View Full Version : weight training for strength NOT bulk


J.Dempsey
09-30-2010, 06:09 PM
I've started added weightlifting to my training for strength, but have noticed that ive started to bulk up and tbh I dont like the feeling, I feeling a little stiffer and slower.

Any of you guys know how to build strength without the bulk, I've read a little but have no experience or know anyone that stays lean and weight trains, any ideas?

Cheers

josh-hill
09-30-2010, 06:22 PM
well you can start by dropping the reps. do 5 reps at hight weight rather than say 10-15 at a lower weight. you can also eat less calories or do more cardio as you wont gain size on a diet. but tbh i never understood when people say this. before i started boxing i did a lot of weightlifting at the local gym and found it verry hard to put on muscle. wish i had your problem :(

BrooklynBomber
09-30-2010, 06:55 PM
Thats not gonna work all too well, you NEED size if you are to gain any substantial amount of strength. What you will also need are supportive exercises in addition to the big three of the strength.

Heru
09-30-2010, 07:04 PM
Don't listen to the #2 poster.

Higher weights and less reps is what you do to build bulk muscle mass.

What you want to do is increase reps and lower the weight amount. This is done to define and develop lean muscle. And I'm talking about low weights around 5,10,15 pounds, with high reps 12-15 done rapidly.

Stretching is a key component to not becoming stiff, so I'd advise a proper stretching session before any workout, but especially any workout with weights.

Calisthenics is probably the route you want to go through for what you're trying to accomplish. You'll get strong and most of it will be lean muscle.

SBleeder
09-30-2010, 07:22 PM
Thats not gonna work all too well, you NEED size if you are to gain any substantial amount of strength.

Bullcrap. There are 105 pound Chinese guys who can lift twice as much weight as big old bodybuilder types.

led
09-30-2010, 10:01 PM
I've started added weightlifting to my training for strength, but have noticed that ive started to bulk up and tbh I dont like the feeling, I feeling a little stiffer and slower.

Any of you guys know how to build strength without the bulk, I've read a little but have no experience or know anyone that stays lean and weight trains, any ideas?

Cheers

ask the plyometric experts. i guess explosiveness is equal to being strong in boxing.

Crazylegs77
09-30-2010, 10:11 PM
Don't listen to the #2 poster.

Higher weights and less reps is what you do to build bulk muscle mass.

What you want to do is increase reps and lower the weight amount. This is done to define and develop lean muscle. And I'm talking about low weights around 5,10,15 pounds, with high reps 12-15 done rapidly.

Stretching is a key component to not becoming stiff, so I'd advise a proper stretching session before any workout, but especially any workout with weights.

Calisthenics is probably the route you want to go through for what you're trying to accomplish. You'll get strong and most of it will be lean muscle.

all this this right here is the right way to go ^^

Im not interested in bulking up either one thing I like to do is work with 8-10lb medicine balls high rep broad range of motion moves as well..really good total body strength and toning...

Be careful on here with people not knowing what the hell they talking about like poster #2 :lol1:

BrooklynBomber
09-30-2010, 10:52 PM
Don't listen to the #2 poster.

Higher weights and less reps is what you do to build bulk muscle mass.
What you want to do is increase reps and lower the weight amount. This is done to define and develop lean muscle. And I'm talking about low weights around 5,10,15 pounds, with high reps 12-15 done rapidly.

Stretching is a key component to not becoming stiff, so I'd advise a proper stretching session before any workout, but especially any workout with weights.

Calisthenics is probably the route you want to go through for what you're trying to accomplish. You'll get strong and most of it will be lean muscle.

That is crap. Flex your fingers, boys, we are starting another weighttraining holywar!

triggerhapppy
09-30-2010, 10:55 PM
Try doing some yoga.

BrooklynBomber
09-30-2010, 10:55 PM
If you are not looking to bulk up, you just eat the caloric amount that is equal to what your body uses. The rep scheme does not matter much only that higher rep scheme are not nearly as good at stimulating central nervous system(and especially the testosterone production, which is the main growth factor in the body). Lower rep/higher weight schemes are almost always a better way to increase strength and mass, simply because they make our body adopt more. Thats about it to the whole of weight training.

Spartacus Sully
10-01-2010, 01:55 AM
If you are not looking to bulk up, you just eat the caloric amount that is equal to what your body uses. The rep scheme does not matter much only that higher rep scheme are not nearly as good at stimulating central nervous system(and especially the testosterone production, which is the main growth factor in the body). Lower rep/higher weight schemes are almost always a better way to increase strength and mass, simply because they make our body adopt more. Thats about it to the whole of weight training.

really i think thats a large mis-conception.

fast twitch fibers react much more quickly to eletrical impulses then slow twitch, if your increasing the over all conductivity of the muscle by increasing the number of fast twitch fibers of course its going to appear as though your stimulating the nervous system better. the best way to stimulate the nervous system is by doing the same thing over and over an over and over and over and over and over again. so while you are doing reps and you are doing the same thing over and over and over again your not doing it nearly as much as you would be with high reps low weight as well since slow twitch is not nearly as conductive as fast twitch by exercising in a manner that promotes slow twitch your cutting off the conductivity of the muscle forcing your nervous system to get stronger.

Clegg
10-01-2010, 03:19 AM
Uh, the #2 poster is correct. Lower reps, higher weights.

Doing more reps and less weight isn't the right way to go about it. "Hey, I wanna get strong" "Oh, well the best way to do that is to lift less weight":dunce:

How is your diet?

Spartacus Sully
10-01-2010, 03:38 AM
Uh, the #2 poster is correct. Lower reps, higher weights.

Doing more reps and less weight isn't the right way to go about it. "Hey, I wanna get strong" "Oh, well the best way to do that is to lift less weight":dunce:

How is your diet?

but it is just as effective at strengthening the muscle.

less weight more reps improves speed strength, stamina strength and explosive strength.

low reps heavy weight improves max strength and explosive strength.

both ways are effective at increasing strenth but depending on the goal one way can be many times more effective then the other.

Clegg
10-01-2010, 03:40 AM
low reps heavy weight improves max strength and explosive strength.


Glad you agree:kiss:

J.Dempsey
10-01-2010, 09:03 AM
Wow didn't think I'd get such an informative response, u guys know your sh1t!
Only problem is, which is it? Higher rep less weight or heavier weight less rep?
It does make sense to lift heavier to increase strength, but I thought that wud tear your muscle up more and in turn make it grow??
My diet is pretty decent, cereal, tuna/chicken sandwich or salad, and very little carbs after 6, I also take whey protein shake after training... Mayb like you guys say, just the right calories to train and I won't be able to bulk up?
Only thing is, how do you work out how many calories you need?!
Thanks

Spartacus Sully
10-01-2010, 09:47 AM
Wow didn't think I'd get such an informative response, u guys know your sh1t!
Only problem is, which is it? Higher rep less weight or heavier weight less rep?
It does make sense to lift heavier to increase strength, but I thought that wud tear your muscle up more and in turn make it grow??
My diet is pretty decent, cereal, tuna/chicken sandwich or salad, and very little carbs after 6, I also take whey protein shake after training... Mayb like you guys say, just the right calories to train and I won't be able to bulk up?
Only thing is, how do you work out how many calories you need?!
Thanks

why not do both?

a set of low reps heavy weight, 2 sets of low weights high reps, and a set of high weight low reps.

El Protagonista
10-01-2010, 09:52 AM
Wow didn't think I'd get such an informative response, u guys know your sh1t!
Only problem is, which is it? Higher rep less weight or heavier weight less rep?
It does make sense to lift heavier to increase strength, but I thought that wud tear your muscle up more and in turn make it grow??
My diet is pretty decent, cereal, tuna/chicken sandwich or salad, and very little carbs after 6, I also take whey protein shake after training... Mayb like you guys say, just the right calories to train and I won't be able to bulk up?
Only thing is, how do you work out how many calories you need?!
Thanks

Man, the truth is you're never going to find the correct answer. Everyone's body is different. Me for example, I've gotten better results (as far as gaining size) by doing 8-12 reps. I have friends who get better results doing 4-6 and other people get the best results with 15-20. Tbh, don't listen to anyone.

Instead pay attention to what your own body is telling you. Everyone is different and this is why muscle magazines and internet articles are always contradicting eachother.

My advise is to try different methods for about 4-6 weeks at a time and see what works best for you. :fing02:

BrooklynBomber
10-01-2010, 10:11 AM
really i think thats a large mis-conception.

fast twitch fibers react much more quickly to eletrical impulses then slow twitch, if your increasing the over all conductivity of the muscle by increasing the number of fast twitch fibers of course its going to appear as though your stimulating the nervous system better. the best way to stimulate the nervous system is by doing the same thing over and over an over and over and over and over and over again. so while you are doing reps and you are doing the same thing over and over and over again your not doing it nearly as much as you would be with high reps low weight as well since slow twitch is not nearly as conductive as fast twitch by exercising in a manner that promotes slow twitch your cutting off the conductivity of the muscle forcing your nervous system to get stronger.

That would be only good if you were looking to get better at one specific exercise with one fixed weight, for example body weight pull ups. If your dream is to be able to do 50 pull ups then doing pull ups 5 times a week, each time slightly increasing the number of repetitions would be what you are describing.

However if your dream is to be able to slam someone in the wall with a small push things get a lot trickier. There is only limited amount of people that you can push into walls before they gang up on you and kick your ass, however if you are looking to increase your overall physical strength to what it's not been a week ago, or yesterday then you need to optimise your cns through progressive overloading of the actual weight, rather then number of times you can push that weight, because every time you pick up a heavier weight, you exert more force= all things being equal, your every next single push would be likelier to slam someone in the wall. If you, however, work only on one weight, all your body will do would be to adopt to use less energy to exert the same amount of force. So yes, your every next push will still move the person only a couple of inches back, but you will get less tired of it.

Rockin'
10-01-2010, 10:36 AM
When I was amatuer I took a weight training class for 3 semesters in highschool. I did alot of high rep lower weights but did them fast, pumping them out.

I also did higher weights with less reps. If I couldnt lift it 10 times then I lowered the weight until thats what I was doing, 10 reps.

In that time I moved up from 139 to 147. I was strong but not bulky, just cut. Lots of stretching and I was good.

Boxing is so much about endurance. I still say that less weight and higher reps is the way............Rockin':boxing:

Earl Hickey
10-01-2010, 09:42 PM
When I was amatuer I took a weight training class for 3 semesters in highschool. I did alot of high rep lower weights but did them fast, pumping them out.

I also did higher weights with less reps. If I couldnt lift it 10 times then I lowered the weight until thats what I was doing, 10 reps.

In that time I moved up from 139 to 147. I was strong but not bulky, just cut. Lots of stretching and I was good.

Boxing is so much about endurance. I still say that less weight and higher reps is the way............Rockin':boxing:

exactly, i dont see how being able to bench 3X your bodyweight 5 times is transferrable to the boxing ring.

BrooklynBomber
10-01-2010, 10:32 PM
exactly, i dont see how being able to bench 3X your bodyweight 5 times is transferrable to the boxing ring.

That would mean absolutely inhuman explosive strength. That would transfer a lot into a boxing ring.

Trick
10-02-2010, 04:44 AM
The only thing I'll say is that I've gotten good results by switching between "programs" on a roughly 6-8week cycle. Been walking at 155lbs for a long time now. If you don't want to gain mass you're not going to gain strength as quickly and easily as someone who does. That's just the reality of it. But I can tell you that for a while now mine has been slowly increasing despite maintaining a constant bodyweight.

About the stiffness- strech... and don't forget your actually boxing training. Of course you'll feel stiff if all you did last month was hang around the weightroom. To help with that I loosen up on the speedbag at the end of every weight workout and strech "hard" every night.

J.Dempsey
10-02-2010, 04:50 AM
Thanks for all the help guys, I'll b trying out heavy weights low reps for 4 weeks (started last night) and will then try low weights high reps and see what difference I feel, I'll also b watching my calories and start stretching more..watch this space in a month or so...
Gdluck training wit ur goals ;)

Jack3d
10-02-2010, 06:33 PM
Don't listen to the #2 poster.
Higher weights and less reps is what you do to build bulk muscle mass.

Wrong

What you want to do is increase reps and lower the weight amount. This is done to define and develop lean muscle. And I'm talking about low weights around 5,10,15 pounds, with high reps 12-15 done rapidly.

Wrong Again.

You people look too deep into rep ranges. Rep Ranges are SOOOOOO overrated it's not even funny.

But if you want to talk about rep ranges and what's typical....

1-5 Reps- Strength
6-12 Reps- Hypertrophy
12-15+ - Endurance

But this isn't universal because nobody responds to same way.

Bottom line if you want to get stronger, you need to move around some serious weight. Period.

Do compound lifts and Olympic lifts.

If you are a boxer, I'd go with Olympic Lifts

Lifting alone is not going to make you "bulky" or "toned" how big or how lean you are depends on your diet and cardiovascular exercise in conjunction with your training program. The more you eat, the bigger you will get, the less and cleaner you eat the more "ripped" you will be.

Doing a ridiculous amount of reps with 10lbs is not going to make your muscles lean.

To avoid becoming stiff, you also need to stretch.




Calisthenics is probably the route you want to go through for what you're trying to accomplish. You'll get strong and most of it will be lean muscle.

Please don't give out anymore advice.

Bullcrap. There are 105 pound Chinese guys who can lift twice as much weight as big old bodybuilder types.

Bodybuilders don't train for strength, so that's really a moot point.

J.Dempsey
10-02-2010, 06:41 PM
Wrong



Wrong Again.

You people look too deep into rep ranges. Rep Ranges are SOOOOOO overrated it's not even funny.

But if you want to talk about rep ranges and what's typical....

1-5 Reps- Strength
6-12 Reps- Hypertrophy
12-15+ - Endurance

But this isn't universal because nobody responds to same way.

Bottom line if you want to get stronger, you need to move around some serious weight. Period.

Do compound lifts and Olympic lifts.

Lifting alone is not going to make you "bulky" or "toned" how big or how lean you are depends on your diet and cardiovascular exercise in conjunction with your training program. The more you eat, the bigger you will get, the less and cleaner you eat the more "ripped" you will be.

Doing a ridiculous amount of reps with 10lbs is not going to make your muscles lean.

To avoid becoming stiff, you also need to stretch.






Please don't give out anymore advice.



Bodybuilders don't train for strength, so that's really a moot point.

nice points there thanks alot bro!

Clegg
10-02-2010, 11:34 PM
Are you trying to increase your strength for boxing or just in general?

J.Dempsey
10-03-2010, 07:14 AM
Are you trying to increase your strength for boxing or just in general?

both really, ofcourse I want to increase punching power and generally the core for balance etc, but i do a little MMA too so want all round strength for grappling/wrestling etc and just for good health.
These lot have been great and I will be switching up my diet and routine to test things, anything else you know? thanks

them_apples
10-03-2010, 12:52 PM
I've started added weightlifting to my training for strength, but have noticed that ive started to bulk up and tbh I dont like the feeling, I feeling a little stiffer and slower.

Any of you guys know how to build strength without the bulk, I've read a little but have no experience or know anyone that stays lean and weight trains, any ideas?

Cheers

that will go away just take a week off the weights before a fight. It's Mostly the blood and muscle tear giving you that feeling. To much muscle though, will sap your stamina and hinder your speed depending on your frame size. Muscle eats oxygen.

BrooklynBomber
10-03-2010, 02:07 PM
I am still not sure how you will become stiff from squats and deadlifts. Squat was the single most important tool in achieving healthy and flexible hamstrings(Mind you I never squatted more then 255 pounds X 7 ). What is a general rule of a thumb in training is that your weakest muscle is also usually your least flexible muscle as well.
est
Ofcourse, if you are gonna spend all your night on curles, you are going to be quite stiff, but that would just be dumb for boxing.

SBleeder
10-03-2010, 03:00 PM
Bodybuilders don't train for strength, so that's really a moot point.

Brookland Bomber stated that a person NEEDS size to gain strength, which is simply not true.

Jack3d
10-03-2010, 03:25 PM
Brookland Bomber stated that a person NEEDS size to gain strength, which is simply not true.

My bad then. But gaining weight and or putting on size can help with strength. Especially pressing strength. At least from my experience

BrooklynBomber
10-03-2010, 06:32 PM
I am yet to see a 105, yet even 150 pound person that can press or clean 400-500 pounds. Olympic sports not withstanding, no one actually can..


Bodybuilders are strong as hell, however they are not relevant to the topic since it's the powerlifters that usually beat all the records of strength. And these guys are big. I also stated that you do need mass to lift mass, but only after a certain point. Most certainly you need to be big to be really strong, you can stay flirting with 140 pounds of bodyweight your whole life, but that won't get you very far strength wise. Up to a certain point, but not after it.
What I do stand by is that in order to be strong you gotta move big.

josh-hill
10-03-2010, 07:11 PM
That would mean absolutely inhuman explosive strength. That would transfer a lot into a boxing ring.

wrong. it would mean huge maximal strength. if you then did some training to increase explosive strength then it would mean you would your punches would be much stronger. but you need to work on explosive strength separately. i presume with polymetrics.

also you are right about the rep ranges. [quote]
1-5 Reps- Strength
6-12 Reps- Hypertrophy
12-15+ - Endurance [quote]

if anyone is interested its because your body tries to use as little muscle as possible, starting with slow twitch fibers. incidental fast twitch fibers are the ones that grow in size most. at a low weight , i.e. you can do 15 reps your body only needs to use the slow twitch muscles so only they get trained. at heavy weights your body needs to recruit fast twitch fibers too to be able to lift it. this meens more fibers get used and more get stronger. im not sure why medium reps encourages growth though. if anyone could point me towards some info i would be grateful as i am trying to do a lot of research into this.

SBleeder
10-03-2010, 07:22 PM
I am yet to see a 105, yet even 150 pound person that can press or clean 400-500 pounds. Olympic sports not withstanding, no one actually can..


Bodybuilders are strong as hell, however they are not relevant to the topic since it's the powerlifters that usually beat all the records of strength. And these guys are big. I also stated that you do need mass to lift mass, but only after a certain point. Most certainly you need to be big to be really strong, you can stay flirting with 140 pounds of bodyweight your whole life, but that won't get you very far strength wise. Up to a certain point, but not after it.
What I do stand by is that in order to be strong you gotta move big.

Sorry, but you're wrong. The fact that 105 pound weightlifters and powerlifters can move more weight than an average 250 pound man is evidence enough that muscle mass is not required for strength.

BrooklynBomber
10-03-2010, 07:29 PM
wrong. it would mean huge maximal strength. if you then did some training to increase explosive strength then it would mean you would your punches would be much stronger. but you need to work on explosive strength separately. i presume with polymetrics.

also you are right about the rep ranges. [quote]
1-5 Reps- Strength
6-12 Reps- Hypertrophy
12-15+ - Endurance [quote]

if anyone is interested its because your body tries to use as little muscle as possible, starting with slow twitch fibers. incidental slow twitch fibers are the ones that grow in size most. at a low weight , i.e. you can do 15 reps your body only needs to use the slow twitch muscles so only they get trained. at heavy weights your body needs to recruit fast twitch fibers too to be able to lift it. this meens more fibers get used and more get stronger. im not sure why medium reps encourages growth though. if anyone could point me towards some info i would be grateful as i am trying to do a lot of research into this.

No, you got it all wrong. In order for your body to execute movement at most explosive rate it will have to use the most motor units. That can be achieved by training your maximum mascular strength. Thats why olympic weight lifters are some of the most explosive athletes in the world, and so are the powerlifters. They work on their maximum strength, which in turn trains body to activate the highest number of motor units in high-treshold fast twitch muscles.

And you completely got it wrong when referring to slow twitch fibers growing the most in size, they simply cant do such thing, It is the fast twitch activators that grow the most. You can simple compare marathon runners to sprint runners to see which one of them grew more.

BrooklynBomber
10-03-2010, 07:33 PM
Sorry, but you're wrong. The fact that 105 pound weightlifters and powerlifters can move more weight than an average 250 pound man is evidence enough that muscle mass is not required for strength.

Well, good luck getting there. But I doubt you actually are set on getting anywhere.

PS> there is no 105 pound devision in any form of weight lifting, maybe some sort of baby exercises are what you keep in mind.

josh-hill
10-03-2010, 07:42 PM
That would mean absolutely inhuman explosive strength. That would transfer a lot into a boxing ring.

[QUOTE=josh-hill;9350013]wrong. it would mean huge maximal strength. if you then did some training to increase explosive strength then it would mean you would your punches would be much stronger. but you need to work on explosive strength separately. i presume with polymetrics.

also you are right about the rep ranges. [quote]
1-5 Reps- Strength
6-12 Reps- Hypertrophy
12-15+ - Endurance

No, you got it all wrong. In order for your body to execute movement at most explosive rate it will have to use the most motor units. That can be achieved by training your maximum mascular strength. Thats why olympic weight lifters are some of the most explosive athletes in the world, and so are the powerlifters. They work on their maximum strength, which in turn trains body to activate the highest number of motor units in high-treshold fast twitch muscles.

And you completely got it wrong when referring to slow twitch fibers growing the most in size, they simply cant do such thing, It is the fast twitch activators that grow the most. You can simple compare marathon runners to sprint runners to see which one of them grew more.

i said that fast twitch muscles grow the most didnt i? i meant to anyway. that was the point of my argument. that you need to use high weights to target these fast twitch fibers as they are the ones that grow. im looking into this as much as i can so can you link me to any evidence. i understand that by going heavy you can encourage your body to use more fibers by getting it used to using fast twitch fibers. while this makes them work together i dont think it makes them faster than they already where, just creates that efffect as they are working together. so this will work up to a certain extent but after you need to specificaly target them in a way to train them to work faster. im going by ross at ross training for most of this stuff.

edit: you where right. i did say slow. but it is in fact fast twitch muscles that grow more. its getting late lol. i should get some sleep

paulsinghnl
10-03-2010, 07:51 PM
i am not a fan of weights, except the ones with shadowboxing like the guy said before. i think i'll do weights when i can do like handstand or 1-handed pushups, one handed pullups, hurdle jumps that are half my height, see where i'm going with this?

i dont think weight training is at all necessary if you can still push your body to its' limits with regular plyo's etc. it's more functional anyway, when you do

our trainer had us doing pushups on basketballs (not good for the balls by the way) that was tough as hell, the balls are way too light to hold in control.

SBleeder
10-03-2010, 07:52 PM
Well, good luck getting there. But I doubt you actually are set on getting anywhere.

PS> there is no 105 pound devision in any form of weight lifting, maybe some sort of baby exercises are what you keep in mind.

OK, fine. The lowest weight class for Weightlifting is 123 pounds. That's still pretty light compared to your average muscle-head, and yet those tiny men can outlift you or me easily.

As far as what I'm doing, it is my goal to shed quite a bit of muscle.

josh-hill
10-03-2010, 07:57 PM
i am not a fan of weights, except the ones with shadowboxing like the guy said before. i think i'll do weights when i can do like handstand or 1-handed pushups, one handed pullups, hurdle jumps that are half my height, see where i'm going with this?

i dont think weight training is at all necessary if you can still push your body to its' limits with regular plyo's etc. it's more functional anyway, when you do

our trainer had us doing pushups on basketballs (not good for the balls by the way) that was tough as hell, the balls are way too light to hold in control.

i understand what you are ssaying and you are probably right. there is no NEED to weight lift. doing BW exercises is enough for most people. but when you think about it there is verry little difference between the two. apart from the equipment. i think Ross Enamait said they are both tools to the same goal along with other things such as resistance bands and whatever.

personaly i want to lift weights because i am at a low amout of muscle and am verry weak. and it seems like the fastest way to get up in weight / strength. when i get to a decent strength i will start focusing on endurance and explosiveness

paulsinghnl
10-03-2010, 08:16 PM
what i think is hard, is keeping your flexibility and agility when doing weights, you get stiff with the focused workouts. or so thats my experience. no more snap with your punches, slower reflexes and less endurance with bigger muscles, wanting more blood. i think if i will ever do weights, it'll focus on supersets and variation.

but i understand what you want to do. let me know how it works out bro.

mathed
10-03-2010, 11:54 PM
Lots of cardio, a good diet, and body weight exercises. Pushups, situps, dumbell exercises with 12-15 reps or more, you'll get stronger but it is more for endurance than size. Pullups at different grip distances apart, like 4 different types of pushups (triangle, military, wide, shoulder width)....just do 40 yard sprints as fast as you can....sets of 10 to 20 for your legs...they will kill you for a couple days afterwards so start with 10 and see how that feels.

Clegg
10-04-2010, 01:21 AM
both really, ofcourse I want to increase punching power and generally the core for balance etc, but i do a little MMA too so want all round strength for grappling/wrestling etc and just for good health.
These lot have been great and I will be switching up my diet and routine to test things, anything else you know? thanks

I have never lifted weight at the same time (period of my life) as doing boxing or BJJ, so I'm not sure what a good routine would be. I'd be worried about my muscle being sore from one thing when trying to do the other really. But I will say that with both boxing and BJJ I lost weight and so if it's the same for you then perhaps if you try something like 3(or more) boxing/MMA sessions per week and only 1 weight lifting session? But that would mean doing all the major muscle groups on the same day, which would probably take it out of you quite a bit, especially if lifting heavy. If I pushed myself as hard as possible doing squats, then I don't think I'd be able to then push myself very hard doing bench and deadlift straight after.

I remember there was a poster on here before, I think his username was ...David..., and he was a bodybuilder who shed a lot of weight to become a boxer, and said that he managed to maintain a lot of his strength in doing so.

Not sure what happened to that guy though as how much muscle+strength he ended up losing in the end, I'll try and look for one of his threads in a minute...

Spartacus Sully
10-04-2010, 01:45 AM
NOOOOOOO your all wrong.

Just do your month with heavy weights and your month with light weights and see what you like best.

and when you start doing light weights high reps do like 2-4 lbs weights with 30+ reps you dont really have to do much of any exercises. just a few light ones for the shoulders triceps forearms with some light weighted shadow boxing and some weighted core twists.

Darkstranger
10-08-2010, 07:44 AM
Bulking is dependent on diet. Eat at surplus calories and you'll put on muscle.

Strength training requires lower reps with heavy weights.

Check out 5x5 or 3x5 training. You'll be surprised at how strong you can get. You could even try 3x3.

Spartacus Sully
10-08-2010, 07:48 AM
Bulking is dependent on diet. Eat at surplus calories and you'll put on muscle.

Strength training requires lower reps with heavy weights.

Check out 5x5 or 3x5 training. You'll be surprised at how strong you can get. You could even try 3x3.

weigh lifting is pushing boxing is impacting.

stop weight lifiting and spend that time boxing and youd be amazed at how much better you are.

Darkstranger
10-08-2010, 07:50 AM
weigh lifting is pushing boxing is impacting.

stop weight lifiting and spend that time boxing and youd be amazed at how much better you are.


He's asking about strength, not boxing skills. If you're smart you can fit strength training in your boxing schedule.

Spartacus Sully
10-08-2010, 07:54 AM
He's asking about strength, not boxing skills. If you're smart you can fit strength training in your boxing schedule.

not really. your stressing muscles. have you ever gone to the gym for n hour then went to the boxing gym for 3 hours? while i know plenty of people that can go for an hour jog then go to the boxing gym for 3 hours.

I bet most people couldnt even go to a boxing gym for an hour after weight lifitng for an hour and if they do you can bet they wont be back the next day.

Darkstranger
10-08-2010, 08:02 AM
weigh lifting is pushing boxing is impacting.

stop weight lifiting and spend that time boxing and youd be amazed at how much better you are.

not really. your stressing muscles. have you ever gone to the gym for n hour then went to the boxing gym for 3 hours? while i know plenty of people that can go for an hour jog then go to the boxing gym for 3 hours.

I bet most people couldnt even go to a boxing gym for an hour after weight lifitng for an hour and if they do you can bet they wont be back the next day.

When you start strength training you start off light, and build up over a number of weeks and months. Your body will adapt and you'll get through your sessions if your nutrition's adequate.

Also when you train for strength, you won't be lifting to failure. Which makes a big difference. Training to failure is a bodybuilding thing and would most certainly make a big a impact on your boxing sessions.

Spartacus Sully
10-08-2010, 08:13 AM
When you start strength training you start off light, and build up over a number of weeks and months. Your body will adapt and you'll get through your sessions if your nutrition's adequate.

Also when you train for strength, you won't be lifting to failure. Which makes a big difference. Training to failure is a bodybuilding thing and would most certainly make a big a impact on your boxing sessions.

you should be lifting weights in comparison to your 1 rep max if you do lift weights and doing 3*5 sets it should be around 70-80% 1 rep max. ive never heard bout this starting off light and building up thing. sure what your lifting when you start and what you lift 3 months later is going to be alot diffrent but they should both be about 70-80% your 1 rep max, and 80-90% if your doing 3*3.

and 70-90% your 1 rep max dosnt seem like the kind of thing that isnt going to be putting stress on your muscles.

Darkstranger
10-08-2010, 08:19 AM
you should be lifting weights in comparison to your 1 rep max if you do lift weights and doing 3*5 sets it should be around 70-80% 1 rep max. ive never heard bout this starting off light and building up thing. sure what your lifting when you start and what you lift 3 months later is going to be alot diffrent but they should both be about 70-80% your 1 rep max, and 80-90% if your doing 3*3.

and 70-90% your 1 rep max dosnt seem like the kind of thing that isnt going to be putting stress on your muscles.

You start off light to reduce the amount of DOMs when you first start training. He's a beginner. The worst thing you can do is get someone deadlifting and squatting at 70%-80% of their 1 rep max straight away. The light stuff early on is also good for getting your technique right. Squats and Deadlifts are very unforgiving if you have poor technique.

This is why I said you have to be smart in order to include strength training with your boxing sessions.