View Full Version : Willie Pepp a crazy boxing lord?


Tha Greatest
09-02-2005, 01:30 AM
I saw this guy fight yesterday, most ****in amazing defense I have seen, this guy is like a ****in god...

He's amazing..

Who do you think is more talented...Robinson or Pepp?

abdiel2k3
09-02-2005, 01:32 AM
who and where did he fight?
is he with golden boy? top rank?
was it televised?
what division is he?































Lol
:D

Yogi
09-02-2005, 01:47 AM
I saw this guy fight yesterday, most ****in amazing defense I have seen, this guy is like a ****in god...

He's amazing..

Who do you think is more talented...Robinson or Pepp?

Yeah man, Pep was an amazing boxing talent and most fans of boxing history rate him as the greatest Featherweight of all-time.

Like you say, it was mainly his defensive mastery which stood out above all other things with him. He could do it all on defense and at the very highest level, as he'd slip, slide, side-step, block, parry, duck...whatever it took to avoid his opponents punches, and he pulled those moves off with excellant quickness, amazing reflexes, and beautiful grace. He was also very quick to counter his opponents misses, as well, and was very excellant at feinting his opponent into making the first move.

One of the greatest fighters of all-time, no doubt, and most often named as the greatest defensive fighter of all-time by those in the know.

M26
09-02-2005, 10:19 AM
Yeah man, Pep was an amazing boxing talent and most fans of boxing history rate him as the greatest Featherweight of all-time.

Like you say, it was mainly his defensive mastery which stood out above all other things with him. He could do it all on defense and at the very highest level, as he'd slip, slide, side-step, block, parry, duck...whatever it took to avoid his opponents punches, and he pulled those moves off with excellant quickness, amazing reflexes, and beautiful grace. He was also very quick to counter his opponents misses, as well, and was very excellant at feinting his opponent into making the first move.

One of the greatest fighters of all-time, no doubt, and most often named as the greatest defensive fighter of all-time by those in the know.

Yup, that pretty much covers it! A great fighter.

Tha Greatest
09-02-2005, 10:59 AM
The guy was like superman...

I still got sugar ray #1 though...for all his accomplishments and well roundedness...

ricecrispi
09-05-2005, 05:30 AM
The guy was like superman...

I still got sugar ray #1 though...for all his accomplishments and well roundedness...

Read he won a round with out throwing a single punch and told everyone what round it would be....

J !
09-06-2005, 09:09 AM
yip one of my all time great fighters, be interesting to know the date of the video footage, pre or post crash.

yip it could well be that he was doing this after a plane crash that left his back broken and one leg shorter than the other.


a legend of legends.

PerfectPunch
09-06-2005, 01:06 PM
Yeah man, Pep was an amazing boxing talent and most fans of boxing history rate him as the greatest Featherweight of all-time.

Like you say, it was mainly his defensive mastery which stood out above all other things with him. He could do it all on defense and at the very highest level, as he'd slip, slide, side-step, block, parry, duck...whatever it took to avoid his opponents punches, and he pulled those moves off with excellant quickness, amazing reflexes, and beautiful grace. He was also very quick to counter his opponents misses, as well, and was very excellant at feinting his opponent into making the first move.

One of the greatest fighters of all-time, no doubt, and most often named as the greatest defensive fighter of all-time by those in the know.

yeh he was an amazing defensive fighter, but i reckon the greatest defensiver fighter was pernell whitaker

pug1986
09-06-2005, 05:13 PM
He was the one that won a round without throwing a single punch if I'm correct.

Yogi
09-08-2005, 03:41 PM
I think that story about Pep winning a round without throwing a single punch is more of a modern myth than actual reality.

It was said to have happened in the third round of Pep's fight against Jackie Graves, but according to a boxing historian whom I've gained a bunch of respect for, the actual fight reports of that Pep/Graves fight indicate that it didn't happen, and in fact the third round was said to have had more action in it than most of the other rounds in the fight..."A clicker couldn't count the blows landed by both" is one comment made by the newspaper reporters regarding that particular round, and no mention of Pep's supposed feat anywhere in the reports.

J !
09-13-2005, 12:58 PM
In the annuls of boxing there are many "urban myths", tall tales, and outright lies told about the fighters of the past. Did heavyweight William Harrison Dempsey really call himself "Jack" in honor of the great middleweight Jack "The Nonpareil" Dempsey? Did Dempsey have plaster-of-Paris on his hands the day he beat Jess Willard within an inch of his life? Did Joe Louis once give a shiny new half-dollar to a goggle-eyed young fan named Rocky Marciano? Did Ali once draw the smallest attendance for a world heavyweight title fight in the history of the sport? Was Harry Greb really blind in one eye the last 5 years of his career? And did Willie Pep, the Will o' the wisp, really win a round without landing a single punch?

Pep was likened to a tap dancer in boxing gloves. He was fast, he was agile, he was graceful. A Pep fight resembled a ballroom dance with one partner a masterful Fred Astaire and the other apparently lacking a single dance lesson. He was called the Will o' the Wisp because, like that illusive phenomenon, he was almost impossible to lay hands upon.By the age of 20 he had won 54 fights in a row without a loss before taking the featherweight title from future HOF fighter Chalky Wright in a bout in which he never once hurt Wright, but played him like a violin. More precisely, a Stradivarius.Willie would continue to win, losing only once in his next 49 fights (to future Hall of Famer Sammy Angot), before he would be matched against a Top Ten fighter with a 25-2 record named Jackie Graves on July 25th, 1945 in Minneapolis. Graves was a southpaw, and perhaps a sportswriter had hinted that it might cause Pep a problem. Or perhaps Willie was just in the mood to show them something they'd never seen before. Whatever his motivation,prior to the start of the bout, Pep would make a prediction to rival any later made by Muhammed Ali; he would win a round without throwing a single punch.

Not only that, but he would tell them up-front just which round to watch for it; round number three. Bert Sugar said of the audacious feat: "Pep tipped off a few friendly sportswriters that he would not throw a punch in anger in the third round.... Pep moved; Pep switched to southpaw, mocking Graves; Pep danced; Pep weaved; Pep spun Graves around and around again; Pep gave head feints, shoulder feints, foot feints, and feint feints. But Pep never landed a punch." The crowd at ringside sat in spellbound awe as Pep put on perhaps the greatest three minute demonstration on the art of boxing ever witnessed. In just 180 seconds he joined the ranks of those who had done some legendary act to fulfill a fearless prediction; the called-shot of Babe Ruth, the "We're gonna win, I guarantee it!" bravado of Joe Namath, and "They all will fall, in the round I call" predictions of Ali.Sportswriter Don Riley, who was ringside and forewarned of Pep's plan for the third round, said, "It was an amazing display of defensive boxing skill so adroit, so cunning, so subtle that the roaring crowd did not notice Pep's tactics were completely without offense. He made Jim Corbett's agility look like a broken down locomotive. He made even Sugar Ray Robinson's fluidity look like cement hardening. Never has boxing seen such perfection!" He had fought the round without throwing a punch, but had he won it? Was his display so mesmerizing that even the keen eyed judges were beguiled? Pep knocked Graves down 9 times, ending the fight in the 8th round via TKO, but it wasn't the victory the ringside press were excited about; it was the score cards of the judges. When the cards were presented, there it was in black and white; Willie Pep had won the third round, the punchless round, on all three cards. The Will o' the Wisp had given boxing another legendary moment.

Oh, as to those other "did it happens?", here's the run down: Jack Dempsey did name himself after The Nonpareil Dempsey, he didn't put Plaster-of-Paris on his hands (an impossibility sworn to under oath by the inventor of the product), Louis did give a half-dollar to Marciano and another kid as they followed him around at a boxing show where he was guest announcer, Ali-Listion II drew only 2434 fans (the least ever), and Greb was blinded in one eye by Kid Norfolk in 1921, yet kept it a secret and fought successfully the final 5 years of his career and his life. And, of course, Willie Pep did win a round without landing a single punch

from esb but you wouldnt imagine bert sugar making it up.

chopper77
09-13-2005, 02:46 PM
Pep was an amazing defensive fighter, but I have to give the tip of the hat to Sugar Ray. Pep did prove that this is indeed the "Sweet Science".

Yogi
09-13-2005, 03:09 PM
J, yeah I've read that particular article before, but I'm still not convinced that it happened. Here's one example of what I've read in regards to that Pep/Graves fight, which are the words of Jake Wegner, who's a boxing historian & researcher for the International Boxing Research Organization;


"A boxing fan is content with just watching the fights; a boxing historian needs much more. He needs to get access to the fighters and get inside accounts. Historians ask questions.

A fan will read that Willie Pep once won the third round of his fight with Jackie Graves without throwing a punch and believe the myth. A historian will read through the reels of newspaper microfilm from that city, interview spectators when possible and compare newspaper accounts.

This is important because history becomes heresy if the facts are not reported and spoken of in an accurate manner.

Would it make a difference if you knew that the newspapers of the time never reported a story about Pep winning a round in such a manner and that the fable did not emerge until decades later? Or would it matter that the actual newspaper accounts state that the third was the most rapid of the night, saying, 'A clicker couldn't count the blows'. Would you still believe the tale? You would if you were a person eager to spread legend and predisposed to accepting stories because they agree with your particular ideas. You wouldn't if you are a historian. You would want to know the truth and once presented with facts would accept them as such."

J !
09-14-2005, 09:07 AM
interesting mate thanks, wasnt flaming you or trying to disporve or prove anything was just relevant/pertinent to the chat. (i know you didnt take it that way but just in case mate)

thanks for the post it does seem its still a murky area for sure.