View Full Version : Treating shin splints?


BG_Knocc_Out
10-30-2010, 03:37 PM
Any insight from any of you who've experienced these? Does it make you more susceptible to them in the future after you get one?

paulsinghnl
10-30-2010, 04:38 PM
i had them because i never used to stretch and i was overweight, i stretch all the time now, my legs are stronger (so better weight distribution) and i've lost a lot of weight.

stretching will help, the cause for my shin splints were tight calf muscles and tight quadriceps (front thigh muscles) that irritated that ligament over my knee.

BG_Knocc_Out
10-30-2010, 05:37 PM
i had them because i never used to stretch and i was overweight, i stretch all the time now, my legs are stronger (so better weight distribution) and i've lost a lot of weight.

stretching will help, the cause for my shin splints were tight calf muscles and tight quadriceps (front thigh muscles) that irritated that ligament over my knee.

What stretches do you do? I stretch a little bit because I know it's real important, but apparently I don't do it nearly enough.
And thanks for all this help you provide.

Tomislav III
10-30-2010, 07:36 PM
Here are some stretches, they help, but they won't fix the problem.


Right now, you're experiencing the splints because you'r an inexperienced runner. It will take a few months for your calves to strengthen and toughen to the point that you don't have that aching in your shins.

For now, RICE is the best option, and I've also seen people tape their calves tight on runs to try and hold the muscle and bone together. That works quite well actually.


But until your lower legs can toughen a bit, I'm afraid the pain will be there.


PS Try running on grass, a track, or a treadmill instead of pavement at first, this will help to slowly toughen your legs up and won't be nearly as painful because there will be much more give to the surface that you are running on.

paulsinghnl
10-30-2010, 09:13 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kv6ycmOWnq0

i'm a fan of the 2nd stretch she explains in this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfCLuuhFMrc

this stretch is for the upper thigh

and of course the glutes and hamstring stretch, by standing shoulderlength apart, hanging down trying to touch the floor without bending your legs.

i also did an inner thigh stretch by just putting my foot on a high place and stepping outwards, so creating a 90 degree angle and more degrees.

i try to do it before and after i run, about once or twice 30 seconds every stretch

you're welcome, boxers gotta help each other out right?

stocks01
10-31-2010, 08:26 AM
Here are some stretches, they help, but they won't fix the problem.


Right now, you're experiencing the splints because you'r an inexperienced runner. It will take a few months for your calves to strengthen and toughen to the point that you don't have that aching in your shins.

For now, RICE is the best option, and I've also seen people tape their calves tight on runs to try and hold the muscle and bone together. That works quite well actually.


But until your lower legs can toughen a bit, I'm afraid the pain will be there.


PS Try running on grass, a track, or a treadmill instead of pavement at first, this will help to slowly toughen your legs up and won't be nearly as painful because there will be much more give to the surface that you are running on.

^^^^^^^^ Best advice there!

When i joined the armed i had them really bad but there is no real fix to get them better apart from rest and running in the correct conditions. Running on grass and tracts etc is the best thing to do

BG_Knocc_Out
10-31-2010, 02:35 PM
Would the problem escalate if I keep running on pavement? Or do you only recommend that to avoid the pain? Because for me, I only feel the pain for the first five minutes when I run, and then I completely forget about it and stop feeling it afterward because I become unfocused on it. It's when I'm in the gym when it bothers me most because the pain doesn't disappear because the stopping and starting of rounds and such and it affects my performance. I ask because there isn't a track around here, or much consistent grass to run on.

josh-hill
10-31-2010, 06:13 PM
try running on the balls of your feet. basically as if you are on your toes. never let your heels touch the ground. its hard work and tyering to begin with, as your calfs have to act as spring (they absorb the shock, not your shins) but keep at it and you will end up with huge calfs too

led
11-01-2010, 02:50 AM
try running on the balls of your feet. basically as if you are on your toes. never let your heels touch the ground. its hard work and tyering to begin with, as your calfs have to act as spring (they absorb the shock, not your shins) but keep at it and you will end up with huge calfs too

this^^^^^^

BennyST
11-01-2010, 06:07 AM
I used to do ridiculous amounts of skipping. It was one of my favourite exercises and sometimes I'd overdo it and get really bad shin splints. After not being able to train for a long time because of them, and it happening a few too many times, I went and searched for treatments.

The only one that worked; it worked straight away and never came back again, was acupuncture. A form of it called plum blossom needling or something. Seven star plum blossom I think.

It's where they take this acupuncture needle but instead of the single needle it has seven little needle tips, and they run it up and down your shin until there are millions of little spots. Kind of like being tattooed.

Anyway, I didn't think it was going to work, but I rested for a day or two afterward, tried some very light training, didn't feel any pain at all. The next day I started out light again, nothing so got into a bit more, then tried skipping again, and absolutely nothing. No pain.

It never came back. I recommend this to everyone. Get acupuncture and ask for this Seven Star Needling technique. Best thing for splints.

Oh, as for running etc, always try to find an oval/park to run around. Pavement sucks.

alb829
11-01-2010, 08:20 AM
I had them for a while and was able to get rid of them by stretching as everyone has mentioned. Also I had to start strengthening my calves by doing calf raises and calf circles lying on my back. And one other thing I added that I saw while running in a 5k was that people wear calf compression sleeves. I bought a pair and started using them and instantly I noticed an improvement and reduction in pain and swelling. I don't run without them even though I don't really have any pain anymore. I feel like they help warm up my calf and increase circulation in my lower leg.

Here are the ones I use..(on both legs)
http://www.zensah.com/shin-sleeve.html

Oh, and also....it's very important that you find out what kind of gait you have and get the proper shoe if you're going to be running. Alot of the problem starts there. So find out if you are an underpronator or an overpronator or flatfooted and get the appropriate shoe for that. Makes a world of difference along with learning how your foot should properly impact the ground when running. Hope this helps.

alza1988
11-01-2010, 08:56 AM
Any insight from any of you who've experienced these? Does it make you more susceptible to them in the future after you get one?

Sorbothane double strike insloes are good .They work man for real and rice method
http://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8#sclient=psy&hl=en&site=webhp&source=hp&q=sorbothane+double+strike+insoles&rlz=1R2ADFA_enGB403&aq=1&aqi=g5&aql=&oq=sorbothane+double+st&gs_rfai=&pbx=1&psj=1&fp=c7ae6d76d725aa67
http://www.bluebandage.com/RICES.html

Sven72
11-05-2010, 05:22 AM
I had them really bad for about 9 months, tried everything, accupuncture, physio, stretching, icing. Nothing worked. Didn't skip or run for 6 weeks to rest them on doc's advice but came straight back. In the end I just did what I could and stopped if they started to play up

Over the last month they've just dissapeared, I couldn't tell you why, others I know who've had them have said the same thing.

Dont keep training on them if they are really sore though, it can lead to hairline fractures in the shins. Just manage them as best you can and listen to your body