View Full Version : Weight training for boxing


CymruAmByth
06-19-2011, 11:27 AM
Before anyone pipes up, i've used the search tool and have read alot about this subject. Problem is, there's so many different people with so many different opinions that it's confused the sh it out of me. You get the people who believe lift heavy with less reps, those who say lift light with more reps and then the people who, for some reason, believe weight training is bad for boxing. Can someone who actually KNOWS what they're talking about (not think they know what they're talking about, KNOWS) please shed some light on this for me?? At the moment i'm 79kg, but i can get down to 72-73 so i don't mind putting on a few kg's of muscle to get back up to 75.

Thanks in advance

CAB

Major Motoko
06-19-2011, 11:29 AM
Before anyone pipes up, i've used the search tool and have read alot about this subject. Problem is, there's so many different people with so many different opinions that it's confused the sh it out of me. You get the people who believe lift heavy with less reps, those who say lift light with more reps and then the people who, for some reason, believe weight training is bad for boxing. Can someone who actually KNOWS what they're talking about (not think they know what they're talking about, KNOWS) please shed some light on this for me?? At the moment i'm 79kg, but i can get down to 72-73 so i don't mind putting on a few kg's of muscle to get back up to 75.

Thanks in advance

CAB

I wan't to know about this too. Anyone who knows, come on lets hear it.:boxing:

Spartacus Sully
06-19-2011, 02:36 PM
boxers have allways used weights both heavy and light from sparring partners, to heavy bags, to push ups , to pull ups, to gloves, to medicine balls, to situps.

theres no need to go out and lift heavy with low reps or light with high reps, just train.

if you really want to gain some muscle, look into plyo, like sprinting intervals, clap push ups, depth jumps, medicine ball throws, jump squats, ect before you look into lifting free weights at a weight gym.

CymruAmByth
06-19-2011, 04:21 PM
boxers have allways used weights both heavy and light from sparring partners, to heavy bags, to push ups , to pull ups, to gloves, to medicine balls, to situps.

theres no need to go out and lift heavy with low reps or light with high reps, just train.

if you really want to gain some muscle, look into plyo, like sprinting intervals, clap push ups, depth jumps, medicine ball throws, jump squats, ect before you look into lifting free weights at a weight gym.

Not the kind of reply i was looking for but thanks anyway. I've been looking at med. ball workouts and plyometrics. Think i'm gonna buy a couple when i get paid.

Spartacus Sully
06-19-2011, 04:39 PM
Not the kind of reply i was looking for but thanks anyway. I've been looking at med. ball workouts and plyometrics. Think i'm gonna buy a couple when i get paid.

if youve used the search feature and the tens of hundreds of the exact same thread hasnt given you the answer you looking for....chances are 1 more thread isnt going to do it either.

CymruAmByth
06-19-2011, 05:00 PM
if youve used the search feature and the tens of hundreds of the exact same thread hasnt given you the answer you looking for....chances are 1 more thread isnt going to do it either.

No harm in trying.

Spartacus Sully
06-19-2011, 05:06 PM
No harm in trying.

too many cooks spoil the soup

CymruAmByth
06-19-2011, 05:13 PM
too many cooks spoil the soup

The soup sucked anyway ;)

JHAVIS
06-19-2011, 05:40 PM
If you wanna gain mass, lift heavy. if you're looking to get toned and defined you either do high reps or circuit train. I use to train a boxer years ago and I have have do high reps of the exercise were doing then without rest he would grab some 5lbs weights and shadow box for 2 mins. He really enjoyed the training and said he wad able to bully and out power his opponents. Make all your moves explosive.

CymruAmByth
06-19-2011, 05:44 PM
If you wanna gain mass, lift heavy. if you're looking to get toned and defined you either do high reps or circuit train. I use to train a boxer years ago and I have have do high reps of the exercise were doing then without rest he would grab some 5lbs weights and shadow box for 2 mins. He really enjoyed the training and said he wad able to bully and out power his opponents. Make all your moves explosive.

Sorry, i should have made this clearer in my first post. It's speed and power i'm looking to gain, not muscle. I was merely saying that i didn't mind gaining a bit

JHAVIS
06-19-2011, 05:55 PM
Sorry, i should have made this clearer in my first post. It's speed and power i'm looking to gain, not muscle. I was merely saying that i didn't mind gaining a bit

Use high reps and make your moves explosive. Showdow box with 2-5lbs weights. Shadow boxing with weights will make the gloves feel like pillows on your hands. Lifting weights does help you with boxing.

RurouniYume
06-19-2011, 06:11 PM
some food for thought:

Muhammad Ali didn't lift weights and he was very fast, agile, and quite powerful and stayed around 205 lbs, not a huge amount of muscle mass.

Mike Tyson lifted heavy and... shouldn't have to tell you about him:

http://brevheart.tripod.com/TYSONhome.jpg

SonnyDempsey
06-19-2011, 07:03 PM
Short answer is: do all the above.

Lift heavy, lift light. Mix it up as often as possible.

Jack3d
06-19-2011, 09:25 PM
Heavy Compound Lifting (3-5 Range)
Sprints
Lots of Stretching



all this crap with high reps and low weight and shadow boxing w/ 2lbs is not going make you stronger or faster.

Big BRICKS
06-20-2011, 12:12 AM
Plyometrics...

F l i c k e r
06-20-2011, 12:27 AM
I'm tired of seeing retards on boxingscene act like weight lifting is unwarranted. That's stupid and backwards ass thinking. Every elite athlete lifts some sort of weight, whether it's heavy or light. From sprinters, to tennis players, to footballers, to NFL players, to swimmers, to boxers. It's called conditioning and lifting weights happens to help you condition at a faster rate.

Anyways. It all depends on HOW YOU LIFT THE WEIGHTS. I will tell you(TS) how each one works and what your results will be.


Lifting Heavy w/ few reps You lift really fast and reset slow. This will get you explosive, fast-twitch muscle. If you include proper cardio training, you'll end up looking like Sergio, Mosley, or Zab. Tight, dense, muscle. The way many men want to look. If you don't include proper cardio, you'll end up like Berto. Fast twitch muscle simply happens to be bigger muscle.

Lifting light w/ many reps You lift really fast and reset moderately slow. This won't result in explosive muscle. Instead it builds slow twitch, endurance muscle. You'll get long, lean muscle. You'll end up looking like Marquez or Margarito. Thin body, muscle is obviously there but it's not dense. It's thin. Slow twitch muscle just happens to be thin.

Not lifting weights. You can get away with not lifting weights at all but that is ancient method of training. You won't ever reach elite athletic ability but you can still be a very good sport specific player. Which, if you were a real athlete, wouldn't be content with.

Every REAL athlete wants to be THE best. They compete and want to compete THE best they can. So, they separate themselves from the old thinking and really look into real conditioning. That is why all the TOP athletes today, regardless of what sport they play, have and do lift some weights in some way. That's just the way it is.

Spartacus Sully
06-20-2011, 12:50 AM
Slow twitch muscle just happens to be thin.




you use heavy weight to train fast twitch muscle thus fast twitch muscle is more likly to tear and and repair and tear and repair, giving it its density.

you train slow twitch with light weights so its less likely to tear and repair and tear and repair so it remains thin.

Josh_Shing
06-20-2011, 04:31 AM
I agree with Flicker. I'm no expert on weight lifting with boxing, but i'm an expert on what experience taught me. There's different ways to lift weights and train, and it really really depends on how you train in order to reach a specific goal.

I believe one of GSP's trainers said "If you train like the rest, you will BE like the rest." I guess it's about finding the right workout plan for what you want to do.

CymruAmByth
06-20-2011, 04:59 AM
I'm tired of seeing retards on boxingscene act like weight lifting is unwarranted. That's stupid and backwards ass thinking. Every elite athlete lifts some sort of weight, whether it's heavy or light. From sprinters, to tennis players, to footballers, to NFL players, to swimmers, to boxers. It's called conditioning and lifting weights happens to help you condition at a faster rate.

Anyways. It all depends on HOW YOU LIFT THE WEIGHTS. I will tell you(TS) how each one works and what your results will be.


Lifting Heavy w/ few reps You lift really fast and reset slow. This will get you explosive, fast-twitch muscle. If you include proper cardio training, you'll end up looking like Sergio, Mosley, or Zab. Tight, dense, muscle. The way many men want to look. If you don't include proper cardio, you'll end up like Berto. Fast twitch muscle simply happens to be bigger muscle.

Lifting light w/ many reps You lift really fast and reset moderately slow. This won't result in explosive muscle. Instead it builds slow twitch, endurance muscle. You'll get long, lean muscle. You'll end up looking like Marquez or Margarito. Thin body, muscle is obviously there but it's not dense. It's thin. Slow twitch muscle just happens to be thin.

Not lifting weights. You can get away with not lifting weights at all but that is ancient method of training. You won't ever reach elite athletic ability but you can still be a very good sport specific player. Which, if you were a real athlete, wouldn't be content with.

Every REAL athlete wants to be THE best. They compete and want to compete THE best they can. So, they separate themselves from the old thinking and really look into real conditioning. That is why all the TOP athletes today, regardless of what sport they play, have and do lift some weights in some way. That's just the way it is.

Now THAT was the kind of reply i was looking for! Very informative, thanks man. I'm guessing i'd need to stick to compound movements, deadlifts, squats, bench etc?

Spartacus Sully
06-20-2011, 05:40 AM
Now THAT was the kind of reply i was looking for! Very informative, thanks man. I'm guessing i'd need to stick to compound movements, deadlifts, squats, bench etc?

why? did you google Sergio, Mosley, Berto, or Zab's training routine and thats what you found?

I can only find vids of them training, but i cant watch vids at work so i really dont know what they do but my moneys on plyo's with maybe some weighted basics like weighted pull ups, push ups, and sit ups.

CymruAmByth
06-20-2011, 09:30 AM
why? did you google Sergio, Mosley, Berto, or Zab's training routine and thats what you found?

I can only find vids of them training, but i cant watch vids at work so i really dont know what they do but my moneys on plyo's with maybe some weighted basics like weighted pull ups, push ups, and sit ups.

Because my question was about weight training and he's given me an answer about weight training.

barfly12
06-20-2011, 09:48 AM
are Ron Lipton and Ross Enamait (rossboxing.com). Goggle them and learn.

~BoZz~
06-20-2011, 11:20 AM
I'm tired of seeing retards on boxingscene act like weight lifting is unwarranted. That's stupid and backwards ass thinking. Every elite athlete lifts some sort of weight, whether it's heavy or light. From sprinters, to tennis players, to footballers, to NFL players, to swimmers, to boxers. It's called conditioning and lifting weights happens to help you condition at a faster rate.

Anyways. It all depends on HOW YOU LIFT THE WEIGHTS. I will tell you(TS) how each one works and what your results will be.


Lifting Heavy w/ few reps You lift really fast and reset slow. This will get you explosive, fast-twitch muscle. If you include proper cardio training, you'll end up looking like Sergio, Mosley, or Zab. Tight, dense, muscle. The way many men want to look. If you don't include proper cardio, you'll end up like Berto. Fast twitch muscle simply happens to be bigger muscle.

Lifting light w/ many reps You lift really fast and reset moderately slow. This won't result in explosive muscle. Instead it builds slow twitch, endurance muscle. You'll get long, lean muscle. You'll end up looking like Marquez or Margarito. Thin body, muscle is obviously there but it's not dense. It's thin. Slow twitch muscle just happens to be thin.

Not lifting weights. You can get away with not lifting weights at all but that is ancient method of training. You won't ever reach elite athletic ability but you can still be a very good sport specific player. Which, if you were a real athlete, wouldn't be content with.

Every REAL athlete wants to be THE best. They compete and want to compete THE best they can. So, they separate themselves from the old thinking and really look into real conditioning. That is why all the TOP athletes today, regardless of what sport they play, have and do lift some weights in some way. That's just the way it is.

what do you mean with reset slow?? And how many reps should one do???

Spartacus Sully
06-20-2011, 05:10 PM
Because my question was about weight training and he's given me an answer about weight training.

ohhhh i thought it was about weight training for boxing...my mistake.

MexicanPoster
06-20-2011, 06:35 PM
the best weight trainingf is using your own weight (pull ups, push ups).

F l i c k e r
06-21-2011, 04:36 AM
the best weight trainingf is using your own weight (pull ups, push ups).

Old way of thinking.

If you want mediocre muscle development and muscle output, along with a very long development time, then go with that.

Lifting weights significantly cuts the time it takes to see results. Lifting properly will result in proper muscle. If you lift like a bodybuilder, you'll look and move like a bodybuilder. Lift with the goal in improving boxing fitness, your muscle gain will reflect all the attributes for boxing.

http://www.gifsoup.com/imager.php?id=739074&t=o(i made this)


Floyd Mayweather Jr. >>>> Anything any weight lifting nay sayer can do.

Spartacus Sully
06-21-2011, 05:17 AM
http://www.gifsoup.com/imager.php?id=739074&t=o(i made this)


Floyd Mayweather Jr. >>>> Anything any weight lifting nay sayer can do.

so high reps done at a moderate pace with 10-20 lbs on a cable machine to work the arms and upper body is the way to go?

F l i c k e r
06-21-2011, 04:03 PM
so high reps done at a moderate pace with 10-20 lbs on a cable machine to work the arms and upper body is the way to go?

If that is what your gunning for, then yes.


What Floyd is doing is endurance building. Lifting that way results in endurance, slow twitch muscle.

Now look at Floyd's body. Not very bulky. Now look at the way he boxes. Not very powerful but never gets tired.

Thank you. Come again. :fing02:

josh-hill
06-22-2011, 11:59 AM
hey man. i know a little about this, but im no expert. basicaly to put on maximum muscle do 10x3 reps. this however is not great for boxers because it trigers mostly sarcoplasmic hypertrophy (the part of the muslce that dosnt contract). by doing a 5x5 program you are more likely to trigger myofibrilar hypertrophy (contractile proteins). obviously you trigger both at the same time, but the heavier the weight the more myofibrilar. training heavy (1-5 reps) also teaches your CNS (central nervous system) to work better so that it recruits all of your availible muscle mass, instead of just some of it.

so obviously for a fighter heavy weight training is better. it makes you stronger and helps fast twitch muscle recruitment, that, in theory makes you more explosive. sarcoplasmic hypertrophy is also useful as that aids in glycogen stores and thus endurance, but that will also grow by doing 5x5.

HOWEVER by traing 5x5 you will grow at a slower rate. sarplasmic hypertrophy shows the most visible growth so thats what people target when they want to get big fast, but that muscle isnt as functional. look at the difference between powerlifters, oly weightlifters and bodybilders.

but you also need to do other things. traing at heavy wreights gives you the tools to be more explosive (more over all strength and better muscle fiber recruitment) but you still need to train your body to utilise that potential by doing things such as plyometrics.

people say weightlifting makes you slower, and this is kinda true, if you do it wrong. lots of sarcoplasmic hypertrophy will weight you down with no explosive benifits and thus make you slower. also DMOS will make you slower. DMOS (delayed muslce onset soreness) is when you ache and feel stiff after a workout. when you have it bad, its obvious and you feel slower and stiff. however after a while you dont get the soreness, you just get slight stifness. this makes people think that they arent aching and are therefore back to normal. the stifness is barely noticable. it will slow you down slightly though.

that slowness isnt permanent. have a few days of training and your speed will shoot back up, so you dont need to be worried about being slow in fights, you just might be slow in training. it may impact your training, may not, i dont know, but you can make that decision for yourself

edit: part 2. weightlifting is no different to doing push-ups, apart from you can control the weight. so you cant say push-ups are inherently good and weights inherently bad, its how you use them. its important to say that you need to mix all sorts of training. sprints for cardio, heavy lifting, plyometrics, e.c.t.

lastly make sure you work out properly. i, like many others, fell into the trap of pushing too much, and not pulling. stand normally with your hands by your sides. if your thumbs point straight forwards your fine, if they point inwards (like 90% of people i know) you have rounded shoulders. this can lead to a whole host of problems, not least it forces your body to reorganise itsself and that meens you loose stregnth and effectiveness. its realy important to train your back, and its often neglected. if you dont, injury awaits

as extra incentive, in boxing, power starts in your legs and goes through your back and core to your arms, so if you have a strong back, you will have stronger punches. its vitaly important to stay ballanced all over so make sure that however many pushes (bench press, millitary press, e.c.t.) you do an equal amount of pulls (pullups, rows e.c.t.).

lastly, dont forget the little muscles like the rear delts. these are a pain to train but are important for balance. good luck

josh-hill
06-22-2011, 12:23 PM
forgot to mention i dabbled in MMA for a while and came back to boxing. but my trainer was real strong for his size, and he was a big guy. 6'3-6'4 i think, about 185lbs. but real strong and real fast. he did 10 one rep maxes. he would pyramid up to his max weight then do that, rest and do it again. untill he had done 10 of them. he said it worked wonders, esspecialy with supersets thrown in. he also did hurricanes. i cant remeber them exactly but they where basicaly a 5 min sprint, then lifting, then a 5 min sprint, with minimal rest. realy good way of working on stregnth and cardio at once

barfly12
06-23-2011, 12:14 PM
it clears up a lot of the nonsense about high reps:

http://forums.doghouseboxing.com/index.php?showtopic=19149

Jack3d
06-25-2011, 03:52 PM
it clears up a lot of the nonsense about high reps:

http://forums.doghouseboxing.com/index.php?showtopic=19149

I've been saying the same stuff it this article forever. Hopefully now some people will take heed and listen or at least give it a try. If Ross isn't considered a reliable source for info on these types than I don't know who is. Of course there are more experienced strength experts out there for combat sports (like Martin Rooney) but Ross is very good.

However his choice of exercises are rather limited. I don't see how he could have left out Squats and Deadlifts but kept the Bench Press. I know Ross himself doesn't normally deadlift (as hes made this clear in some of his videos), but I'd definitely say Squats and Deadlifts are better for a boxer or athlete in general than a Bench Press. More so the Squat.

barfly12
06-27-2011, 08:44 AM
but some of us, like me, due to back injuries cannot do either squats or deadlfts. I have bulging disks that leak when I do either. But for most people, yes, do em.