View Full Version : What is a wedge block to the head?


hugh grant
10-13-2010, 05:42 PM
I read in a book that to block hooks to the head a wedge block is good, but the photograph and description wasnt good. What exactly is the wedge block and how do you execute it?
Whats troubling me is hearing new terms for blocks. Come on who has ever heard of wedge for heavens sake.? Wedges are ladies shoes arent they?

Spartacus Sully
10-14-2010, 05:00 AM
I read in a book that to block hooks to the head a wedge block is good, but the photograph and description wasnt good. What exactly is the wedge block and how do you execute it?
Whats troubling me is hearing new terms for blocks. Come on who has ever heard of wedge for heavens sake.? Wedges are ladies shoes arent they?

its not boxing terminology its karate.

its a glance off used as a block just rotate your palm out a little and block with the outside edge of your fore arm, but unlike the glance off just hold the arm in a block instead of knifing off the punch.

http://www.freecirclefighting.com/jdbook.pdf

BLOCKING HOOKS AND SWINGS: Left hooks and swings to the head are blocked with either the right forearm or the rigid, opened right
hand. Blocking contact is made with the outside edge of the arm or hand. The longer and wider the blow, the more easy the block. If the punch
is a left swing or left hook used as a lead, you block with the right forearm or hand, and counter simultaneously with a left jab to the chin. If the punch is a tight left hook at close quarters, you block with right hand or arm, and counter simultaneously with a left shovel to the chin.
Right hooks and swings to the head are blocked with the left forearm, hand or shoulder. At long range, you counter with a straight right to the
jaw; at close range, with a right shovel or uppercut.
Hooks to the body are blocked with elbows-keeping the hands in punching position. You can counter with shovels or uppercuts to the chin.
Uppercuts to head or body are blocked by dropping your forearm or hand onto the opponent's upshooting fist or forearm. You may be able to
counter with either a regular outside hook, or an overhanded hook thrown like the "sneaker".

hugh grant
10-14-2010, 05:06 AM
So its more of a block where you take your forearm away from your face and meet the punch, rather than raising your hands against the side of your chin?

Spartacus Sully
10-14-2010, 05:14 AM
So its more of a block where you take your forearm away from your face and meet the punch, rather than raising your hands against the side of your chin?

http://www.freecirclefighting.com/jdbook.pdf

figure 58 page 67

also page 72 figure 65 and 66

let me know if you need me to explain it better.

hugh grant
10-14-2010, 01:55 PM
In figure 58 you just basically hold your arm out with palm facing opponent and let him hit your elbow it looks like.

Are these common blocks in pro boxing?

Spartacus Sully
10-14-2010, 02:06 PM
In figure 58 you just basically hold your arm out with palm facing opponent and let him hit your elbow it looks like.

Are these common blocks in pro boxing?

elbow? its the side of your forearm on the opponents forearm. have you looked at the other images? there all pretty much the same thing, perhaps your looking at the wrong image if this one stands out to you.

hugh grant
10-14-2010, 02:15 PM
Sorry, i meant forearm and not elbow a slip of the tongue. Thanks anyway.
So its not the traditional or probably more common way of just placing your hand on your face to protect against hooks, and probably more safe.

Spartacus Sully
10-14-2010, 02:31 PM
Sorry, i meant forearm and not elbow a slip of the tongue. Thanks anyway.
So its not the traditional or probably more common way of just placing your hand on your face to protect against hooks, and probably more safe.

well your book recommends it so......id at least give it a few trys in sparring and see if you like it.

i prefer it. i keep my right hand in tight to my face glove allways almost touching my chin all i do is flick out the palm and my forearm catches the punch usually right at the wrist. pretty much the same motion i use to catch jabs with my right, just flick out the palm.

hugh grant
10-14-2010, 05:46 PM
Its almost similar to an outside parry isnt it or how its performed?

Spartacus Sully
10-15-2010, 01:04 AM
Its almost similar to an outside parry isnt it or how its performed?

well a parry is when you your opponet throws a jab and you use your right to bat it to the left or your left to bat their right to the right.

this is a glance off or a wedge block. the block just stops the punch from coming and and dosnt really do anything with the arm and the block is what you should be using for hooks.

while the glance off is for jabs and straights which is the same thing but your
pushing out to push your opponet off balance.

is this what your refering to as an outside parry?

or are you talking about coming in and using a whisking motion with your wrist to throw the punch out words?

hugh grant
10-15-2010, 08:34 PM
Well outside parry im describing is when they throw a left jab, and you with your right hand just parry it or deflect their punch with the back of your right hand.
If they throw a straight right, you with the back of your left hand just deflect their punch, so their punch goes past your left ear almost.

Hard to explain in words sometimes. But the wedge block seems more solid if that makes sense?

Spartacus Sully
10-16-2010, 01:36 AM
Well outside parry im describing is when they throw a left jab, and you with your right hand just parry it or deflect their punch with the back of your right hand.
If they throw a straight right, you with the back of your left hand just deflect their punch, so their punch goes past your left ear almost.

Hard to explain in words sometimes. But the wedge block seems more solid if that makes sense?

Yeah sounds about the same but id say the wedge a much better choice.

like make a outside parry stance and have some one push your hand to your shoulder then take a wedge block stance and have them Try to do the same thing and youll see the diffrence in sturdyness.