was defeated at Maspeth in 15 rounds last night by Kid McCoy and the battle will go down in fistic history as one of the most remarkable ever witnessed. To begin with, McCoy, although half a head taller than Ryan, and big in proportion, was uneasy and uncertain of himself from the moment that he clambered through the ropes, while Ryan threw off his wraps with an air of jaunty confidence that provoked an enthusiastic devotee of the sport in the gallery to shout: "What a beautiful cinch he's got."

Ryan's magnificent record made him easily the favorite. Lots of his friends' money went begging at rates varying from 10 to 7 to 2 to 1. And it looked at the start as if the knowing ones had fathomed the whole thing. He simply played with McCoy and when the round ended many of the spectators began to pick up their snow shoes and their overcoats in order to escape the rush of the battle to get out of the building. Then came the sensational point of the encounter.

McCoy began to find his man and he assumed some confidence. A few minutes later he opened Ryan's nose. Then he persisted in jabbing Tommy on the jaw with his long left and every tap that he gave brought the blood, until Ryan was bleeding like a stuck pig and had more trouble in getting rid of the blood that choked him and blinded him that he had in warding McCoy's blows. Ryan was knocked down three times in the fatal fifteenth round and he showed once and for all that he was game to the backbone. It took him fifteen minutes to recover and when he tottered from the ring he would have dropped if the arms of his seconds had not been around him.

All the sports for miles around were at the ringside, including Tom O'Rourke, Sam Fitzpatrick, Arthur Lumley, M. Giubal, Macon McCormick, Maxey More, P. T. Powers, Fred Peffer, Billy Crowley, Martin Dowling and hundreds of others.

Jack Downey of Brooklyn and Larry Burns of Cohoes warmed up the 3,000 spectators in an eight round bout at 125 pounds. Everybody knew Downey and picked him out as a winner, while Burns was an unknown quantity. He had a big, hearty contingent of friends with him though and they rooted while he fought till the building rang again. They began to fight at 9 o'clock sharp. Downey was handled by Tommy Butler, Pete Farrell and Joe Martin, while Burns was looked after by John McTiernan, Tommy Hunt and George Davis. Tim Hurst in his familiar navy blue sweater was the referee, as usual.

In the opening rounds Burns was slow and appeared to be somewhat afraid of Downey. Jack forced the fighting and when the third round opened there were repeated offers of 50 to 40 on his chances. It was in the fifth round that the stranger, smiling and confident, began to assert himself. At close quarters he had all the advantage. Toward the close of the sixth round he might have disposed of the popular Brooklynite, but he was slow and content to wait. Burns forced the fighting after that and the backers of Downey began to quake when he held the gloves over his face to protect himself and made no effort at attack. There were some hot exchanges in the last round. Here again Burns had a beautiful chance for a knockout but he was slow and cautious. When he did attempt to finish the job Downey's clever head averted a catastrophe. The bout ended with hot in fighting in which Downey figured to advantage. He cut open his opponent's left eye. The referee called the bout a draw and everybody applauded the verdict.

The clock pointed to 10 o'clock as Tom Ryan pushed his way into the ring, smiling and confident. He was pioneered by Charley White, Tom Cawley, Kid Lavigne and Sam Fitzpatrick. The cheers that greeted the young fellow, who had claimed the middleweight championship of the world, had scarcely died away when Kid McCoy was seen struggling through the enthusiastic crowd, surrounded by Steve O'Donnell, Maurice Hagstrom and Brooklyn Jimmy Carroll. Presently the memorable battle began. McCoy appeared to be feverishly anxious to find out what there was in Ryan that had given him his reputation and he tried to hit him on the face. Several of his leads went harmlessly over his head. Once, in ducking, though, the big kid caught Ryan a clip on the jaw and his friends cheered enthusiastically. Then Ryan let himself loose. He smashed McCoy on the face and body with right and left, cleverly kept his head out of the kid's attempted returns and there were frequent clinches, and when the round ended the betting was 100 to 50 on Ryan. There was a slightly different color given to the affair in the next round. McCoy was a trifle more confident and Ryan began to sprint. The kid smashed Tommy viciously over the heart. Then they clinched and McCoy emerged smilingly with the honors of the encounter. Ryan began to fight in the third round. He landed cleverly a couple of times on McCoy's jaw and then he ran round the ring. The kid followed him, and as Tommy tried to duck he gave him a left hand punch on the jaw. Ryan turned upon his man after that. He was nettled at having been caught so easily and in some fierce infighting he had all the better of it. Ryan planted two heavy body blows in the fourth round but had to take two vicious right hand hooks on the jaw in return. Ryan swung his right heavily on the big kid's jaw and McCoy tottered. If the round had lasted half a minute longer Tommy Ryan would to-day be the middle weight champion of the world. McCoy was very weak about the legs. He pushed his gloves weakly in Ryan's face, and, obeying the instructions of his seconds, clung round Ryan's neck as long as he dared. Ryan forced the fighting in the fifth round again and his vicious pokes on the body and his swings on the jaw soon had McCoy staggering and dazed. The kid, however, continued to slip in a pretty left hand upper cut. Ryan sprinted again, but was caught with another clip behind the ear from the force of which he went down. No damage was done, however, and it was still Ryan's fight. The battle was fast and furious in the seventh, with the honors fairly even. McCoy poked his left four times savagely into Ryan's ribs. Ryan looked a bit worried. He feinted and then he flung out his right. It caught the Kid squarely over the heart and twisted him round as if he had been working on a pivot. It seemed again as if another punch would dismiss McCoy, but he was in rare fettle and kept himself as cool as a cucumber. He jabbed Ryan repeatedly on the face with his left, brought the blood freely and finally gave Tommy a punch that knocked him down. The fight was now a guessing match. McCoy surprised every man in the building by his coolness, his cleverness, his swiftness and his terrific hitting powers. It was in the ninth round that Ryan's star began to wane. He sprinted. McCoy ran after him and, catching up on his man, smashed him from behind with his right and left. Ryan then mixed it up hotly and got in several heavy body blows. McCoy flung out his long left repeatedly, jabbed Ryan on the nose, cut it open and closed up an eye. McCoy continued to jab in the next round, the tenth. Ryan was bleeding, profusely cut, lips swollen, eyes swelled, and was a beaten man but he was as game still as a fighting ****. He was a perfect glutton for punishment and he got it. McCoy, just as the round ended, got his man against the ropes. He held Tommy out with his long left arm and brought his right viciously over his helpless opponent's jaw.
The fight still went on, although Ryan was a badly beaten man. McCoy was as quick and as strong as he had been at the beginning. He punched Ryan at will, jabbed him at will on the face and body and again opened up the damaged nose and the abnormally swollen lips. Ryan stood up to his punishment like a man till he was knocked squarely off his feet with a savage right hand uppercut. This was in the twelfth round. Ryan tried to get a few minutes' breathing space in the thirteenth round, but McCoy kept at him and floored him twice. In the next Ryan stepped up to the kid stronger and fresher than in the preceding half dozen rounds and his clever and effective work began to impress his friends with the idea that he still had a fighting chance. But McCoy's pitiless jabs were thrown without cessation into his face.

The end came in the fifteenth round. Ryan was very weak, but still able to run. He did try to sprint out of the way of McCoy's wicked jabs, but the kid followed him up closer and gave him a left hand punch on the jaw, flooring Tommy. The latter struggled to his feet before he had been counted out with the blood streaming from his face. McCoy was waiting for him, and gave him a thump with his right on the jaw that knocked Tommy down again. All this was against the ropes. Ryan staggered to his feet again as Tim Hurst stood over him and, willing as ever, held his hands out blindly as he stumbled to the middle of the ring. There again McCoy was waiting for him with his pitiless right ready. Everybody was glad when he shot it out and brought Ryan down for the third time with a clip in the ear. Ryan had been hopelessly beaten long before and the spectators simply waited to see a satisfactory finish. They got it. When Ryan fell on his back he was senseless and a quarter of an hour passed before he was able to leave the ring with the arms of his seconds around him.

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 02:05 PM
JEM BELCHER Vs JAMES "Deaf Un" BOURKENEW YORK EVENING POST
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 25, 1802
BELCHER vs BOURKE


The following minute and technical description of
a barbarous amusement, still kept up among the
English, may be gratifying to some, as affording a
specimen of the state of manners in that country.

BOXING MATCH
BETWEEN BELCHER AND BOURKE

1st Round was long; much sparring and
squaring, hard blows struck, both parties dis-
played much spirit but little skill. Bourke
appeared to have a good chance, throwing in
a blow which cut Belcher under the left eye;
they closed and both fell, neither having the
advantage.
2nd Round was decided, Bourke closing on
Belcher without any sparring, and throwing
him, both falling, Belcher beneath.
3rd Round - Smart and severe; sharp blows
passing on both sides; Bourke aimed a great
blow at Belcher's nose, which the latter op-
ped with his right hand, and threw in a very
hard straight forward blow with his left hand
at Bourke's right eye, which took full effect;
the blood gushed out, & the face swelled round
the eye, in such a manner as nearly to close
up the sight. Belcher immediately closed on
Bourke, and gave him a severe fall.
4th Round - Much sparring; no blows took
effect. Bourke closed on Belcher and threw
him a dreadful fall, Bourke falling on Belcher
with all his weight very heavily. In conse-
quence of this fall, the betting, which had
been 3 to 1 against Bourke, changed to 3 to 2.
5th Round - Squaring. Bourke followed
up Belcher very quick, Belcher retreating
till he came with some force upon the railing
which enclosed the stage: Bourke close upon
him. Those who backed Bourke were now in
high spirits; but Belcher, when against the
rails, laid hold of the rail with the right hand,
and with this purchase swung himself round in
such a manner as enabled to give Bourke,
with his left hand, a doubly severe blow on
the throat, immediately upon which the blood
gushed out of his mouth in torrents; and Bel-
cher instantly followed this by a sharp blow
with his right hand on the left side of Bourke's
head, the latter fell, Belcher upon him, Bourke
having hold of Belcher's hands. The betting
again became 2 to 1 in favor of Belcher. -
Bourke sat down on his second's knee for about
half a minute, water was given to wash his
mouth, which, notwithstanding, continued to
bleed very much; his face was also wiped
with handkerchiefs, and means taken to
refresh him. During this time, Belcher was
walking about the stage.
6th Round - Bourke fell the first blow
which took effect smartly on the cheek, just
below the eye that had before been nearly clos-
ed up.
7th Round - Bourke immediately arose, and
early gave Belcher a blow with his right hand
on the side of the head; Bourke closed on
Belcher; a violent struggle took place; but
Belcher had the advantage, throwing Bourke
and falling on him; a rest of nearly a minute
took place; Bourke appeared much exhausted.
8th Round - Bourke, with much spirit and
energy threw a blow with his left hand,
which took effect on Belcher's breast; Bourke
closed and threw Belcher.
9th Round - Bourke's nose was cut open;
he closed on Belcher, who threw Bourke; a
heavy fall. This round was very decisive in
Belcher's favor
10th Round - Belcher threw a blow at
the eye of Bourke, which had been nearly
closed up; the blow took effect; Bourke fell.
11th Round - Belcher threw in several blows
on the breast, which seemed to severe. Previ-
ously to this none of the body blows on either
side were much worthy of notice. Bourke
closed on Belcher and threw him with great
violence, falling upon him.
12th Round - Both seemed rather exhaust-
ed; Bourke closed early, a powerful wrestle;
Bourke prevailed, Belcher falling under him,
Bourke falling heavy. A rest of about half a
minute took place.
13th Round - Belcher received a full blow
on the breast, which made him stagger;
Bourke closed and again threw Belcher, fall-
ing heavily on him. A short round.
14th Round - Belcher cut Bourke's left cheek
both closed and fell after a long struggle.
Both displayed more science in this round than
in any of the preceding.
15th Round - Several hard blows on both
sides, though none of them seemed decisive;
both closed and fell, Belcher uppermost. A
rest of about half a minute.
16th Round - Bourke appeared very weak;
he received another blow on the cheek; and
one on the nose, were he had been struck
before; Belcher's knuckles appearing to be
buried in his nose. Still Bourke would not
fall until he received a sharp blow under the
right ear; the blood gushed out at his ear and
2at his mouth; he then fell. This round was
decisive of the battle. After the first blow in
this round, Bourke seemed enraged, and to
have recovered all his strength; he struck Bel-
cher several blows in the breast, but none of
them severe, though they made Belcher stag-
ger a little. Bourke's face was so smashed to
pieces, and so besmeared with blood (his eyes
nearly closed up) that he seemed to make a
mad and desperate effort, regardless of conse-
quences. This laid him very open to Belcher,
who was now amazingly active, throwing in
his blows with both hands. The friends of
Bourke all cried that he should give in, as he
was manifestly too severely beaten; but he
would not yield, though he was unable, with-
out assistance to rise, his second lifting him
up by the waistband of the breeches.
17th Round - Bourke appeared to stand very
firmly; but one severe blow throw on his
nose, knocked him smack down. Bourke
now gave in, and Belcher was declared vic-
tor. At the termination, there were but par-
tial plaudits, most of the spectators feeling for-
Bourke's situation, sympathizing with him as
a man of far more bottom than they expected.

_ A more severe contest never, perhaps;
took place. And Bourke displayed every
possible characteristic of determined courage
and indefatigable perseverance. Their ap-
pearance and a mode of fighting were very dif-
ferent. Bourke was much superior in a point of
weight, nerve and muscle - Belcher was su-
perior in quickness of arm, activity of body,
and a combination of movements which gene-
rally prove successful over a single excellence,
or requisite for the practice of pugilism. -
Bourke frequently pushed his courage to fero-
city, and sometimes struck at random; Bel-
cher was, even in the hottest moment of the
battle, master of temper, and seemed ne-
ver to strike without a specific object. Bourke
although absolutely exhausted, offered to con-
tinue the fight, but he was over-ruled by his
second and carried off the stage in a most
wrenched condition. Belcher received several
very severe blows, particularly in the body;
but he bore them with great patience, and did
not leave the ground for upwards of an hour
after. The battle was for one hundred guineas
a side, and some thousands depended upon its
issue.
_ Mendoza was to have seconded Bourke, but
he was afraid if he did so, that he might loose
the license of the public house he keeps in Mile
End Road.
_ Belcher having beat Bourke, has challenged
Mendoza, and offered to fight him in a month
for 200 to 300 guineas; to which bravado
Mendoza calmly replied, that he had relin-
quished the trade of fighting; that he support-
ed a family of six children by his exertions as
landlord of the Lord Nelson public house, in
White-chapel; that there was one man he
would fight; and that was Jackson, who, in
consequence of his having behaved unhand-
somely and unfairly in the former contest, had
aroused Mendoza to satisfaction, if not to ven-
geance.
_ It is quite true, that Belcher is not a man of
science, according to the rules of the pugilis-
tic art; but he possesses a style peculiarly his
own, which baffles a regular science. He is
remarkable quick, springs backward and for-
ward like lightning; you hear his blows but
never see them; at the conclusion of a round
his antagonist is beaten and bloody, but you
did not see Belcher give a blow. This is in-
deed a science peculiarly his own. It is one
which none of the regularly bred artist can
meet, it is felt, but not seen and means cannot
be devised of mastering it.

_ [Bourke very nearly paid the forfeit of his life
in this affair. Belcher was arrested to abide the
consequences if death had ensued.]

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 02:19 PM
ELMIRA TELEGRAM (NEW YORK)
SEPTEMBER 10, 1905
JIMMY BRITT vs BATTLING NELSON NELSON'S THE BOY

Battling Gave James Edward Britt
His in the 18th Round

THE FIGHT WENT A FAST CLIP

Game of Give and Take Witnessed by More Than
_ Ten Thousand People - The Long-Disputed
_ Supremacy No Longer in Balance - Nelson
_ Right There With the Goods From First Tap
_ of the Gong

[By Associated Press]
_ San Francisco, Cal. Sept, 9. - In a
fight that had many novel features,
Battling Nelson, of Chicago, knocked
out Jimmy Britt, of San Francisco, at
Colma, this afternoon. The end came
in the eighteenth round and was a
fairly won victory. The suroundings,
the crowd, the bitterness of the men
toward each other, the uncertainty as
to whether there would be a fight at
all up to within a quarter of an hour
before the fight actually began, to-
gether with the cleverness and the
endurance displayed by the two box-
ers, made the fight one of the great in-
terest to followers of fighting.
_ It was the success of a strong, en-
during fighter against a clever, cool
man. From the first, until Referee
Graney finished the count of ten sec-
onds, Nelson forced the fighting.
Though suffering many bruising blows
on the face and body, and being at
times very tired, Nelson never gave
ground. he came back after every at-
tack by Britt, always ready to exchange
blows. For the rushing, forcing, per-
sistent tactics of Nelson, Britt could
find no effective counter. The Califor-
nian tried every blow known to him
to stop his tireless opponent. In every
way Britt failed, although he punished
Nelson severely, knocking him down
once and staggering him several times.
_ Only once, in the third round, did it
appear to those close enough to judge
the tide of battle, that Britt might win.
In this round Britt reached the most
vulnerable spot on Nelson's muscled
body, the stomach, with two terrific
right-hand blows, that carried pun-
ishment. Nelson faltered for a mo-
ment and doubled over. Quickly turn-
ing his attention to Nelson's face,
Britt sent a terrible right cross that
dropped the Dane to his knees.
_There was a shout from Britt's sup-
porters, but Nelson got up before the
timer could reach the count of two.
The call for the time of the succeeding
round found Nelson fresh. Nelson
was always the first to begin rounds,
though not always the first to land a
blow. Time after time he would glide
along after Britt, much after the style
of Fitzsimmons, never clever on his
feet, but always seeking to shorten
the distance between his opponent and
himself. Tireless persistence and dis-
regard of physical punishment char-
acterized Nelson's fighting through-
out.
_ Britt fought gamely at all times, but
after his spurt in the third, the Cali-
fornia fighter weakened, perceptably, to
those seated close to the ring side. Britt
had used all his strength, all his clev-
erness and all his blows in the third
and he had failed to achieve a knock-
out. Britt appeared to realize as he
took his corner after the fourth round
that he was unable to hurt his oppo-
nent. Nelson also seemed to reach this
decision at the same time and subse-
quently took Britt's blows with more
confidence and without flinching. Ex-
cept in spots, these rounds were all
pretty much alike.
_ Nelson always forcing, Britt always
giving ground; Britt trying to keep
Nelson at the end of his snappy left
hand and the Dane using every means
to get inside the circumference of the
Californian's hands. Whenever Nel-
son broke down the defense or ac-
cepted the blows aimed at him, he
would hammer away at the body, al-
ways coming out of a clinch swing-
ing at the jaw. The agreement of the
two men to break at the call of the
referee and the referee's interpreta-
tion of the rules and their strict en-
forcement, seemed to be in Nelson's
favor.
_ Graney told the men before the fight
that they must break at his command,
and he carried out his intention. The
refereeing was successful, according to
popular opinion.
_ In the fifth Britt held and advantage,
staggering Nelson with a series of
blows and making a desperate effort to
win. This was the first round in which
both threw aside all knowledge of box-
ing and exchanged viciously, each
hoping to end the fight with one blind-
ing delivered lucky blow. Both were
bleeding at the close of this round, but
Nelson was the stronger. It did not
seem possible that a fight could be
much fiercer than the fifth, but the
succeeding period of three minutes
brought the vast crowd to its feet and
kept it there throughput the round.
_ The fighters slugged each other
ceaselessly. Both were bleeding and
weary, but always game. In the last
minut of the sixth Nelson suddenly
took the lead, annd getting Britt in a
corner, beat him about the body and
face until he went weaving about the
ring vainly trying to protect himself.
_Britt took a terrific beating about
the body, unable for a time to block
Nelson's blows; but, in a flash, Britt
took a brace. He set himself in the
middle of the ring and met Nelson
with two punishing swings to the
face. Nelson halted and Britt leaped
forward. He slugged and swung in
one last desperate effort, but again the
gong ended the round, like the prev-
ious critical, at an opportune time for
Nelson.
_ In the eighth Nelson had Britt in
trouble, staggering the Californian with
a left and driving him to the ropes.
Britt's seconds were in a frenzy, shout-
ing all sorts of orders. Above all was
the voice of "Spider" Kelly, who shout-
ed; "Cover up, Jimmy!" Jimmy obeyed
and probably saved himself from going
down in this round. After the eighth
Britt appeared to tire fast. The pace
was slower and in Nelson's favor.
_ In the tenth and eleventh Nelson con-
tinued to wear out Britt, In the twelfth
Britt rallied suddenly and battered
Nelson for two minutes. Nelson covered
his jaw and took most of the blows on
the nose, ear, or stomach. Britt wore
himself out and finished the round
tired. It became evident to Britt's sec-
onds after the twelfth that their man
was being beaten. They sought to bols-
ter his wavering confidence with cheer-
ful remarks, but Britt appeared to
realize that he was beaten.
_ In the thirteenth Britt took a beat-
ing with gameness. The fourteenth
was the most exiting one. Nelson,
knowing Britt was tiring fast, had
before him determination to end
the battle. In five seconds he had
Britt staggering, his guard lowered
and all but out. Time and again
Nelson planted left hand blows on
Britt's face driving him against the
ropes. Over-eagerness on Nelson's
part prolonged the fight beyond this
round. Seeing his brother beaten
down, Willie Britt shouted: "Swing
Jimmy, swing!" Setting himself to
meet Nelson, Britt swung his right
hand with all the strength in his body.
_ The blow landed and Nelson was
not only stopped, but seemed to give
gound. Britt pressed the advantage
and, with his feet set far apart to
steady himself, once more he met
Nelson with full arm swings, finally
forcing the Dane to clinch. The gong
sounded while they were standing
head to head, slashing at each other
with both hands.
_ The crowd arose and cheered the
desperate struggle in the fourteenth
round compelled both men to show up
in the next two rounds, and no de-
cisive work was done by either, though
Nelson showed more strength when-
ever they came to a clinch. The sev-
enteenth was Nelson's by a good mar-
gin.
_ The eighteenth proved the end for
Britt. A detailed account of that
round, which lasted about two min-
utes, shows little difference from the
preceding rounds. Britt was tired,
but seemed willing. Nelson forced him
about the ring and gave many body
blows, always boring in. He cornered
Britt and drove him against the ropes.
Britt squirmed out and sent in a ter-
rific left to the stomach that appeared
to hurt Nelson. Nelson covered his
body and Britt swung for his face.


_ [up to a half hour after midnight this
morning the Associated Press was unable
to supply the Telegram with a full ac-
count of the fight, stating earlier the
story was "delayed by wire trouble
west." - Editor Telegram.] BEFORE THE BATTLE

McGoorty
10-07-2011, 02:21 PM
BEFORE THE BATTLE

Scenes and Incidents In and About
The Arena
_ Ringside, Colma, Sept. 9 - The
scenes just outside the high fence
around the arena before the beginning
of the fight had all the appearances
of a frontier mining camp or the im-
mediate vicinity of a circus. Taking
advantage of the fact that they were
outside the city and county of San
Francisco, and across the border line
of San Maeto county, gambling sharps
operated games of infinite variety, As
is usual at the great sporting events
there was a crowd of hangers on out-
side as large as the inside, and these
freely played the games. Thousands
of dollars changed hands. On many
of the roulette and faro tables hun-
dreds of dollars were stacked in coin
in plain view of the crowds. Many
games were conducted by women, who
reaped a rich harvest.
_ Almost every available automobile
in San Francisco had been engaged to
bring sporting men to the ringside.
Improvised garages outside the arena
were filled with machines. Several
taaly-ho parties lent a spectacular
feature to the scene. Large delegations
of ring followers came from all the
large cities and numerous eastern
points. There was no disorder. The
main portion of the crowd did not be-
gin to arrive until 1 o'clock when they
poured through the gates. The ushers
became confused and the asiles were
badly congested. The first question
asked was:
_ "Who will be the referee?"
_ When they found that question was
still unsettled, the sentiment was free-
ly expressed that there "would be a
fight or a shooting scrape." The un-
certainty practically brought betting to
a standstill. The pool room concession
had prepared to handle the big crowd
of betters, but no business was done,
although odds of 10 to 6 were offered,
Britt being the favorite. As the hour
set for the fight approached the crowd
became restless and nervous, many
standing upon the seats. A score of
women came in with escorts, each one
being cheered. Nolan still persisted
in his refusal to bringNelson into the
ring until a referee satisfactory to
himself should be selected, and at 1:15
p.m. the uncertainty was as great as
ever. After the boxers weighed in at
Corbett's in San Francisco this fore-
noon, they got into autos with their re-
spective managers and trainers and
started for Colma. A chill wind car-
ried a heavy fog in from the ocean and
the men appeared thoroughly chilled.
_ _ JEFFRIES MAKES
_ _ HIS APPEARANCE
_ J.J. Jeffries came through the
gates to the arena at 1:20 and took a
seat at the ring side. He was cheered
by the crowd, but paid no attention to
the demonstration. Jeffries said he
was on hand to act, as he had been
chosen by the fighters and the club.
He knew nothing about what they
intended to do aside from that, he
said. Nelson's father came up to Jeff
and told him that he wanted the re-
tired champion to act as referee. Jeff
declared he did not want to referee.
At 1:30 Nolan left the arena and de-
clared he would not return until the
question was settled. Seated in a box
close to the ring side were Mrs. James
J. Jeffries and Mrs. William Delaney,
with escorts. Promptly at 1:30, the
hour scheduled for the fighters to ap-
pear, the crowd sent up a shout,
"Sit down," and kept it up until all
seat-holders were in their places. At
1:40, Manager Coffroth came into the
ring and called Willis Britt up and
told him to bring Jimmy in. "I have
told Nolan that I would give him unti
2 o'clock to produce Nelson. Your
contract calls for the men to be in the
ring at 1:30 p.m. If Nelson is not on
hand at 2 p.m. I will call for the for-
feit."
_ "Why don't you provide a dressing
room?" said Nolan. "You have a
room," said Coffroth. Immediately
Nolan went out. Britt came into the
ring at 1:53, accompanied by his
seconds, "Spider" Kelly, Sam Berger
and "Tiv" Kreling. Britt selected the
southwest corner. He was fully dress-
ed, wearing a long overcoat over a
thick sweater and trousers. As soon
as Britt got into the ring, Manager
Coffroth sent word to Nelson that
Brritt was on hand and ordered Nelson
to appear immediatly. There was no
sign of him, however, and after a
while Willie Britt demanded that Nel-
son be produced at once, adding: "I'm
not going to keep my man here all
day. That fellow Nelson was to be
here at 1:30. It is now after 2 o'clock
and he had better show up here soon
if there's going to be a fight."
_ "It's pretty tough," said Coffroth, "to
get up against this situation ahter six
months work getting this match, and
perfecting all arrangements, to say
nothing of the expense I have been put
to."

_ _ GRANEY IS
_ _ FINALLY SELECTED

_ At 2:10 Jeffries came into the ring.
It was said at that time that Nelson
absolutely refused to appear. Billy Jor-
dan then made this announcement:
_ "Gentlemen: Mr. Nelson refuses to
come into the ring unless they select
a man other than Jim Jeffries for re-
feree."
_ A great chorus of jeers and cries
had interrupted him.
_ "Mr. Britt," continued Jordan, "will
not stand for anyone other than Jeff-
ries. Now, gentlemen, three rousing
cheers for the undefeated champion of
the world, J.J. Jeffries."
_ Three cheers were given. After a
long wrangle, it was announced that
Jeffries had retired from the field, and
Graney was selected. The announce-
ment that the referee question had been
settled caused a change in the betting
and many wagers were made, Britt
being the favorite at 10 to 6. At 2:33
Nelson appeared. On his way down he
was greeted with jeering and hooting.
He was accompanied by Harry Foley,
Martin Murphy, Billy Nolan and Fred
Landers.

_ _ ALL BETS
_ _ ARE DECLARED OFF

_ Nelson was introduced as the "hard-
est nut to crack in the lightweight
class, "Battling Nelson." This intro-
duction was cooly received. Britt was
then introduced as the "pride of Cali-
fornia" and he was loudly cheered.
Challenges flew thick and fast. Eddie
Hanlon, Jimmy Gardner, Aurello
Hererra and Willie Fitzgerald were
some of those who want to meet the
winner. An announcement that came
as a surprise was that Graney declar-
ed all bets off on the contest. The mov-
ing picture machines were started as
soon as Nelson entered the ring.
Graney explained with reference to his
declaring bets off, that it only applied
to bets made previous to his selection
and acceptance as referee; that all
others could stand.

THEY GET BUSY
After a Day of Wrangling the Mill
Finally Starts
_ Graney called the men to the cen-
ter and gave them instructions. "You
boys are going to fight under the
Marquis of Queensberry rules," he
said. "My interpretation of these
rules is that there must be no holding.
I don't want to put my hands on you.
When I say break, I want you to
break without any unnecessary de-
lay." The men shook hands, strip-
ped quickly and the ring was cleared.
Britt wore red trunks, trimmed with
the national colors. Nelson had on
pale green trunks with a pink belt.
At 2:47 the word was given and the
fight was on.

THEIR FORMS

Nelson

_

Britt

5 ft. 7 inches
133 pounds
67 inches
15 inches
34 1/2 inches
37 inches
25 inches
12 inches
11 1/2 inches
7 3/4 inches
20 inches
14 inches
7 inches

height
weight
reach
neck
chest normal
chest expanded
waist
biceps
forearm
wrist
thigh
calf
ankle
5 ft 6 inches
133 pounds
65 1/2 inches
15 inches
35 1/2 inches
38 inches
28 inches
12 inches
10 1/2 inches
7 inches
19 1/2 inches
13 inches
7 inches


TELEGRAM KEPT
BUSY LAST NIGHT
_ If there is any doubt of the extent
of interest manifested in the Nelson-
Britt fight of yesterday afternoon, just
ask the girls who manipulate the
electric fluid carring wires at either
of the local exchanges. Churchmen
managed to scrape up a personal or
two to telephone the Telegram and
incidentally asked how the fight came
off. Others inquired because their
neighbors wanted to know.
_ In fact, the Telegram plugs at both
centrals were badly disfigured during
the evening, but the men behind the
guns in the editorial sanctum looked
pleasant and obliged all who called.
There was a good deal of humor in it
anyway and it was good for the ear-
ache to listen to the involuntary ut-
terances of those who secured the in
formation.
_ Some merely grunted; others gave
vent to joyous exclaimations and not a
few expressed disappointment. There
were the usual number of "I-told-you-
sos." Ninety-nine out of a hundred
would "thank you" before hanging up
the receiver. The "number-please"
girls say that many who called the
Telegram, immediately also, called
either one or the other of the evening
papers, but the bells rang to empty
rooms. The telephone calls for in-
formation began to come in before
2 o'clock in the afternoon. When the
real result was announced about 7
p.m., many doubted the correctness
of the report and there was a clamor
for more news and detail.
_ Not all pretend to be sportively
inclined, yet there are few who are
not anxious to learn the result of
tests of strength, endurance and phys-
ical science. Perhaps, they don't ap-
prove of the game and wouldn't at-
tend a fighting match if they had the
opportunity, but they want to know
how it came out. The Telegram was
glad to give its friends all the infor-
mation in its possession. It always is.

McGoorty
10-08-2011, 09:11 AM
1899-03-14 Terry McGovern W-KO18 Patsy Haley [Lenox Athletic Club, New York, NY, USA]
1899-03-15 New-York Tribune (New York, NY) (page 6)
M'GOVERN KNOCKS OUT HALEY.

Terence McGovern, the clever little fighter of Brooklyn, knocked out Patrick Haley at the Lenox Athletic Club last night in the nineteenth round. It was a lively fight, with McGovern always the aggressor. They boxed at 115 pounds and were to go twenty-five rounds, provided the bout was not ended before the twenty-fifth round. Haley showed much science, and his science saved him from being badly scarred. He was knocked out by a right-hand blow on the jaw, and in falling struck his head on one of the padded posts. He was carried to his corner in a dazed condition, but recovered in a few minutes. He was slightly cut on the face from McGovern's swings with the left and right hands.

It is said that McGovern will now claim the 115-pound championship of the world, and be prepared to defend it against "Pedlar" Palmer, of England, or any fighter in his class.

The preliminary bout was of ten rounds at 108 pounds between Daniel Dougherty, of Philadelphia, and James Johnson, of this city. In the tenth round Dougherty knocked Johnson down. Referee White then stopped the bout and awarded the fight to Dougherty.


1899-03-15 The Evening Telegram (New York, NY) (page 7)
HALEY DEFEATED IN EIGHTEEN ROUNDS
--------
"Terry" McGovern, the little Brooklyn featherweight pugilist, scored another victory last night at the Lenox Athletic Club, knocking out "Patsy" Haley, of Buffalo, after forty-eight seconds of fighting in the eighteenth round. It was a hot battle, and Haley, though defeated, was by no means disgraced. He made a grand stand, and showed great cleverness with his hands and feet. His foot work was superb, but his blows lacked strength, and therein lies the cause of his defeat. McGovern's blows were remarkable for their force, and every one counted. At times Haley outpointed him, but he always had a hard blow ready. When he delivered the knockout blow, a right on the jaw, the Brooklyn boy was apparently as strong as when the fight began.

The conditions of the contest called for twenty-five rounds at 116 pounds. Both weighed in at that figure. Haley was the taller and had the longer reach. He also appeared to be the heavier. The opinion of the leading prize fight experts, as expressed immediately after the battle, is that McGovern is a world beater, and that he can beat "Pedlar" Palmer, the champion of England.

McGovern was the favorite in the betting, $100 to $60 being offered when the boys went into the ring.

The eighteenth and what proved to be the final round was very brief. Haley, who was suffering keenly from the blows he received in the preceding round, was unsteady, while McGovern was almost as fresh and as strong as at the start. "Mac" opened hostilities in brisk style. He immediately landed the left on the jaw, and sent Haley to the ropes. As the Buffalo boy rebounded, "Mac" smashed him hard on the jaw with the right, and Haley went down and out. Time of this round, 48 seconds.

In the preliminary bout, "Dan" Dougherty, of Philadelphia, knocked out "Jim" Johnson, of New York, in nine rounds. They met at 108 pounds.1899-03-15 The New York Times (New York, NY) (page 8)
McGOVERN KNOCKS OUT HALEY.
--------
The Buffalo Man Loses the Fight in the Eighteenth Round.

"Terry" McGovern of Brooklyn and "Patsey" Haley of Buffalo put up the best fight for eighteen rounds last night that the patrons of the Lenox Athletic Club have ever seen. The boys were matched to go twenty-five rounds at 116 pounds, but a neat left hook on the jaw, followed by a straight right punch on the point of the chin, after forty-eight seconds of fighting in the eighteenth round, sent Haley unconscious on the ropes, and he was counted out and the decision given to McGovern.

The fight from the start was a lively scientific contest. The men appeared to be about evenly matched as to weight, height, and reach, and both showed up as very clever boxers. They sparred lightly for the first two rounds, but in the third they warmed up to their work and mixed matters up. McGovern struck Haley several blows low enough to have been counted as fouls, but it was apparent that they were accidental, and the boys were told by "Charley" White, the referee, to box on.

The fourth round came near being the last, for if the bell had not sounded Haley would probably have been counted out. Haley was the aggressor at the beginning of the round, and sent a hard left-hand swing into McGovern's stomach, but the latter reciprocated a second later with a similar blow. He followed this up with four left swings to the body and jaw. Haley went down three times in succession, and had risen and was endeavoring weakly to defend himself from the knockout that seemed almost inevitable when the gong sounded. Haley brightened up after the fifth round and landed harder and more repeatedly than earlier, and through the succeeding rounds and up to the time he was knocked out he showed improvement.

McGoorty
10-08-2011, 09:15 AM
1885-05-04 Nonpareil Jack Dempsey W-KO5 Tom Barry [Mechanics***8217; Pavilion, San Francisco, CA, USA]
1885-05-05 Daily Alta California (San Francisco, CA) (page 1)
THE WHITE FEATHER.
------
Harry Downie Backs Out of the Match with Jack Dempsey.

Up to half-past 9 o'clock last night a comparatively small audience had gathered in the Pavilion to witness the glove contest between Jack Dempsey, light-weight champion of America, and Harry Downie, middle-weight, of this city. At the hour mentioned the admission was lowered to fifty cents, but the doors were rushed and the crowd of "waits" poured in free of charge. The event of the evening was preceded by sparring exhibitions between the following local sloggers: Tom Kelly and a stranger from Butchertown, George Hamill and Ed. McDonald, Bill Price (colored) and June Dennis (colored.) These latter two began to exhibit so much pugnacity that Captain Douglas ordered them out of the ring. James Maloney and Joe Brown then followed as feather-weights. It was then announced by Ed. Willis that Harry Downie had left the Pavilion, giving as a reason that so many people had come in free that he did not propose to fight. The terms of the match were that the winner should receive seventy per cent. of the net receipts and the loser thirty per cent. The news of Downie's defection was greeted with groans and hisses. Harry Maynard was called for, and finally made up a match between Dempsey and Tom Barry, by agreeing to pay Barry $250 whether he won or lost.

Maynard also stated that he would never again make any match with Downie, and would, furthermore use every endeavor to prevent any one else doing so. At 10:40 o'clock Dempsey and Barry stepped into the ring. Barry was seconded by Munice Leo and Pete Lawler. Dempsey was seconded by Charles Taylor and Martin Murphy. Mike Cleary was selected to act as referee. The first round opened with cautions work, but Barry soon began to force the work and was sent flying through the ropes clear off the stage, not so much by a blow as by a rush and shove. Barry was back in a moment, but got a blow on his neck that felled him, but he was on his feet in a second. During this first round Barry very cleverly stopped some hard and well-directed blows. The little work that Dempsey did showed him to be a thorough master in the science of pugilism. He played with Barry as easily and unconcernedly as a cat would with a mouse. The second round was not of an exciting nature, and it was evident that Barry, while he forced the work, was in considerable awe of Dempsey's long left-handed reach. The third round was equally tame, Dempsey giving one or two specimens of in-fighting, and Barry standing well up to his work. The fourth round was but a repetition of the third, although Barry began to fail somewhat. The fifth round had scarcely opened before Dempsey dropped his left into Barry's neck and the latter staggered back in a dazed manner; another similar blow and Barry showed symptoms of a strong desire to remain seated on the floor, but finally stood up and received a gentle blow on the neck that knocked him out of time. Under the circumstances Barry did very well, although it was evident that he is no match for Dempsey, even at his best.

Maynard feels very sore over the way in which the crowd rushed the doors and charges certain parties with having put up a job on him. Downie sent word to the Pavilion, after he had gone away, that he would return and fight Dempsey if he was guaranteed $500 whether he won or lost.


1885-05-05 Daily Evening Bulletin (San Francisco, CA) (page 1)
Exciting Glove Contest at the Pavilion.

There was not a large paying audience at the Pavilion last evening to see the glove fight between Harry Downie and Jack Dempsey. The money came in so slowly that the price was reduced to fifty cents; but this reduction was not satisfactory, and a rush was made for the doors and the waiting crowd affected an entrance without money and without price. After some sparring it was announced that Harry Downie had left the Pavilion, giving as a reason that so many people had come in free that he did not propose to fight. A messenger was dispatched to Downey's retreat, but the derelict pugilist sent back word that he wanted the guarantee of $500 before he would appear in the ring. Tom Barry volunteered to take Downey's place if guaranteed $250 whether he won or lost. Maynard accepted the proposition and the contest soon began. The contest proved to be one of the most exciting that have been seen here. Although Barry had not been in training, he made a plucky fight, and forced his antagonist to do his best. After an exchange of blows which did not do any particular damage, Dempsey rushed at Barry and drove him backward with a left and right clean through the ropes and off the stage to the floor five feet below. The fall was so severe that it was thought for a moment that the fight was over, but Barry unexpectedly bounded back to the stage smiling, and rushed fiercely at his opponent. In the fourth round it seemed as if Dempsey could knock out his man whenever he pleased, bu the champion was magnanimous and refrained from punishing him. In the fifth and last round Barry was so plainly at the mercy of the New Yorker that Dempsey dropped his hands and made no attempt to strike his helpless opponent. Barry would not yield, however, and the champion gave him a shove which overturned him. The shock revived Barry and when he rose he rushed determinedly at Dempsey, who met him with a well-directed right-hander that laid the local man on his back and ended the fight.

McGoorty
10-09-2011, 11:05 AM
Mysterious Billy SMITH Vs George GREEN a.k.a. Young CORBETTTHE TOLEDO COMMERCIAL
THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 18, 1897
BILLY SMITH vs GEORGE GREEN IT WAS GREEN'S FIGHT.
Took Him Eleven Rounds
to Make Smith Quit

_ Carson, March 17. - The fight between
"Mysterious" Billy Smith and George
Green, welterweights, followed im-
mediately, Smith had the worst of it
until the end of the eleventh round
when he gave up the fight, saying that
his arm had been broken in the fourth
round.
_ Malachy Hogan, of Chicago, was
referee, and he had his hands full. The
men clinched repeatedly and were
loath to break away. Smith devoted most of his attention to in-fighting,
and in the clinches would grab Green
around the neck and with his right
arm free, play a tattoo on the San
Francisco boy's ribs. Green constantly
jabbed with his left and soon had
Smith's nose and mouth in a pulpy
condition. It was noticeable that Smith
refrained from using his left arm
which had been broken three months
ago, and he could only hand an occa-
sional right swing.
_ Round 1 - The men clinched immedi-
ately and Smith commenced his work
on Green's ribs. On the break away
Green punished Smith in the stomach,
Both throw blows to the body.
_ Rounds 2, 3, 4 and 5 were a succes-
sion of clinches and jabs by Green.
_ Round 6 - Smith went to the floor
a result of a left hand punch in the
face. The "mysterious" man seemed
very tired and hung to Green as long
as he could in the clinches. As the
round closed he landed on Green's
jaw but did no damage.
_ Round 7 - Smith rushed matters a
bit but was ineffectual until the end of
the round when he sent Green's head
back with his right on the mouth.
_ Round 8 - In a wrestle Smith was
thrown. Green then tried for a knock-
out, but missed.
_ Round 9 - Green played constantly
for the stomach, but Smith managed
to block him every time.
_ In the 10th round Green had it near-
ly all his own way, landing two lefts
on the head and body that badly de-
moralized Smith, who appealed to the
referee for protection.
_ Round 11 - Green wanted to end the
affair and rushed Smith against the
ropes. Smith got in his right twice on
Green's neck and was jabbed in the
stomach. Smith was very tired, and
when the bell rang and he had gone
to his corner his seconds threw up the
sponge, and the fight was given to
Green. :boxing:

McGoorty
10-09-2011, 10:40 PM
1918-06-11 Jack Britton W-PTS12 Bryan Downey [Armory Athletic Association, Boston, MA, USA]
1918-06-12 The Boston Daily Globe (Boston, MA) (page 6)
BRITTON WHIPS DOWNEY EASING UP
--------
Could Have Stopped Him in Armory A. A. Bout
--------
Shows a Hard Punch Despite Fall That Dazed Him
--------
Jack Britton of Chicago found Bryan Downey of Columbus easy game for him in their bout at the Armory A. A. last night and was given the decision in 12 rounds.

That Britton could have stopped Downey was the opinion of the fans. For the first three sessions the latter showed up well. He started to force the boxing, but in the fourth Britton got busy and from that time on made Downey look like a third-rater.

In the 10th, Britton had Downey in a bad way, but when it looked as if he could knock him out, he lessened the force in his punches.

Downey was in such a shape at times that the spectators yelled to the referee to stop the bout.

In the second round Britton, in making a lunge at Downey, slipped out of the ring and struck his head on the floor. He was dazed for an instant, but returned to the ring in a few seconds.

The preliminary between Mike Snyder and Jack Fallon was a great bout. Both little fellows fought fast and hard, Fallon scoring a knockdown in the sixth. At the end of six rounds it was called a draw. Joe Rivers of Gloucester defeated Panama Joe Gans in eight rounds, and Mike Castle stopped Young Sharkey of New Bedford in four.

Johnny Dundee and Young Britt will box in the feature bout at the club next Tuesday night. Shaver O'Brien and Sam Bell will meet in the semi-final; Billy Roberts and Jack Mansfield in one preliminary and Young Veira and Young Bruno in the other.


1918-06-12 The Evening Times (Pawtucket, RI) (page 10)
JACK BRITTON IS DOWNEY'S MASTER
--------
BOSTON, June 12.--Jack Britton, the master, overwhelmingly defeated Bryan Downey in a 12-round bout at the Armory A. A. last night. Downey looked and fought like an apprentice against the skill and superior ring craft of the former welterweight champion. The Columbus boxer had superb courage, otherwise he never would have lasted through. He fought one of the gamest up-hill battles ever seen in a local ring.

Panama Joe Gans substituted for Victor Dahl against Joe Rivers and lost the decision to the Gloucester man in an eight-round fight.

Mike Snyder and Johnny Fallon fought a fast six rounds to a draw and Mike Castle proved too fast for Young Sharkey and was given the verdict in the fourth round.

McGoorty
10-12-2011, 05:52 AM
THE PHILADELPHIA RECORD
THURSDAY, MARCH 16, 1911

CLAIMS CHAMPIONSHIP
Packey McFarland Thinks Lightweight
Honors Are His
_ New York, March 15. - Packey Mc-
Farland, flushed with his victory over
Owen Moran, now claims he is the only
real simon pure light-weight champion
boxer of the world.
_ "I can fight at the American light-weight
limit, 133 pounds," said McFarland. And,
what is more, I am willing to do so. I
never have been beaten and I think this
record counts for something, inasmuch
as I have earned decisions over men who
have been champions."
_ To substantiate his claims Packey point-
ed out that Kid Lavigne, Frank Erne and
Joe Gans all fought and won the title
at 135 and 136 pounds.
_ McFarland's victory over Moran in the
10-round bout decided last evening, was
decisive, and leaves no doubt as to which
is the better man. The pace was fast.
Moran, standing straight and fighting like
a little bulldog, was bewildered by Mc-
Farland's speed, but he tried his best
every inch of the way. Packey made him
miss swing after swing, yet Moran smiled
confidently as he tried the next one.
Packey seemed to like the infighting quite
as well as Moran, and he had the best
of it. He always managed to land sev-
eral blows for Moran's one, and they were
snappy, stinging punches that would have
worn down any fighter less enduring than
the game little Briton.
_ Packey would hold his long left out,
push it against Moran's head, so that
said block would bend backwards and
then he'd shoot the right either to the
chin or body.
_ In the fifth round Packey brought a
hard swinging upper cut, landed under
Moran's chin and fairly lifted him from
his feet.
_ The sixth was a hot session. Packey
started out as if intent upon landing a
knockout. He put in several hard straight
rights, and Moran ducked out of danger
so cleverly that the crowd gave him a
rattle of applause. Moran came back with
hard swings, which Packey ducked in turn.
Then Packey started an aggressive rush
that forced Moran into a corner. Before
he could recover or slip aside Packey
swung a right uppercut. The blow caught
Owen on the chin and lifting him from
his feet tossed him through the ropes.
He fell in a sitting position outside on
the edge of the platform, with his legs
over the lower rope of the ring. For a
moment Owen looked up with a grin,
and then he scrambled back through the
ropes and danced away from Packey's
eager rush.
_ There was no let-up. McFarland was
rushing continually, pawing with his left,
shooting rights over, landing uppercuts
as he came close, and punching Moran's
body as they came to a clinch. Near the
end of the seventh the result of the pun-
ishment showed. Moran was weak and a
little slow. He soon recovered.
_ From that time on there wasn't a dull
second. McFarland was trying his best,
and Moran stood up against his rushes,
rushed now and then himself and fought
like a game****. The end of the tenth
round found McFarland with a big lead,
but Moran smiling and dancing about as
****ily as ever.

McGoorty
10-17-2011, 10:52 PM
SMITH v. CROUSE.
NZ Truth , Issue 582, 12 August 1916, Page 11
About this newspaper

Back to issue contents

Article view

SMITH v. CROUSE.
New Zealander Victorious. ,_, - Knock* tho American m the Fourth SVi^f.r- -Round, n..:....;'. ***9632;***9632;***9632;***9632;• 'y (By Special Cable.) The Sydney Stadium, on Saturday night last, provided the fight sensation of the year, when the" New Zealander, Dave Smith, accounted for the American, Buck Crouse, m the fourth round. ' .***9632;-***9632;'.-...-. . 1 The same'pair figured at the Stadium a few weeks ago, and, on that occasion, Smith, after banging and smashing for nine rounds, and being banged and' smashed m return, was forced to quit, It being apparent that inVjtdrcihg the, fight he had taken on too'big a contract, whereas if he had boxed the American, he would have finished up an easy winner on points. Consequently, the return .match of the pair on Saturday night did not appeal too strongly to the fans, who regarded the result as being a foregone conclusion for the American, and, comparatively speaking,' the crowd of 4000 present was small. - ***9632;'' = That the previous performances of. a boxer, or bdxers, is the worst thing to judge on, was manifested by the fetult on Saturday night, because Smith, whose injuries, received at the hands of both Les Darcy and Buck Crouse, had healed and had completely ..vanished, entered the ring as fit • and * well as ever before m his existence* »' The weights were: Smith, 11.10: Crouse, 12.4. The fight was short, but it was fierce. Smith fought like a veritable tornado, and m the first round, Just before the itbell, the American was toppled over. The second round was even more furious, the third being a very bad one for the American. The fourth proved the last. : Smith f| If ought with devij, sending oveK left "and right to the American's face. -,»Twice Crouse was dropped for nine (! seconds. The third time he was clouted out, and Smith,, amidst the greatest excitement, bowed his acknowledgement of the plaudits of the excited and crazy crowd. As the winner op the fight is to be "'matched to meet the champion,; Le» Darcy, at Brisbane, during Exhibition week, it means that; Dave Sm|th Is to be. given another chance to wrest tbe middleweight title from the young cfarmptoa. : ***9632;•

McGoorty
10-22-2011, 12:42 PM
THE BOSTON HERALD
THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 1893
ROBERT FITZSIMMONS vs JAMES HALL


ONE ON THE JAW
Fitz Finished Hall in
the Fourth Round.
It Was a Crushing,
Knock-Out Blow.
Hall Was Unconscious
for Many Minutes.
No One Expected
Such a Turn.
Fitzsimmons Fought Better
Than Ever Before,
While the Other Made a
Very Poor Showing.
The Result Was Hardly in
Doubt at Any Time.
Most of the Northern Men
Lost in the Result.
A $25,000 Crowd to Offset
a $40,000 Purse

Hall seemed the more confident of the two. He hardly looked at Fitzsimmons, but the latter eyed him eagerly, with his usual peculiar stare, his mouth half open like a child

Hall gave Fitz a slight one on the neck and ran away. Bob pursued him, landing on the neck, nose and side, the last being a heavy blow - the first struck during the fight. Fitzsimmons landed again on the neck. when Hall ran, but he followed him and got in four light blows in rapid succession...
Suddenly Fritz's right shot out like a piston rod. Hall was not expecting it, and it landed with a crushing force. The mass of bone and muscle caught Hall on the point of his jaw. The blow was heard in the remotest part of the ring. Hall quivered after receiving the blow. He fell Backwards like a log, his head striking the cork floor with a resounding thud.