View Full Version : What does it mean to say that a fighter is "in his prime"?


SBleeder
08-09-2010, 01:17 PM
What does it mean to say that a fighter is "in his prime"?

What does it mean to say that a fighter is "past his prime"?

GymRat
08-09-2010, 01:27 PM
What does it mean to say that a fighter is "in his prime"?

What does it mean to say that a fighter is "past his prime"?

As I explained to you in the other threads, basically:
1.) Being on top of your game.
2.) Being in tip-top shape, both physically and mentally.
3.) Having and maintaining the sharpened skills necessary to beat opponents who face you.
4.) Defeating all (or at least most) of the opponents you face.

Ziggy Stardust
08-09-2010, 10:19 PM
A fighter is in his prime when he has the maturity and experience to go along with undiminished reflexes. Once his reflexes start to slide he's past-prime, simple as that. When his reflexes are gone he's a shot fighter. Age has nothing to do it beyond the fact that I can't recall seeing a fighter older than his early 30s that still had his reflexes fully intact.

Poet

talip bin osman
08-09-2010, 10:31 PM
A fighter is in his prime when he has the maturity and experience to go along with undiminished reflexes. Once his reflexes start to slide he's past-prime, simple as that. When his reflexes are gone he's a shot fighter. Age has nothing to do it beyond the fact that I can't recall seeing a fighter older than his early 30s that still had his reflexes fully intact.

Poet

roy jones when most of his reflexes left him along with his freakish athleticism, and with no solid fundamentals to rely on became a very beatable fighter...

very much in contrast to fighters with excellent longevity relying with their fundamentals to compete against younger and bigger foes like duran and hopkins...

SBleeder
08-10-2010, 12:34 AM
As I explained to you in the other threads, basically:
1.) Being on top of your game.
2.) Being in tip-top shape, both physically and mentally.
3.) Having and maintaining the sharpened skills necessary to beat opponents who face you.
4.) Defeating all (or at least most) of the opponents you face.

By that definition, a fighter's prime could consist of only one fight. Is that acceptable?

Ziggy Stardust
08-10-2010, 12:37 AM
roy jones when most of his reflexes left him along with his freakish athleticism, and with no solid fundamentals to rely on became a very beatable fighter...

very much in contrast to fighters with excellent longevity relying with their fundamentals to compete against younger and bigger foes like duran and hopkins...

Some fighters are able to make adjustments and continue to have success after they reach past-prime status.....some, like roy jones, can't.

Poet

Megamasterking
08-10-2010, 01:50 AM
For me, it's starts when a boxer is physically and mentally mature, we know that it will be different for every boxer.

For exemple: i'm 42 now and consider myself way past prime. From what i can remembered, i was prime from 25 to 35, at 38 i was past prime. I still have power, but at 25 i could go to the gym 6 times a week and run 6 km a day, at 42 i would be dead if i was doing that !

GymRat
08-10-2010, 03:46 AM
By that definition, a fighter's prime could consist of only one fight. Is that acceptable?

Sure. Maybe not acceptable, but it can be that way. Mostly fighters are in their prime for a streak of 10 or more fights or so, so being prime for only one fight is rare. If a prime Roberto Duran beat someone clearly and most skillfully and then took two years off and partied, got fat, didn't train, and dropped the ball entirely and then fought the same person he steamrolled last fight and he lost embarrassingly this time (or won, either way), he would no longer be in his prime.

frankenfrank
08-10-2010, 05:21 AM
When the boxer is healthy and has experience against elite level fighters , or at least dangerous opponents.

-CANE-
08-10-2010, 08:59 AM
On here it means when Tyson was champion and unbeatable by any other fighter in history.

Ziggy Stardust
08-10-2010, 09:03 AM
On here it means when Tyson was champion and unbeatable by any other fighter in history.

I almost spewed my coffee when I read that :rofl9:

Poet

SplitSecond
08-10-2010, 10:41 AM
it's nothin more than an opinion boxing fans have, and therefore it differs from person to person

SBleeder
08-10-2010, 10:46 AM
Sure. Maybe not acceptable, but it can be that way. Mostly fighters are in their prime for a streak of 10 or more fights or so, so being prime for only one fight is rare. If a prime Roberto Duran beat someone clearly and most skillfully and then took two years off and partied, got fat, didn't train, and dropped the ball entirely and then fought the same person he steamrolled last fight and he lost embarrassingly this time (or won, either way), he would no longer be in his prime.

In that case Riddick Bowe is the greatest fighter of all time.

Ziggy Stardust
08-10-2010, 10:52 AM
it's nothin more than an opinion boxing fans have, and therefore it differs from person to person

Opinions are like azzholes: The wrong people have them and they're all full of sh1t :bullsh1t9:

Poet

Vadrigar.
08-10-2010, 11:04 AM
peak reflexes, peak speed, peak stamina etc... but it's harder to actually judge what point it is.

Steak
08-10-2010, 12:12 PM
its simply the period of time(or fight) where you are your overall best.

Miburo
08-10-2010, 02:09 PM
At the peak of his abilities.