View Full Version : Dempsey, Liston, Haye workouts


STILL_DETOX
07-13-2010, 06:28 PM
The evolution of a heavyweight

JACK DEMPSEY, HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION 1919-26
‘Your basic training day runs 15 hours, from 6am to 9pm, with 15 rounds of various kinds of boxing [sparring, heavy bag, speed bag, shadowboxing], plus your roadwork, running five or six miles’ - A Flame of Pure Fire; Jack Dempsey and the Roaring 20s

SONNY LISTON, HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION 1962-64
‘Preparing for the biggest fight of his life [against Floyd Patterson for the title in 1962], Liston fortifies himself with two meals a day, walks seven miles in 7lb shoes, shadowboxes four rounds and skips for nine minutes to a jazz recording of The Night Train. Sometimes he rides a red bicycle’ - Newsweek

DAVID HAYE, CRUISERWEIGHT CHAMPION 2006-08
‘I don’t run long distances, I do a lot of sprint work and weight training, which some people in boxing regard as taboo. It’s not the type of stuff other boxers do, but they are the guys who have stayed at British level while I have moved on to the undisputed world championship’

7
The number of meals that David Haye eats per day. The meals contain a lot of raw vegetables and rare steaks and portions are double what he used to eat as a cruiserweight when he fought at just over 14st. He now tips the scales at 16st 2¾lb

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/more_sport/article4449284.ece

SBleeder
07-13-2010, 10:27 PM
So does that mean Liston did no running?

With all of that so-called evolution in training, Liston and Dempsey would murder Haye inside of three rounds.

BrooklynBomber
07-13-2010, 10:59 PM
Hayes training makes sense as running spring does suit boxers better then steady pace running.

dannnnn
07-13-2010, 11:50 PM
Hayes training makes sense as running spring does suit boxers better then steady pace running.

But then again Haye has a known stamina issue.

βetamax
07-14-2010, 06:16 AM
I read here (http://www.boxingscene.com/forums/showthread.php?t=231098)that Haye will do 100 meter sprints, 100 times in a row with 30 second rest in between. I'm not sure how credible this as the guy just wrote this without anyway of verifying it but even assuming he did read this is that publication, I have a hard time believing it. Sprinting 100m, jogging back, then repeat x 10 can brutal let alone 10 times that.

Heru
07-14-2010, 08:49 AM
But then again Haye has a known stamina issue.

:rofl: Exactly...

Long distance running is steadily being underrated and replaced by sprints. Running at a steady pace for 60-90 minutes (IMO) is more effective than the short bursts of sprints.

If Haye switched his routine to include daily LDR, he would notice the difference. He might be able to average 30 punches per round if he did.

Sam Donald
07-14-2010, 09:13 AM
:rofl: Exactly...

Long distance running is steadily being underrated and replaced by sprints. Running at a steady pace for 60-90 minutes (IMO) is more effective than the short bursts of sprints.

If Haye switched his routine to include daily LDR, he would notice the difference. He might be able to average 30 punches per round if he did.

Mixing them both in ur reg works best

Spartacus Sully
07-14-2010, 09:14 AM
:rofl: Exactly...

Long distance running is steadily being underrated and replaced by sprints. Running at a steady pace for 60-90 minutes (IMO) is more effective than the short bursts of sprints.

If Haye switched his routine to include daily LDR, he would notice the difference. He might be able to average 30 punches per round if he did.

Sprints are great bob fitzsimmons and jeffries both included sprinting in their training with jeffries known for running 100 yards in the low 10's but their bread and butter were the long runs.

rockymarciano1
07-15-2010, 02:52 PM
"Championship Fighting":

DAILY WORKOUT ROUTINE:*
0600: Wake up, drink a hot cup of hot tea or broth (chicken or beef)
0630: Hit the road for your roadwork
0700: Go home, quick cool-down and shower, eat a breakfast of fruit juice, cereal, eggs, and milk/tea.
1230: Eat a lunch of lettuce and tomato on basil bread (with 2-3 slices of bacon), glass of milk or cup of tea. If you don't use bacon with the sandwich you can have a malted milk.
1800: Gymwork. Have a cup of hot tea with lemon before you work out.
1915: Workout completed, go home
1930: Eat dinner: half grapefruit or glass of fruit juice (or a cup or broth); a salad with olive oil and perhaps lemon juice; meat, boiled or broiled, never fried; steaks, chops, or chicken; stews are good for weight gain; baked potatoes are too; no pork, veal, lobster, shrimp, crab, or starchy foods like spaghetti. For dessert: stewed fruit, prunes, apriocots, pears, rhubarb, etc., and a cup of hot tea. NO PASTRIES.
2015: Relax for half an hour.
2045: Take a light 15-min walk.
2100: Go to bed.

Dempsey would sometimes either take only 1 day off a week or, if he felt like he was overtraining too much, he would actually take a week off during his pre-fight training.*

Roadwork: Dempsey liked to run shorter distances than a lot of the other boxers in his era (some of those old timers would run 150 miles per week!). He mixed up 100m sprints and rounds of shadowboxing in with his runs. He recommends starting off with 1/2 mile each day for 7 days, then slowly working it up to 2 miles a day.

Gymwork: Here's a basic schedule he recommends for the aspiring fighter to get started.

**Shadowboxing, 2 rounds
**Sparring, 3 rounds
**Heavy bag, 2 rounds
**Speed bag, 3 rounds
**Rope skipping, 2-3 rounds
**Calisthenics, 2 rounds
**5 minute "sweat-out" in the sauna followed by a shower

Shadowboxing: He sees this as a very important part of your training, almost as important as sparring. Make sure you're using your footwork and actually fight an opponent. Wear your gloves when you shadowbox so you get even more of a workout from it.

Sparring: The most important exercise. Go hard on each other but don't kill each other. You are sparring to learn after all. Use protection when you need to.

Heavy Bag: Start off with 2-minute rounds and work your way up to 3-minute rounds. The first 60 seconds of each round he worked on bobbing and weaving followed by counter punches.*

Speed Bag: A great exercise in his opinion. Again, start off with 2-minute rounds and work your way up to 3-minute rounds. Devote the first 60 seconds of speed bag work on the straight backhand combination (left straight-left backhand-right straight-right backhand). The rest of the round, hit hard with everything else.

Rope Skipping: Don't "hippity hop like a schoolgirl." Bounce off one foot then the other, it will be awkward at first but be patient and you'll reap big results.

Calisthenics: Situps with arms extended over your head (he preferred straight-legged, but bend your knees), twisting situps (go up, twist sharply to left then right, then go back down), back bridges, wall pulley work, pushups, medicine ball tosses against the stomach (though he recommends several months of situps before a beginner tries these), and a neck exercise where you turn your head to the side and jut your chin out past your shoulder, moving only your chin. He also did a lot of manual physical work (he was a miner at one point) and was a monster with pull-ups (sometimes doing up to 200 per day!). Sitting and standing forward and side bends were also used for his midsection.*

Other Training Tidbits:
**He recommended using camphored ice on skinned knuckles right before bed.
**During his workout, you would often see him chewing on gum made out of pine tar. It was very sticky and thick, so boxers during that day used to chew lots of it in the hopes that it would give them a tougher chin.
**He would also bathe his hands and face in beef brine, as he felt it toughened up your skin like old leather. He was prone to cuts at times, so he began to "skin toughen" his face by rubbing around cut-prone areas with his thumbs vigorously (until it was raw but not bleeding) to develop calluses there.

http://www.kyokushin4life.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8328

Spartacus Sully
07-15-2010, 04:17 PM
**During his workout, you would often see him chewing on gum made out of pine tar. It was very sticky and thick, so boxers during that day used to chew lots of it in the hopes that it would give them a tougher chin.



you should be careful not to over do it if you get this stuff. like for a little bit when you first get it i would recommend not chewing it every other day.

BrooklynBomber
07-15-2010, 07:05 PM
But then again Haye has a known stamina issue.

It's like deadlifts and squats, you cant do one and not do another. But partially substituting your steady pace running drills with sprints is a must in today;s environement. Steady pace running has a tendency to plateou in results, sprints do not.

DempseyMarciano
07-15-2010, 07:30 PM
"Championship Fighting":

DAILY WORKOUT ROUTINE:*
0600: Wake up, drink a hot cup of hot tea or broth (chicken or beef)
0630: Hit the road for your roadwork
0700: Go home, quick cool-down and shower, eat a breakfast of fruit juice, cereal, eggs, and milk/tea.
1230: Eat a lunch of lettuce and tomato on basil bread (with 2-3 slices of bacon), glass of milk or cup of tea. If you don't use bacon with the sandwich you can have a malted milk.
1800: Gymwork. Have a cup of hot tea with lemon before you work out.
1915: Workout completed, go home
1930: Eat dinner: half grapefruit or glass of fruit juice (or a cup or broth); a salad with olive oil and perhaps lemon juice; meat, boiled or broiled, never fried; steaks, chops, or chicken; stews are good for weight gain; baked potatoes are too; no pork, veal, lobster, shrimp, crab, or starchy foods like spaghetti. For dessert: stewed fruit, prunes, apriocots, pears, rhubarb, etc., and a cup of hot tea. NO PASTRIES.
2015: Relax for half an hour.
2045: Take a light 15-min walk.
2100: Go to bed.

Dempsey would sometimes either take only 1 day off a week or, if he felt like he was overtraining too much, he would actually take a week off during his pre-fight training.*

Roadwork: Dempsey liked to run shorter distances than a lot of the other boxers in his era (some of those old timers would run 150 miles per week!). He mixed up 100m sprints and rounds of shadowboxing in with his runs. He recommends starting off with 1/2 mile each day for 7 days, then slowly working it up to 2 miles a day.

Gymwork: Here's a basic schedule he recommends for the aspiring fighter to get started.

**Shadowboxing, 2 rounds
**Sparring, 3 rounds
**Heavy bag, 2 rounds
**Speed bag, 3 rounds
**Rope skipping, 2-3 rounds
**Calisthenics, 2 rounds
**5 minute "sweat-out" in the sauna followed by a shower

Shadowboxing: He sees this as a very important part of your training, almost as important as sparring. Make sure you're using your footwork and actually fight an opponent. Wear your gloves when you shadowbox so you get even more of a workout from it.

Sparring: The most important exercise. Go hard on each other but don't kill each other. You are sparring to learn after all. Use protection when you need to.

Heavy Bag: Start off with 2-minute rounds and work your way up to 3-minute rounds. The first 60 seconds of each round he worked on bobbing and weaving followed by counter punches.*

Speed Bag: A great exercise in his opinion. Again, start off with 2-minute rounds and work your way up to 3-minute rounds. Devote the first 60 seconds of speed bag work on the straight backhand combination (left straight-left backhand-right straight-right backhand). The rest of the round, hit hard with everything else.

Rope Skipping: Don't "hippity hop like a schoolgirl." Bounce off one foot then the other, it will be awkward at first but be patient and you'll reap big results.

Calisthenics: Situps with arms extended over your head (he preferred straight-legged, but bend your knees), twisting situps (go up, twist sharply to left then right, then go back down), back bridges, wall pulley work, pushups, medicine ball tosses against the stomach (though he recommends several months of situps before a beginner tries these), and a neck exercise where you turn your head to the side and jut your chin out past your shoulder, moving only your chin. He also did a lot of manual physical work (he was a miner at one point) and was a monster with pull-ups (sometimes doing up to 200 per day!). Sitting and standing forward and side bends were also used for his midsection.*

Other Training Tidbits:
**He recommended using camphored ice on skinned knuckles right before bed.
**During his workout, you would often see him chewing on gum made out of pine tar. It was very sticky and thick, so boxers during that day used to chew lots of it in the hopes that it would give them a tougher chin.
**He would also bathe his hands and face in beef brine, as he felt it toughened up your skin like old leather. He was prone to cuts at times, so he began to "skin toughen" his face by rubbing around cut-prone areas with his thumbs vigorously (until it was raw but not bleeding) to develop calluses there.

http://www.kyokushin4life.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8328

I'm glad to see some people out there still revere the old timers. I personally follow this regime, with some modifications. I believe that the majority of fighters today whether it's boxing or MMA, train for short fights. Everything fighters do today seems like they're only thinking it's going to be a short fight, so alot of them cut corners. Then they get into deep waters, and they're legs drop from underneath them.