View Full Version : Weight Training


BadLeftHook
05-18-2011, 11:47 AM
Could someone tell me what sort of weight training is appropriate for Boxing. I'm only 15 and started Boxing a few months ago but I'm worried that the type of weight training I do will hinder me instead of helping me when it comes to Boxing.

I got the workout off a body-building website a short while before I started Boxing. It is more or less the advanced-intermediate workout from the website Sccobysworkshop only changed around a little, no leg workouts etc.

I understand that body building training is bad for boxing but I had already started and I didn't want to stop. Also, I figured it might be okay because I am still young and growing?


PS- I am not the real BadLeftHook:P I just thought it was a cool name.

holmeslaw
05-19-2011, 05:37 PM
Check this video out, should be a good start, I do this 2 or 3 times a week after my boxing training:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-u8Re0bFz4&feature=related

It's about build stamina, speed, explosiveness.

Keep the weights light, lots of reps.

fordhamboxing
05-19-2011, 05:42 PM
Could someone tell me what sort of weight training is appropriate for Boxing. I'm only 15 and started Boxing a few months ago but I'm worried that the type of weight training I do will hinder me instead of helping me when it comes to Boxing.

I got the workout off a body-building website a short while before I started Boxing. It is more or less the advanced-intermediate workout from the website Sccobysworkshop only changed around a little, no leg workouts etc.

I understand that body building training is bad for boxing but I had already started and I didn't want to stop. Also, I figured it might be okay because I am still young and growing?


PS- I am not the real BadLeftHook:P I just thought it was a cool name.

If you get that body building training is bad for boxing then if I were you'd I'd just embrace that. I never really use weights, 95% pushups, pullups, chinups, dips, squats, etc. The only time I use weights is for ab stuff and sometimes I shadowbox with both hands holding a 10 pound dumbbell. All about that lean, explosive muscle

BadLeftHook
05-20-2011, 08:16 AM
Check this video out, should be a good start, I do this 2 or 3 times a week after my boxing training:

It's about build stamina, speed, explosiveness.

Keep the weights light, lots of reps.

It's not letting me watch the video.

How should I do the reps, for body building you are meant to it as slow as possible so should I do it faster for Boxing?

BadLeftHook
05-20-2011, 08:17 AM
If you get that body building training is bad for boxing then if I were you'd I'd just embrace that. I never really use weights, 95% pushups, pullups, chinups, dips, squats, etc. The only time I use weights is for ab stuff and sometimes I shadowbox with both hands holding a 10 pound dumbbell. All about that lean, explosive muscle

I get that its bad I was just confused as to if it would really matter at my age.

any craic lad?
05-20-2011, 08:28 AM
I can testify that doing weights the body building way is bad for boxing.I was trying to build muscle for other sports by lifting weights like dumbells and i always do a little bit of boxing each day on my heavy bag since i started doing weights my stamima in boxing has decreased dramitically.As the poster above said push up's are far better for boxing then weight's

BadLeftHook
05-20-2011, 08:35 AM
I can testify that doing weights the body building way is bad for boxing.I was trying to build muscle for other sports by lifting weights like dumbells and i always do a little bit of boxing each day on my heavy bag since i started doing weights my stamima in boxing has decreased dramitically.As the poster above said push up's are far better for boxing then weight's

So just don't lift weights at all? Like you the reason I wanted to build muscle was for another sport but I don't actually play it anymore since I started focusing on Boxing.

fordhamboxing
05-20-2011, 09:54 AM
So just don't lift weights at all? Like you the reason I wanted to build muscle was for another sport but I don't actually play it anymore since I started focusing on Boxing.

If you're going to focus on boxing than absolutely you can stop with the weights. You'd be surprised what a workout you can get from the weight of your body too.

BadLeftHook
05-20-2011, 10:23 AM
If you're going to focus on boxing than absolutely you can stop with the weights. You'd be surprised what a workout you can get from the weight of your body too.

I'll do that then. I'll make a work out plan later today to start next week that involves more natural excercises. I don't want to get to big anyway, I'd rather fight at a lower weight. (I presume if I lifted weights reguarly for a few years I'd be much bigger than I want to be)

ChiTown2Diego
05-20-2011, 06:24 PM
I train athletes (high school and collegiate) in various sports and have trained a few pro athletes. Best thing you can do is hire a trainer in your area that specializes in sports specific training. Most people in here will try to help but the truth is that taking advice from a forum will get you nowhere. You've already received advice here that isn't completely accurate.

I know most people will ask themselves why pay a trainer when they can simply do pushups on their own... I promise you that the biggest mistake I see over and over in the programs being used is wasting time. Waste of time because they are using methods proven ineffective (along with bad form most of the time) and improper application as it applies to specific sport goals.

Most trainers will allow you a free or discounted introductory session. That would give you an idea of what their style is, the methods used and you'll be able to pick the trainer's brain. Even if it's cost prohibitive for you I would still suggest you find a way to make it happen. Come up with a way to buy a couple sessions, a week's, month or whatever you can squeeze out. This will allow you a proper start. Take what you've learned and use it in your own training until you've researched and gathered additional training knowledge.

Weight training is not bad for boxing. It's all about the approach and proper application. Sports science is advanced enough that a competent trainer can create a roadmap to your specific goals by employing different methodologies and applications that have been scientifically proven to produce specific results. Weight training as it would be applied to boxing by most trainers would make up only a minimal part of a boxing training program. Dismissing it all together (when applied correctly) would be sacrificing improvement to an overall balanced development.

BadLeftHook
05-21-2011, 06:02 AM
I train athletes (high school and collegiate) in various sports and have trained a few pro athletes. Best thing you can do is hire a trainer in your area that specializes in sports specific training. Most people in here will try to help but the truth is that taking advice from a forum will get you nowhere. You've already received advice here that isn't completely accurate.

I know most people will ask themselves why pay a trainer when they can simply do pushups on their own... I promise you that the biggest mistake I see over and over in the programs being used is wasting time. Waste of time because they are using methods proven ineffective (along with bad form most of the time) and improper application as it applies to specific sport goals.

Most trainers will allow you a free or discounted introductory session. That would give you an idea of what their style is, the methods used and you'll be able to pick the trainer's brain. Even if it's cost prohibitive for you I would still suggest you find a way to make it happen. Come up with a way to buy a couple sessions, a week's, month or whatever you can squeeze out. This will allow you a proper start. Take what you've learned and use it in your own training until you've researched and gathered additional training knowledge.

Weight training is not bad for boxing. It's all about the approach and proper application. Sports science is advanced enough that a competent trainer can create a roadmap to your specific goals by employing different methodologies and applications that have been scientifically proven to produce specific results. Weight training as it would be applied to boxing by most trainers would make up only a minimal part of a boxing training program. Dismissing it all together (when applied correctly) would be sacrificing improvement to an overall balanced development.

Thanks for the reply. I'm not sure about that though, I would have to wait until I had saved up a lot of money and that could take time. I think I'll wait until I can legally get a job(a few months) and then save up a bit of money. Then I'll see about a trainer.

TheAuthority
05-21-2011, 06:26 AM
I would recommend buying a book called "Infinite Intensity" by Ross enamait.

It covers both strength and conditioning and will give you a very good insight into what sort of training will be most beneficial. There's a 50 day strength and conditioning plan, but you will learn how to put together your own work outs specifically taylored to your own needs.

If you are serious about your training, this book will be a very wise INVESTMENT. Buy it !!!

Jack3d
05-21-2011, 08:45 PM
Check this video out, should be a good start, I do this 2 or 3 times a week after my boxing training:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-u8Re0bFz4&feature=related

It's about build stamina, speed, explosiveness.

Keep the weights light, lots of reps.

Reps build stamina. They don't build explosiveness or speed

them_apples
05-22-2011, 02:04 AM
Reps build stamina. They don't build explosiveness or speed

they can. Doing anything explosively builds speed. Why not build speed and stamina at the same time. Boxers have been doing high reps since the beginning of time and are still the quickest most agile athletes in the world. Pacquiao and Mayweather, probably the 2 quickest boxers around today, both don't do any high weight training at all. Just explosive exsersizes, sometimes with only 4-5 lb hand weights.

That whole high weight low reps for speed is mostly the new age excuse for boxers and MMA fighters to put on muscle and look big and ripped. It's really not cut out for boxing. High weight forces you to be explosive because its heavy, doesn't mean you cant do it with light weights - many more times.