View Full Version : Incorporating weights into your boxing routine?


STILL_DETOX
07-03-2010, 02:15 AM
any1 do it? if so , how and what do u do

qwerty07
07-03-2010, 06:18 AM
In my opinion weights aren't good for anything. They overbulk you and slow you down. You should just do exercises that use your body as weight and resistance training. You'll look lean, fast, athletic, and won't have the extra bulk that you don't need and slows you down. Most top boxers past and present don't use weights at all.

-PANDA-
07-03-2010, 06:31 AM
yeah it actually helped me a lot in the gym with attaining more speed

if uve ever seen the jeff fenech work out video from title boxing thats pretty much what we used to do

if not basically u get two dumbells and do 6 different exercises, you perform each exercise continually for 30 seconds and then switch, after the 6 exercises (3 minutes) you take a 30 second brake and repeat

we used to do this for 6-7 rounds at the end of each gym session, usually with 5 pound dumbells but right now pandas using 10 pound dumbells but only doing 3 rounds cuz im out of shape :D

karategan
07-03-2010, 11:47 AM
I like to do my lifting routine in the morning and boxing at night.

Uhh, this is a weightlifting advice topic right? If so...

Strength training with full body workouts is the key. Most routines will have you lifting 3-4x a week. Not those common bodybuilder-type workouts where you work some body parts everyday. This is a great routine for starting out (and info on it and the exercises).

forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=998224

Do that 3 days a week (non-consecutive days). They are great functional lifts especially the squat and deadlift for they can help build explosiveness.

As for getting bulky and slowing down, that's false information. You get bigger from eating a calorie surplus, not from weightlifting. And even if you do get bigger muscles, it won't affect you if you're doing proper strength training.

What routines like the above do is build your muscles as you get stronger. With routines like bodybuilding, it activates "sarcoplasmic hypertrophy" which makes your muscles grow larger without an equal emount of strength gains. Specific strength training routines give you the strength that allows your body to carry around the added weight so it won't make a difference. Not sure if I explained the hypertrophy part right, but I know for sure that you won't be slowed down from weightlifting.

If you weren't even asking for advice... Well, I'll save this post for future references heh.

Righthandbanger
07-03-2010, 04:36 PM
In my opinion weights aren't good for anything. They overbulk you and slow you down. You should just do exercises that use your body as weight and resistance training. You'll look lean, fast, athletic, and won't have the extra bulk that you don't need and slows you down. Most top boxers past and present don't use weights at all.

your opinion is clearly not based on fact.

I say this again and again. strength training doesn't make you any bigger unless you are eating too many calories.

strength training does not make you slow or stiff or inflexible.

bodyweight training is still weight training.. the key is in the name.

two sites, all you will need:

http://www.rossboxing.com

http://www.stronglifts.com

that is all you need to know to make yourself stronger, more powerful and better conditioned in boxing.

STILL_DETOX
07-03-2010, 05:02 PM
thanks a lot everyone

green K given to every1

dreaded_FIST
07-03-2010, 05:08 PM
In my opinion weights aren't good for anything. They overbulk you and slow you down. You should just do exercises that use your body as weight and resistance training. You'll look lean, fast, athletic, and won't have the extra bulk that you don't need and slows you down. Most top boxers past and present don't use weights at all.

Disagree with this.

Squats, bench press, and deadlifts aka the big three..can easily improve your overall strength and explosiveness. These are compound lifts...which work your whole body as opposed to isolation exercises which only work one or two specific muscle groups, which is what most bodybuilders do to attain aesthetics.

With that said, it all comes down to your diet and how much weight you are actually lifting. You may think that weightlifting bulks you up because you think that weightlifting= big bodybuilder. But that's only because they train DIFFERENTLY. They aren't training for muscle endurance..they train for mass and strength.. and if they arent natural, the use of steroids is very common.

my .02cents

Jack3d
07-03-2010, 07:16 PM
In my opinion weights aren't good for anything. They overbulk you and slow you down. You should just do exercises that use your body as weight and resistance training. You'll look lean, fast, athletic, and won't have the extra bulk that you don't need and slows you down. Most top boxers past and present don't use weights at all.

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To answer your question, OP. Weights can be thrown into your boxing routine, but that aren't exactly a necessity, but if you train with weight the right way, they can be very beneficial. Compound Lifts and Olympic Lifts would be a great addition to a boxers training routine.

SBleeder
07-04-2010, 10:03 AM
I don't know when I could fit lifting in between sparring and other training. IMO not necessary and I'd just skip it.

Danny Gunz
07-04-2010, 06:20 PM
In my opinion weights aren't good for anything. They overbulk you and slow you down. You should just do exercises that use your body as weight and resistance training. You'll look lean, fast, athletic, and won't have the extra bulk that you don't need and slows you down. Most top boxers past and present don't use weights at all.

Do not spread those myths on this forum

BrooklynBomber
07-04-2010, 06:23 PM
I gave qwerty bad karma, because clearly his opinion is wrong. We got generations of boxers who worked one form or weight training or another to prove it.

Trick
07-05-2010, 02:28 AM
Personally I weight-train 3 days a week, but as others said, it's not a typical bodybuilder's workout. That said, I do kind of emphasize either core/hips, shoulders, or back each of those 3 days. For the most part though I try to do compound movements. You're not going to concentration curl your way out of trouble in the ring.

Depending on how you train though I wouldn't say you really have too though, just what works for me.

P.S. People who say- weights: bad, bodyweight exercises: good- depress me...

EDIT: Also, try to use free-weights whenever possible

Spartacus Sully
07-05-2010, 04:20 AM
Weights suck unless your intelligent and know how to use them.

weights make you bulk up. well they do and they dont. if your only lifting for strength doing low reps and high weight you might not bulk up supposing your an idiot on a low carb diet who never plans on running more then 5 miles at one time because you have **** stamina because you have **** carb storage then no they arnt going to make you bulk up but for the rest of us who like the boxers of the past eat healthy hearty meals to fill us up help us recover and give us energy where going to bulk up like arnold.

mean while theres the slightly more intelligent people who only use weights for high reps and low weights....theres no way to get bigger like this. you could eat a truck load of protien every day and you wouldnt build much muscle like this. you just train the muslce for endurance helping it break down lactacid acid, using oxygen more efficiently, and re process atp more quickly, but its not going to make you stronger really.

finally you have the really smart people who combine the low rep high weight exercises and the high rep low weight exercises to work the same muscle allowing them to eat as much as they want with out bulking, get stronger, increase speed, and build endurance.

but none of this should be done like those mma retards. you should lift weights for the result you want exercises are 1000 times more useful in this manner and should never be done in a 3 mins here 3 mins here 3 min here ect like fashion.

the only time you should ever ever ever train like 3 mins here 3 mins here 3 mins here is when your doing the actual sport, things like shadow boxing, when your hitting the pads, on the double end bag, on the speed bag, the heavy bag or sparring.

alza1988
07-05-2010, 05:28 AM
I don't use weight .I could be taking some off this article tho and working on some compound movements .Squats benchpress , clean and press etc
http://www.rosstraining.com/articles/strengthtraining.html

karategan
07-05-2010, 01:18 PM
weights make you bulk up. well they do and they dont. if your only lifting for strength doing low reps and high weight you might not bulk up supposing your an idiot on a low carb diet who never plans on running more then 5 miles at one time because you have **** stamina because you have **** carb storage then no they arnt going to make you bulk up but for the rest of us who like the boxers of the past eat healthy hearty meals to fill us up help us recover and give us energy where going to bulk up like arnold.

No, that is false. A calorie surplus is what gains muscle mass. Plus, low reps high weight promotes strength over muscle mass. Even if you do gain muscle, it won't affect you for since this protocol promotes strength over muscle mass, the strength will adapt to the added weight from the muscle.

mean while theres the slightly more intelligent people who only use weights for high reps and low weights....theres no way to get bigger like this. you could eat a truck load of protien every day and you wouldnt build much muscle like this. you just train the muslce for endurance helping it break down lactacid acid, using oxygen more efficiently, and re process atp more quickly, but its not going to make you stronger really.

Actually, this type of protocol is what promotes muscle mass gains over strength. The added volume from the extra repetitions causes sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. If you don't know what that is, it "involves the growth of the sarcoplasm (fluid like substance) and non-contractile proteins that do not directly contribute to muscular force production. Filament area density decreases while cross-sectional area increases, without a significant increase in strength."

finally you have the really smart people who combine the low rep high weight exercises and the high rep low weight exercises to work the same muscle allowing them to eat as much as they want with out bulking, get stronger, increase speed, and build endurance.

I don't even know what you mean by this

but none of this should be done like those mma retards. you should lift weights for the result you want exercises are 1000 times more useful in this manner and should never be done in a 3 mins here 3 mins here 3 min here ect like fashion.

I don't do that type of training but I am offended, aha. But that's for a different discussion.

Spartacus Sully
07-06-2010, 12:17 AM
No, that is false. A calorie surplus is what gains muscle mass. Plus, low reps high weight promotes strength over muscle mass. Even if you do gain muscle, it won't affect you for since this protocol promotes strength over muscle mass, the strength will adapt to the added weight from the muscle.


and a calorie surplus is also what gives you stamina to do a 10 mile run on the weekend. what do you think happens when you combine the two?

A calorie surplus is what gains muscle mass.

I agree.

Actually, this type of protocol is what promotes muscle mass gains over strength. The added volume from the extra repetitions causes sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. If you don't know what that is, it "involves the growth of the sarcoplasm (fluid like substance) and non-contractile proteins that do not directly contribute to muscular force production. Filament area density decreases while cross-sectional area increases, without a significant increase in strength."

no hypertrophy and how ever its done occurs at something like 8-12 rep 3 sets at 60-80% 1 rep max with a min break/stretch in between each set. while low weight and high reps would not be average reps like 8-12 other wise i would have said average and not high... so high reps low weight would be something like 40-60 reps of 4-6 sets at 20-30% 1 rep max with a min break/stretch between each set performed at about 1 movement per second is great for improving speed and something like 30-40 reps of 2-4 sets of 30-50% 1 rep max with min break/stretch between sets is great for endurance.




I don't even know what you mean by this

perhaps combining something like 3 sets of 1 rep max with 6 sets of speed then another 3 sets at one rep max. go do another exercise and come back to do another 3 sets at 1 rep max and 4 sets of endurance then 3 sets of 1 rep max.




I don't do that type of training but I am offended, aha. But that's for a different discussion.

oh well.

karategan
07-06-2010, 11:51 AM
and a calorie surplus is also what gives you stamina to do a 10 mile run on the weekend. what do you think happens when you combine the two?

A calorie surplus wouldn't make that much of a difference for your stamina. Just eat good meals and you're good to go. Doesn't require a surplus. Plus if you're on a surplus, you're gonna gain weight and muscle mass if you do any type of resistance training (just some rep schemes build muscle more than others). And like I said, it won't affect you if you have the strength to match it.

no hypertrophy and how ever its done occurs at something like 8-12 rep 3 sets at 60-80% 1 rep max with a min break/stretch in between each set. while low weight and high reps would not be average reps like 8-12 other wise i would have said average and not high... so high reps low weight would be something like 40-60 reps of 4-6 sets at 20-30% 1 rep max with a min break/stretch between each set performed at about 1 movement per second is great for improving speed and something like 30-40 reps of 2-4 sets of 30-50% 1 rep max with min break/stretch between sets is great for endurance.

Guess it was a just a misunderstanding, heh. But yeah it doesn't activate hypertrophy nearly as much but it still does for it's still volume. So if you do gain muscle, you won't have the strength to match it and it may slow you down. Just a real tiny bit maybe.

perhaps combining something like 3 sets of 1 rep max with 6 sets of speed then another 3 sets at one rep max. go do another exercise and come back to do another 3 sets at 1 rep max and 4 sets of endurance then 3 sets of 1 rep max.

No, it's best to do two types of training in different sessions, not in the same one especially if you're doing strength seys. The super high rep sets will affect your strength on your strength sets, and the strength sets will affect your endurance on the super high rep sets so you won't be getting the maximum benefits from both of them. It's just like if you want to work maximum explosiveness, you don't mix in sprints with long distance.

Spartacus Sully
07-06-2010, 12:27 PM
No, it's best to do two types of training in different sessions, not in the same one especially if you're doing strength seys. The super high rep sets will affect your strength on your strength sets, and the strength sets will affect your endurance on the super high rep sets so you won't be getting the maximum benefits from both of them. It's just like if you want to work maximum explosiveness, you don't mix in sprints with long distance.

oftenly i do and it really does help. the the maximum explosiveness can be worked with any weight but more so the high weight low rep greatly improves your ability to use all the fibers at once and the low weight high rep exercises help to train the slow twitch fibers for maximum endurance and to almost train them to work at close to the same speeds as your fast twitch.

though really are you having trouble holding the gloves up? what do you need more strength for?

and if you did want to gain strength and mass you can mess around with the 3 -5 rep with 80-95% 1 rep max but im not to familiar with that area as i havnt looked into it and have no problem keeping my hands up.

karategan
07-06-2010, 02:00 PM
oftenly i do and it really does help. the the maximum explosiveness can be worked with any weight but more so the high weight low rep greatly improves your ability to use all the fibers at once and the low weight high rep exercises help to train the slow twitch fibers for maximum endurance and to almost train them to work at close to the same speeds as your fast twitch.

though really are you having trouble holding the gloves up? what do you need more strength for?

Hmm, well I guess it's fine if it works for you. I still strongly state to do them on separate days so you can focus on them one at a time.

As for the strength, I was simply correcting you when you said low reps high weight bulks you up big.

Spartacus Sully
07-06-2010, 03:24 PM
Hmm, well I guess it's fine if it works for you. I still strongly state to do them on separate days so you can focus on them one at a time.



eh fine i mean your still mixing it up at most though i would agree that neither way is better then the other.

Righthandbanger
07-09-2010, 03:59 PM
strength training and conditioning training should be done separately or they both undermine each other.

Red_Kyubi
07-10-2010, 02:36 AM
I lift only once or twice a week. Very low weight with alot of reps. Dont want to get to bulky. If you do it right you will gain strength without gaining mass. Just watch calorie intake. Your muscles grow the more calories you intake.