View Full Version : Workouts for the weaklings


The Stretch
07-03-2010, 08:46 PM
Here's the deal, I'm a hard worker, my determinations off the charts, and no matter how hard the challange I'll always keep trying 'till I win.

The problem... I can hardly run for a few seconds without almost passing out, or do an olympic workout on a punching bag before I get winded a little bit after I start. I have no abs or muscle, and no stamina what so ever.

Now don't get me wrong, I'm not like one of those big fat dudes who can't go up the steps without getting winded. On the contrary, I'm very thin with almost no bodyfat. I almost look like a spaghetti noodle: Thin and limp...

But I'm willing to muscle through any exercise given to me, but since I have no boxing gyms around where I live I can't get propper training, and this is my next to last chance on possibly becoming professional. You tell me to do 100 push ups? I'll get down in front of the computer and do them. Run 10 miles? No problem, I'll be right back. I need to make myself strong, so I'm willing to take up any routine you tell me to do for how long you want me to do it.

As for my resources, I have a punching bag (80lbs.) a speed bag (Large) and a jump rope.

As for my body, I'm around 145 lbs. on an empty stomach. My reach is 180cm. from fingertip to fingertip, and I'm also 6ft. tall.

As for my prefered "Style" and stance, I want to copy Thomas Hearns, with the Hitman Style and the Flicker Jab. I know it's advanced for someone like me, but I feel comfortable with it because of my reach.

So at the risk of sounding dramatic, (or like a total idiot)... Where should I start?

Righthandbanger
07-03-2010, 08:56 PM
at a boxing gym. I'm sorry but its the only way.

look up online, find a gym and make it happen. move if you have to.

you can only get to being a pro one way and that is by training at a boxing gym.

DIB42
07-03-2010, 09:03 PM
at a boxing gym. I'm sorry but its the only way.

look up online, find a gym and make it happen. move if you have to.

you can only get to being a pro one way and that is by training at a boxing gym.

This is true, but it couldn't hurt too bad to check out some videos online and work on getting fit. Odds are if you pick up any punching and etc online you'll do it wrong and a gym will have to fix it anyway.

The Stretch
07-03-2010, 09:09 PM
Oh yeah... One more thing I forgot to mention.

I'm 16.

And I have no boxing gyms to go to that ain't 50 miles away from where I live.

Add the fact that I don't have any money and I'm in a pretty bad situation.

Now my family's moving to Flordia within the year, so maybe I can just work on getting used to the workout routines and diets before I go pro.

DIB42
07-04-2010, 01:23 AM
Oh yeah... One more thing I forgot to mention.

I'm 16.

And I have no boxing gyms to go to that ain't 50 miles away from where I live.

Add the fact that I don't have any money and I'm in a pretty bad situation.

Now my family's moving to Flordia within the year, so maybe I can just work on getting used to the workout routines and diets before I go pro.

You'll find alot of guys at the gym that don't have any money and are in bad situations.

50miles away, you got a bus pass? How fast can you jog? get a bike...

Just kidding (well except for the bus pass thing) you can afford a boxing gym membership, they're usually very reasonable, and you're sixteen, you can get a partime job.

Look for routines online, and commit. When you move to florida, maybe you'll find a gym there.

DIB42
07-04-2010, 01:25 AM
Here's the deal, I'm a hard worker, my determinations off the charts, and no matter how hard the challange I'll always keep trying 'till I win.

The problem... I can hardly run for a few seconds without almost passing out, or do an olympic workout on a punching bag before I get winded a little bit after I start. I have no abs or muscle, and no stamina what so ever.

Now don't get me wrong, I'm not like one of those big fat dudes who can't go up the steps without getting winded. On the contrary, I'm very thin with almost no bodyfat. I almost look like a spaghetti noodle: Thin and limp...

But I'm willing to muscle through any exercise given to me, but since I have no boxing gyms around where I live I can't get propper training, and this is my next to last chance on possibly becoming professional. You tell me to do 100 push ups? I'll get down in front of the computer and do them. Run 10 miles? No problem, I'll be right back. I need to make myself strong, so I'm willing to take up any routine you tell me to do for how long you want me to do it.

As for my resources, I have a punching bag (80lbs.) a speed bag (Large) and a jump rope.

As for my body, I'm around 145 lbs. on an empty stomach. My reach is 180cm. from fingertip to fingertip, and I'm also 6ft. tall.

As for my prefered "Style" and stance, I want to copy Thomas Hearns, with the Hitman Style and the Flicker Jab. I know it's advanced for someone like me, but I feel comfortable with it because of my reach.

So at the risk of sounding dramatic, (or like a total idiot)... Where should I start?

My routine would be, jog 10 miles, walk 5 miles, jog/run 10 miles, skip rope for 25 miles, and then sign the membership to the gym thats 50 miles away.

All joking aside, dig through the archives of this forum theres lots of good stuff, check out you tube videos, theres probably one specifically for Tommy Hearns jab, work out, get a part time job, be successful in school, see if the YMCA or the Boys and Girls club have any kind of boxing class.

Also check with your city, theres a crazy drunk in every town that was a golden gloves boxer at one point.

karategan
07-04-2010, 10:12 AM
Try real hard to access a boxing gym. That's the only way you're going to learn boxing.

As for general fitness, do some running of course to build up stamina. Increase distance everyday until you can handle 3-5 miles. Do some strength training to... well, build up your strength. A great routine is this:

forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=998224
(it takes a while to learn proper technique on lifts)

Also eat moar (healthy foods like milk) and over your BMR to pack on some weight and muscle.

Yael The Great
07-06-2010, 06:49 PM
I just started boxing today in a PAL ( Police Atletic League) boxing league, the prices range from 0- 75 a year in NYC, don't know where you live but most states have a PAL league so research them in your area. Next don't say how determined or tough you are because it makes you sound ****y. Good luck on finding a gym.

lianpeng
07-06-2010, 10:03 PM
HaHA! I have already seen the great thing!!!

DR.ORGYY
07-06-2010, 10:06 PM
get to a gym........

Equilibrium
07-06-2010, 11:13 PM
Stop telling the guy to get to a gym, it's obviously the best thing to do but he said he has no access to any gym.

As for the op, weaklings and going pro don't mix together, going pro is not something you can do over night.


First thing you should do is push ups, sit ups, dips and possibly pull ups anytime you can.

At the beginning you might just be able to do 10 or 20 push ups, maybe less. But it's ok, do what you can. If the day after you are sore, take a day off from those and do it again when you feel less sore.

Also jogging will help you build your cardio a lot, once again, start slowly. If you can only run for 30 seconds, run for 30 seconds, then walk a bit, run again, ect.

As far as technique goes, going to the gym would be ideal because trainers will keep you away from bad habits. But if you want to learn some basics check this youtube channel out:

http://www.youtube.com/user/billiardjay#p/u


If you check the older videos there are TONS of boxing instructional videos, you could definitely learn a good lot from that.


The stuff you learn from that, you use on the heavybag and when you shadowbox.

Yael The Great
07-06-2010, 11:16 PM
Stop telling the guy to get to a gym, it's obviously the best thing to do but he said he has no access to any gym.

As for the op, weaklings and going pro don't mix together, going pro is not something you can do over night.


First thing you should do is push ups, sit ups, dips and possibly pull ups anytime you can.

At the beginning you might just be able to do 10 or 20 push ups, maybe less. But it's ok, do what you can. If the day after you are sore, take a day off from those and do it again when you feel less sore.

Also jogging will help you build your cardio a lot, once again, start slowly. If you can only run for 30 seconds, run for 30 seconds, then walk a bit, run again, ect.

As far as technique goes, going to the gym would be ideal because trainers will keep you away from bad habits. But if you want to learn some basics check this youtube channel out:

http://www.youtube.com/user/billiardjay#p/u


If you check the older videos there are TONS of boxing instructional videos, you could definitely learn a good lot from that.


The stuff you learn from that, you use on the heavybag and when you shadowbox.

Because all boxers learn their basics online!
Just try to find a good gym, where do you live by the way.

Trick
07-07-2010, 12:56 AM
Also check with your city, theres a crazy drunk in every town that was a golden gloves boxer at one point.

Hahaha

Well like everyone else said, you won't make real progress until you get yourself to a gym. I'd be careful about going too hard on real boxing techniques on your own lest you develop a million bad habits. If you really want to start on your own though, nothing's stopping you from filming it and putting it out there for advice, sift through the haters and there would probably be some helpful stuff.

Above all I'd just work on your fitness though. If you gas out like you said you do I'd advise you to work on that before you go talk to a trainer regardless. For that it's pretty simple, and I'd probably just be repeating what others have said. I'd really focus on pull/chinups and different variations of them. Don't under-estimate pushups (and variations of them...) despite being pedestrian they're quite useful. There's about a million and one ab exercises online- check them out. Do bodyweight squats, perhaps even constantly for the length of boxing rounds. And finally, run. If you can't run 100m without falling over, no one will take you seriously no matter how hard you say you're willing to try. And quite frankly, if you can't push yourself at least for a mile or two, you're probably not actually willing to push yourself all that hard. A fight may only be ~10min, but most fighters train 2-3 hours (in the evenings)- hard. You need that endurance and there's only one, ****ty way to get it- busting your balls.

Being in crazy good shape doesn't make a fighter, but it's a good start. In a year's time you'll hopefully find a gym in Florida. Oh, and 145lbs for a 6 foot 16 year old isn't really that skinny. You have the frame for some muscle- just gotta work at it.

Equilibrium
07-07-2010, 01:22 AM
Because all boxers learn their basics online!
Just try to find a good gym, where do you live by the way.


Did you even read my post? I said that finding a gym is the best thing, but he said there are no gym close to where he lives.

So checking out some instructional videos > Doing nothing.

Squirrel
07-07-2010, 05:35 AM
Well if you have no gym access right now, start getting in shape and building up your strength. Start doing sprints, jogging, swimming, bodyweight exercise etc - good thing is they're all free! (well, swimming may not be).

Also, no one has mentioned this yet oddly enough, get a book/go online and start shadow boxing. Shadowboxing is one of the most overlooked aspects of training imo and again its free. Start doing it and dont stop!

Yael The Great
07-07-2010, 07:36 AM
Did you even read my post? I said that finding a gym is the best thing, but he said there are no gym close to where he lives.

So checking out some instructional videos > Doing nothing.

Doing Nothing> insructional videos
Unless he finds the most comprehensive video there is, he is bound to do something wrong and have bad technique.

The Stretch
07-07-2010, 08:48 PM
Alright, so I should do some running, push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups, and shadow boxing. All right!

Um, how do you shadow box? It just looks like everyone who does it are just punching all over the place...

Yael The Great
07-07-2010, 09:27 PM
Alright, so I should do some running, push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups, and shadow boxing. All right!

Um, how do you shadow box? It just looks like everyone who does it are just punching all over the place...

You should do all those exercises and you should find a gym. That is how you would learn how to properly box and shadow box. I'm sorry, but I doubt you have NO gyms within a 50 mile radius, that is a large radius. By the way where do you live.

Danny Gunz
07-07-2010, 09:32 PM
You said your moving to florida, so join a local gym (not boxing since there are none near you) lift some weights, gain some muscle, get good workouts in and start a good diet and then when you get to florida join a boxing gym there.

Im assuming that there is at least a regular gym near if there isnt just start running as much as you can and get used to a good diet.

The Stretch
07-07-2010, 09:32 PM
I live out in the country in the state of ohio, WAY out in the country. There are only small towns around here, and none of them have a boxing gym.

Spartacus Sully
07-08-2010, 12:00 AM
I live out in the country in the state of ohio, WAY out in the country. There are only small towns around here, and none of them have a boxing gym.

you can teach yourself to box at home it just takes like 10 times more dedication then just paying the monthly fee at your local gym and showing up twice a week.

id reccomend you read http://www.freecirclefighting.com/jdbook.pdf

to get the basic idea of stance and guard. it also contains tons of other useful information but your not going to be able to utilize it for atleast a year. plus things have changed alittle since 1950 so everything may not be exact to current day.

your going to want a heavy bag and a video camera so you can watch your self after your done on the bag or shadow boxing. you can also go 2 min round on the bag, watch your self for mistakes, 2 min round on the bag, watch your self for mistakes you can also do 3 mins or even a few rounds then watch for mistakes.

your also going to want a some what athelitic friend whos willing to spar you and listen to your advice so they get better at boxing as well.

so lets start with the jab.

your going to get into stance (chapter 11), chin tucked, put your guard up, and get in front of a mirror. so the jab has a few parts to it, so your going to raise up your left shoulder and throw your hand out their with it to jab make suer the force is coming from the raising of your left shoulder and not your arm, the fist and arm should also come out completely straight from where it was pointed when you threw it.

when you jab look at your self in the mirror look at your waist. when you throw the jab your waist should be moving, not rotating just moving a very little bit kinda just swaying or rocking. im sure you can find videos of people jabbing on line look around and look for this waist movement.

next when your looking at your self your going to look at your right shoulder when you jab. now even with your left shoulder jutting up and your waist rocking this right shoulder of yours should not be moving at all. if your right shoulder is moving its not a jab its a left straight and your not working on the left straights now. plus with your right moving your become less square and you telegraph your punches.

One more round
07-08-2010, 01:11 AM
you can teach yourself to box at home it just takes like 10 times more dedication then just paying the monthly fee at your local gym and showing up twice a week.

id reccomend you read http://www.freecirclefighting.com/jdbook.pdf

to get the basic idea of stance and guard. it also contains tons of other useful information but your not going to be able to utilize it for atleast a year. plus things have changed alittle since 1950 so everything may not be exact to current day.

your going to want a heavy bag and a video camera so you can watch your self after your done on the bag or shadow boxing. you can also go 2 min round on the bag, watch your self for mistakes, 2 min round on the bag, watch your self for mistakes you can also do 3 mins or even a few rounds then watch for mistakes.

your also going to want a some what athelitic friend whos willing to spar you and listen to your advice so they get better at boxing as well.

so lets start with the jab.

your going to get into stance (chapter 11), chin tucked, put your guard up, and get in front of a mirror. so the jab has a few parts to it, so your going to raise up your left shoulder and throw your hand out their with it to jab make suer the force is coming from the raising of your left shoulder and not your arm, the fist and arm should also come out completely straight from where it was pointed when you threw it.

when you jab look at your self in the mirror look at your waist. when you throw the jab your waist should be moving, not rotating just moving a very little bit kinda just swaying or rocking. im sure you can find videos of people jabbing on line look around and look for this waist movement.

next when your looking at your self your going to look at your right shoulder when you jab. now even with your left shoulder jutting up and your waist rocking this right shoulder of yours should not be moving at all. if your right shoulder is moving its not a jab its a left straight and your not working on the left straights now. plus with your right moving your become less square and you telegraph your punches.


A good boxer has never been made without a trainer. Waste of time trying to teach yourself.

One more round
07-08-2010, 01:20 AM
Sorry but to become a fighter, you need to get to a gym. You say you are moving to Florida? I'm sure there would be plenty of gyms there. My advice would be to start running, start with 2 miles and build up to 4. Keep a steady pace and push yourself. After a few weeks start doing sprints, like one lap of a football field or running track, then rest for 30 seconds and repeat 4-5 times. Also start doing as many pushups and situps as you can in sets of 10 or 20 (then build up gradually)

Keep doing that, running and doing push-ups/situps at least every other day, until you move to Florida. That should have you in solid enough shape and you will be ready to learn boxing at a proper gym when you get near one. (hopefully in Florida)

I would forget the heavy bag, forget punching at all until you get to a gym and learn it properly, doing it yourself will build bad habits that will take considerable time to erase.

Maybe use the jumping rope a bit too, go for as long as you can and build up.

Bascially I'm saying just get in shape with running and bodyweight exercises, until you move and hopefully get within reach of a gym.

Spartacus Sully
07-08-2010, 01:23 AM
A good boxer has never been made without a trainer. Waste of time trying to teach yourself.

a trainer dosnt need to come from a gym. people like dempsey who learned how to box solely from the little tidbits he picked up along his way and practice did he have a trainer? yes every body he met was his trainer.

did he pay some trainer 100$ a month to teach him to box? no.

what about marciano? im sure in the early times he didnt have a trainer and id bet when he was spending hours on his 300? lb heavy bag there wasnt a trainer there either but if it wasnt for the lack of a trainer he would never have never learned how to throw the hooks he threw and probly would have lost a ****load more with out that one hit ko power coming from an unorthodox punch that any current day trainer would put an end to.

a trainer is no different then watching youtube training videos. its just another guy that used to box, never made anything of himself, and now thinks that because he used to box even though he failed at it he has every right to physically and technically train new up and coming boxers. sure he might have some useful things to say but that dosnt mean any of it is correct.

One more round
07-08-2010, 02:11 AM
a trainer dosnt need to come from a gym. people like dempsey who learned how to box solely from the little tidbits he picked up along his way and practice did he have a trainer? yes every body he met was his trainer.

did he pay some trainer 100$ a month to teach him to box? no.

what about marciano? im sure in the early times he didnt have a trainer and id bet when he was spending hours on his 300? lb heavy bag there wasnt a trainer there either but if it wasnt for the lack of a trainer he would never have never learned how to throw the hooks he threw and probly would have lost a ****load more with out that one hit ko power coming from an unorthodox punch that any current day trainer would put an end to.
a trainer is no different then watching youtube training videos. its just another guy that used to box, never made anything of himself, and now thinks that because he used to box even though he failed at it he has every right to physically and technically train new up and coming boxers. sure he might have some useful things to say but that dosnt mean any of it is correct.

You have no idea what you are talking about. End of story. You don't need to pay a trainer 100 a month, that is way too much. I've seen good trainers coach for free.

"a trainer is no different then watching youtube training videos" stupidest thing I've read on this board in while. If you had any level of experience as a boxer, you would know that that's a load of ****.

The Stretch
07-08-2010, 02:37 AM
Nnnggh... I don't know who to listen to!

Should I try teaching myself boxing, and possibly get better at the risk of learning bad technique?

Or should I just try getting fit, but risk not having any idea how to fight?

I know there are boxing legends out there who started off training by themselves, but is that just natural talent that let them be so great? Or was it really just because they worked hard teaching themselves to box?

Maybe if I just tried to learn just a little technique? Nothing big like Hooks and Uppercuts. Maybe just stances and Jabs. But what about the Speedbag? Could I suffer from bad technique by not having a trainer there while I practice on it? And could just trying to punch the Heavybag actually make me worse at punching right?

Waah! I don't know what to do!

Spartacus Sully
07-08-2010, 02:47 AM
You have no idea what you are talking about. End of story. You don't need to pay a trainer 100 a month, that is way too much. I've seen good trainers coach for free.

"a trainer is no different then watching youtube training videos" stupidest thing I've read on this board in while. If you had any level of experience as a boxer, you would know that that's a load of ****.

100$ is what the mma/boxing gym charged me to do 40 mins of jump rope push ups jump squats and sit ups then 20 mins or 3 rounds of shadow boxing/pratice with a partner and 3 rounds of heavy bag.

sure watching a video on you tube and actually having some there watching you do it and critique you is diffrent but the information is all the same and if you know the information then you can watch and critique your self and work on what needs improvement.

Spartacus Sully
07-08-2010, 03:26 AM
Nnnggh... I don't know who to listen to!

Should I try teaching myself boxing, and possibly get better at the risk of learning bad technique?

Or should I just try getting fit, but risk not having any idea how to fight?

I know there are boxing legends out there who started off training by themselves, but is that just natural talent that let them be so great? Or was it really just because they worked hard teaching themselves to box?

Maybe if I just tried to learn just a little technique? Nothing big like Hooks and Uppercuts. Maybe just stances and Jabs. But what about the Speedbag? Could I suffer from bad technique by not having a trainer there while I practice on it? And could just trying to punch the Heavybag actually make me worse at punching right?

Waah! I don't know what to do!

any bad habits you learn will be straightened out at a gym with in a month assuming you continue to work hard.

what you dont want to do is join some mma/boxing gym just because your afraid of learning bad technique and then be stuck in a contract for the next year while your being taught by lazy half assed people that were trained there just like you only a few months ago but because the main thing they do is physical exercise not boxing it dosnt matter whos teaching you.

as far as speed bag and heavy bag it dosnt matter that much. you dont really need a speed bag but it has its uses so if you dont have one no big deal. if you do have one i reccomend its a large one and you just use it mainly for the back hand tatto.

on the fast, light bag-which is about the height of an opponents head-one can sharpen his speed and timing for "head-hunting"; and one also can practice the back-hand, warding-off stroke until it becomes automatic

check out chapter 21 and read about the glance off.
http://www.freecirclefighting.com/jdbook.pdf

If you watch a professional fighter punch the light bag, you'll note that more than half his bag-work comprises a rhythmic tattoo achieved like this: straight left - backhand left - straight right - backhand right -straight left - etc. You may ask, "Why this backhand striking, when the backhand blow is illegal in boxing?"

The answer to that is: He's sharpening his backhand for glance-offs and blocking. If you get a chance to use the light bag, spend half your time on that tattoo. A power-backhand for glancing and blocking is almost as useful for a fighter as is a good backhand for a tennis player.

as far as a heavy bag goes id recommend something light 40-60 pounds so if your form is bad you wont completely f**k up your wrists, and once your need a heavier bag id recommend just adding like 10 lb to the bag you already have with sand or something and slowly increasing the weight so your body can slowly become accustom to it building a much better foundation for you to build even further upon

at first just throw jabs, circle the bag (work foot work), get used to distance so the jab ends at the bag, chin tucked, stay wedge like and keep your right up. eventually when your comfortable with the jab and all that goes with it you can start throwing right straights and youll notice that youll start dropping your right all over again so then work on your jabs and right straights till you can do them with out dropping your right, keeping your chin tucked, circle the bag, and keep correct distance. then maybe throw in some bobbing and weaving and once again youll notice the right dropping ect ect so keep that up till you can do all of it with out making noticeable mistakes then the left straight out of the bob then the left hook then the right hook then upper cuts allways both concentrating on just the activity added in like bobbing or right hooks with the stance making sure everything is correct and guarded along with the added in activity mixed in with everything you already know.

if you ever have questions about how to throw this punch or that punch or if your doing one thing right or another thing dont just ask some one ask every one you can and listen/try everything you hear till you find what feels most right for you and works the best. when you start to throw right straights dont just listen to what it says in the dempsey book but do google searches and read every thing you can, search you tube and watch everything you can and then take this mass of imformation you now have and pick what makes sense and what dosnt then try it out on the bag or when sparring (your athletic friend who you spar and work with in learning how to box that you should have if you want to learn how to box on your own)and if it dosnt quite work remember that and improve it, if it does work remember that and improve it, if it only works in certain situations then remember that and improve it.

but the reality is that unless you get to a gym you will never box another person in an actual match.

One more round
07-09-2010, 08:06 AM
Nnnggh... I don't know who to listen to!

Should I try teaching myself boxing, and possibly get better at the risk of learning bad technique?

Or should I just try getting fit, but risk not having any idea how to fight?

I know there are boxing legends out there who started off training by themselves, but is that just natural talent that let them be so great? Or was it really just because they worked hard teaching themselves to box?

Maybe if I just tried to learn just a little technique? Nothing big like Hooks and Uppercuts. Maybe just stances and Jabs. But what about the Speedbag? Could I suffer from bad technique by not having a trainer there while I practice on it? And could just trying to punch the Heavybag actually make me worse at punching right?

Waah! I don't know what to do!

Maybe, at the very beginning of their interest in boxing, but they all very soon got trainers and it was then that they achieved success.

Doesn't matter how talented you are, you will never go anywhere without a trainer, you need to have a registered coach to fight in the first place ffs.

Honestly, take my advice. I'm not the most experienced on here, but I have some experience, more than enough to know that trying to teach yourself is stupid, and will get you no where.

Yael The Great
07-09-2010, 08:19 AM
Sorry but to become a fighter, you need to get to a gym. You say you are moving to Florida? I'm sure there would be plenty of gyms there. My advice would be to start running, start with 2 miles and build up to 4. Keep a steady pace and push yourself. After a few weeks start doing sprints, like one lap of a football field or running track, then rest for 30 seconds and repeat 4-5 times. Also start doing as many pushups and situps as you can in sets of 10 or 20 (then build up gradually)

Keep doing that, running and doing push-ups/situps at least every other day, until you move to Florida. That should have you in solid enough shape and you will be ready to learn boxing at a proper gym when you get near one. (hopefully in Florida)

I would forget the heavy bag, forget punching at all until you get to a gym and learn it properly, doing it yourself will build bad habits that will take considerable time to erase.

Maybe use the jumping rope a bit too, go for as long as you can and build up.

Bascially I'm saying just get in shape with running and bodyweight exercises, until you move and hopefully get within reach of a gym.

This is what you should listen to.

Spartacus Sully
07-09-2010, 09:06 AM
Heres a good manual from bob fitzsimmons back in 1901 so its got some really outdated stuff but its got alot of good information too.

http://books.google.com/books?id=ODYBeua_xEIC&dq=physical+culture+self+defense&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=JLDL14Fgxh&sig=GEto5ZvtF7w-lmAPdfSdGPPHZHI&hl=en&ei=FuuASvZ_qJK2B5Lr-NYK&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5#v=onepage&q&f=false

The Stretch
07-10-2010, 04:51 PM
Well... I just came back from a 5 mile jog... I think I over did it a little bit.

I'm now going to attempt to do 100 push ups and sit ups. Wish me luck.

T.Horton
07-10-2010, 05:14 PM
Well... I just came back from a 5 mile jog... I think I over did it a little bit.

I'm now going to attempt to do 100 push ups and sit ups. Wish me luck.You ran the whole five miles? Start off doing your push-ups and sit-ups in sets - I know it seems like an obvious thing but you'd be surprised at how many people balk at having do certain exercises because they think they have to do them all at once. Start by doing sets of twenty for example. In a couple of weeks do sets of thirty and so on.

#1Assassin
07-10-2010, 05:53 PM
any bad habits you learn will be straightened out at a gym with in a month assuming you continue to work hard.

thats not true at all, bad habits take much, much, MUCH longer time to get out of your system. could take up to a year if u are making alot of mistakes, which u will if u try to learn how to box on your own.

i can tell u dont know alot about boxing, thats fine everyone starts from nothing, but u cant learn without an actual trainer by your side. u need someone to tell u what u are doing right and wrong, and u will do things wrong at first, everyone does. its gonna be hard and confusing, u need someone to guide u through it or all u will do is create roadblocks for yourself.

Ruby Robert doesnt know what the hell hes talking about, One more round does, listen to him.

Sorry but to become a fighter, you need to get to a gym. You say you are moving to Florida? I'm sure there would be plenty of gyms there. My advice would be to start running, start with 2 miles and build up to 4. Keep a steady pace and push yourself. After a few weeks start doing sprints, like one lap of a football field or running track, then rest for 30 seconds and repeat 4-5 times. Also start doing as many pushups and situps as you can in sets of 10 or 20 (then build up gradually)

Keep doing that, running and doing push-ups/situps at least every other day, until you move to Florida. That should have you in solid enough shape and you will be ready to learn boxing at a proper gym when you get near one. (hopefully in Florida)

I would forget the heavy bag, forget punching at all until you get to a gym and learn it properly, doing it yourself will build bad habits that will take considerable time to erase.

Maybe use the jumping rope a bit too, go for as long as you can and build up.

Bascially I'm saying just get in shape with running and bodyweight exercises, until you move and hopefully get within reach of a gym.

^^^co sign.. this is the truth.

btw i was in almost the EXCACT same spot you are in a few years back. 16, a bit taller and skinnier but wanted to box and become a pro. i had no way to get to a gym, wanted to be exactly like tommy hearns and was just desperate for the chance to learn how to box. the first day i entered a gym was the best day of my life :)

one thing i can add to One more rounds post is to watch boxing. watch as much boxing as u can, u dont have to try to do what they do, just watch and study. start learning the mechanics of the sweet science so that u have an understanding of how the game works from the first time u step foot in a gym. know the various styles and how to adapt to them and a few tricks aswell. it will benefit u greatly and help make up for this time when u cant get to a boxing gym.

when i started boxing at 17 i had watched boxing for years, and bcuz of it i picked up alot quicker than all the other guys. had my first fight after 4 months.

Spartacus Sully
07-11-2010, 03:19 AM
thats not true at all, bad habits take much, much, MUCH longer time to get out of your system. could take up to a year if u are making alot of mistakes, which u will if u try to learn how to box on your own.

i can tell u dont know alot about boxing, thats fine everyone starts from nothing, but u cant learn without an actual trainer by your side. u need someone to tell u what u are doing right and wrong, and u will do things wrong at first, everyone does. its gonna be hard and confusing, u need someone to guide u through it or all u will do is create roadblocks for yourself.

Ruby Robert doesnt know what the hell hes talking about, One more round does, listen to him.


mistakes? so how long from when you started boxing till when you stopped making any mistakes? When did your coach stop having anything to say?

#1Assassin
07-11-2010, 06:19 AM
mistakes? so how long from when you started boxing till when you stopped making any mistakes? When did your coach stop having anything to say?

u know what i meant :rolleyes:

not small mistakes as in misjudging distance or missing a punch, everyone makes those mistakes. im talking about mistakes in the entire way u train. within maybe 8 months i could shadowbox, hit the bags etc without someone looking over my shoulder and still improve rather than just build bad habits.

by then i had my stance and the basics down. i kept my hands up, my chin down, elbows tucked, knees bent, stayed on the balls on my feet, didnt square up or telegraph my punches etc.

when i started i didnt do none of that right and if someone wasnt there to constantly remind me i would have made it instinct, in other words taught myself the wrong thing which would later take ten times the effort to fix.

so i would be doing nothing but hurting my progress, today i still do minor mistakes but they dont make me pick up bad habits.

Spartacus Sully
07-11-2010, 09:26 AM
u know what i meant :rolleyes:

not small mistakes as in misjudging distance or missing a punch, everyone makes those mistakes. im talking about mistakes in the entire way u train. within maybe 8 months i could shadowbox, hit the bags etc without someone looking over my shoulder and still improve rather than just build bad habits.

by then i had my stance and the basics down. i kept my hands up, my chin down, elbows tucked, knees bent, stayed on the balls on my feet, didnt square up or telegraph my punches etc.

when i started i didnt do none of that right and if someone wasnt there to constantly remind me i would have made it instinct, in other words taught myself the wrong thing which would later take ten times the effort to fix.

so i would be doing nothing but hurting my progress, today i still do minor mistakes but they dont make me pick up bad habits.

so my point is that it took you 8 months as opposed to the year that you estimated it would take some one that was doing absolutely everything wrong. and im sure you worked very hard to get all that down in 8 months while im sure some people are still working on it after a year even with out creating tons of bad habits.

as far as repeating the mistakes and doing them out of instinct this is the point of educating your self in everything that you can allways recording your self on video camera so you can critique everything you do and constantly work on it. some one that works hard teaches them self what to do and constantly critiques them self im sure could cut the 8 months in half if not alll the way down to a month where as someone thats doing absolutely everything wrong is only looking at a year instead of 8 months.

Yael The Great
07-11-2010, 10:32 AM
so my point is that it took you 8 months as opposed to the year that you estimated it would take some one that was doing absolutely everything wrong. and im sure you worked very hard to get all that down in 8 months while im sure some people are still working on it after a year even with out creating tons of bad habits.

as far as repeating the mistakes and doing them out of instinct this is the point of educating your self in everything that you can allways recording your self on video camera so you can critique everything you do and constantly work on it. some one that works hard teaches them self what to do and constantly critiques them self im sure could cut the 8 months in half if not alll the way down to a month where as someone thats doing absolutely everything wrong is only looking at a year instead of 8 months.

What is the point of video taping and then critiqing your self when he obviously not a trainer and does not now what should and shpuld not look right. Instead of telling him to buy equipment he will misuse, just tell him to do roadwork, get in shape, and when you move to Florida you will be in good shape and ready for boxing training. There has never been a good or succesfull boxer that taught himself.

Spartacus Sully
07-11-2010, 12:28 PM
What is the point of video taping and then critiqing your self when he obviously not a trainer and does not now what should and shpuld not look right. Instead of telling him to buy equipment he will misuse, just tell him to do roadwork, get in shape, and when you move to Florida you will be in good shape and ready for boxing training. There has never been a good or succesfull boxer that taught himself.

The training which Fitz believes in differs from training the training of the average fighter. First of all he trains himself. He takes his own advice and regulates his own work and diet.

"I'll do no more 18 or 20 mile runs" he said in his initial week's work. "I'll start off and run six or eight miles and then I'll walk back at a good nice gait. Next day I'll walk out my distance and run back. Another day I'll run a mile and walk a mile, alternating for 10 or 15 miles. Another day I'll follow the telegraph poles. I'll run at a top speed between two poles, then walk between the next two". http://www.fitzsimmons.co.nz/html/info.html

all you need is a source of information (internet) some good advice (forums) intelligence/common sense and hard work.

and plus id imagine if hes going to get into boxing he would want to get the equipment at some time.

One more round
07-12-2010, 12:05 AM
Heres a good manual from bob fitzsimmons back in 1901 so its got some really outdated stuff but its got alot of good information too.

http://books.google.com/books?id=ODYBeua_xEIC&dq=physical+culture+self+defense&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=JLDL14Fgxh&sig=GEto5ZvtF7w-lmAPdfSdGPPHZHI&hl=en&ei=FuuASvZ_qJK2B5Lr-NYK&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5#v=onepage&q&f=false

For ****s sake. 1901? Really? There is such a thing as progress.

Spartacus Sully
07-12-2010, 02:12 AM
For ****s sake. 1901? Really? There is such a thing as progress.

I think your confusing progress with change.

for a sport that took from 4000+ years to invent the jab (3000bc-1790ad) the changes over 100 years really cant be called progress at this point in time.

One more round
07-12-2010, 02:41 AM
I think your confusing progress with change.

for a sport that took from 4000+ years to invent the jab (3000bc-1790ad) the changes over 100 years really cant be called progress at this point in time.

There was no continuous organised boxing from 4000 years ago onwards. There is evidence of fighting with fists by various cultures, but no real science to it.

Boxing with rules and techniques wasn't really around until the 1700's or so. Jack broughton I think was the guy who put in the first rules which stopped things like too much wrestling and biting and groin shots etc