View Full Version : British: Founders of Modern Boxing??


boxingking500
04-05-2011, 12:56 AM
someone told me, that the british are the ones that kind of started "modern boxing" i mean boxing has been here for thousnads of years, the ancient greeks used to box in there olympic games, but im talking about the "modern boxing" did they really create the foundation of "modern boxing" you know with rings, belts, etc. etc. or is that just a myth

Spartacus Sully
04-05-2011, 01:06 AM
someone told me, that the british are the ones that kind of started "modern boxing" i mean boxing has been here for thousnads of years, the ancient greeks used to box in there olympic games, but im talking about the "modern boxing" did they really create the foundation of "modern boxing" you know with rings, belts, etc. etc. or is that just a myth

james figg was from england, he was a fencer and the first to open a "boxing gym" in 1720

Jack broughton was from england, he was the first to create an actuall set of rules for boxing called broughton rules whcih eventually became knows as london prize ring rules, these set of rules lasted from 1747-1838 where they were revised and revised again in 1853.

John graham chambers was from england, in 1865 he came up with the Queensberry rules for the sport of boxing. John Douglas, the 9th Marquess of Queensberry, publicy endorsed these rules and so they became known as the marquess of queensberry rules.

boxingking500
04-05-2011, 01:23 AM
james figg was from england, he was a fencer and the first to open a "boxing gym" in 1720

Jack broughton was from england, he was the first to create an actuall set of rules for boxing called broughton rules whcih eventually became knows as london prize ring rules, these set of rules lasted from 1747-1838 where they were revised and revised again in 1853.

John graham chambers was from england, in 1865 he came up with the Queensberry rules for the sport of boxing. John Douglas, the 9th Marquess of Queensberry, publicy endorsed these rules and so they became known as the marquess of queensberry rules.

so basically britian is the home of modern boxing, they layed the foundation for it...???

GrandpaBernard
04-05-2011, 01:58 AM
so basically britian is the home of modern boxing, they layed the foundation for it...???

Yup, the Romans "destroyed" boxing. They turned a Greek sport into a fight to the death.

Marchegiano
04-05-2011, 02:06 AM
Fencing in general kind of laid the foundation for it. I think it's more fair to say the British' rules were used in most other parts, but that doesn't negate the actual origins of the boxers. Quite a few boxers during the early days of English prizefighting weren't English. Certainly the Irish, and French. I guess I'm saying it's fair to give the British credit for the governing body end of it, but the talent and skill development is just like you said "ancient". Boxing was a non-lethal method to strengthen a soilder's ability to move a weapon, and increase the amount of damage the soilder can take. The Spartans started it. The Roman's adapted it, and due to the nature of their empire boxing poped up every where Rome had influence. From the Egyptains to the Russians and every where in between. As fencing with a sword became a more popular sport amonst aristocracies fencing with fists gained a place as a poor man's sport. With fencing came the idea that the boxer could dodge, and parry attacks. The ancient boxers wanted to be hit to gain resistance. As guns start to take over duels fencing loses influence over prizefighting, and fighters begin to develope a system of fist fighting purely for the sport of fist fighting, and not just a means to develope other skills. So there ya go boxing history from ancient Greece to about the 1700's as best as I can remember. sorry if it's all jumbled and doesn't make great sense. I've a lot of books and just kind of responded by memory. A well thought out post would take alot of time.

$BloodyNate$
04-05-2011, 04:32 AM
Yup, the Romans "destroyed" boxing. They turned a Greek sport into a fight to the death.

DUDE! That's ****in awesome hahaha that'd be crazy as hell to watch. I rather watch that then ANY Wlad or Calzaghe fight ANYDAY of the week.

GJC
04-05-2011, 06:45 AM
Daniel Mendoza and Jem Mace were a couple of influential fighters with regard to the development of more modern skills in boxing. Both English of course :)
A note to our American cousins re the whole English/British thing. When an Englishman wins he is English, when a scots/Irish/welsh man wins he is British. If however they lose they revert to being scots/Irish/welsh.
Just in case you ever got confused by the nationality changes we use ;)

BattlingNelson
04-05-2011, 01:26 PM
The modern rules of boxing was, as mentioned by spartacus sully, of british origin and is recognized as the Queensbury-rules.

If you wanna know more check this fine article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queensbury_rules

Barn
04-05-2011, 04:19 PM
Daniel Mendoza and Jem Mace were a couple of influential fighters with regard to the development of more modern skills in boxing. Both English of course :)
A note to our American cousins re the whole English/British thing. When an Englishman wins he is English, when a scots/Irish/welsh man wins he is British. If however they lose they revert to being scots/Irish/welsh.
Just in case you ever got confused by the nationality changes we use ;)
****ing andy murray

GJC
04-06-2011, 06:56 AM
****ing andy murray
Obviously going to wait on this years Wimbledon to categorise Mr Murray but I get the feeling he may stay Scottish :)