View Full Version : who is britains youngest world champ?


amir khan
06-27-2009, 06:55 AM
?????????????????

mickey malone
06-27-2009, 01:08 PM
?????????????????
Naseem Hamed..

Leakbeak
06-27-2009, 02:42 PM
Ted 'Kid' Lewis. I think he was 20 years and 8 months when he became world champion. HRH Prince Naseem Hamed has the post war record of 21 years and several months which isn't too far behind. They both hold these records because they were the most naturally talented fighters to ever come from them shores. I'm gutted that Naz lost the hunger so young, and regret giving him that packet of baklava.

Southpaw16BF
06-27-2009, 02:51 PM
Teddy Baldock..............at 19 years 347 days old he would win the Bantamweight Title beating Archie Bell in 1927. Do there is some confussion regarding his Title win. ''Three months before, Charley "Phil" Rosenberg had forfeited the Undisputed World Title by appearing in a title bout overweight. By virtue of this bout with Bell, Baldock was declared the World Champ by the British boxing authorities. (Bell would later face Pete Sanstol for another version of the bantam crown''

But on record it is regarded as a Bantamweight Title fight which would make him the youngest World Champion out of Great Britian.

Southpaw16BF
06-27-2009, 02:52 PM
http://www.cyberboxingzone.com/images/baldoc-terry-88.jpg
It is unlikely that any London boxer has enjoyed a larger following than did the popular East Ender, Teddy Baldock. Whenever he fought coach-loads of supporters left Poplar to cheer him. When he met Archie Bell at the Albert Hall on 5 May, 1927, no less than 52 crowded charabancs chugged out of the East End, heading for Kensington like an Army convoy. Despite his popularity, Baldock's story is one which portrays the highs and lows of boxing. A world champion at the age of 19, he was burned out by the time he was 24. Despite earning big money in the ring, he died penniless at the age of 63.

Born at Poplar on 24 May, 1907, and actually christened Alfred, Teddy Baldock was destined to become a fighter. His grandfather, Jack Baldock, had been a tough bare-knuckle battler, while another scrapping relative, "Hoppy” Baldock, had been a second to many top pugilists of his day, including Charlie Mitchell, Jem Smith, and Ted Pritchard. His father, Ted, had fought at Wonderland and in the fairgrounds, and it was he who started his son boxing when the lad was just a boy. Apart from taking his son to Premierland and other East End halls, Ted used to get down on his knees in the kitchen of their little terraced house and encourage the youngster to punch away at him

At school, the young Baldock was good at football, athletics, and swimming, but it was boxing at which he excelled. He soon joined a local Boys' Club, and many of his early fights were at the St Michael's Church Hall in Poplar, against local lads. When Teddy kept winning, opponents had to he brought in from further a field. When he won an East End Boys' Clubs' five-stone championship, Teddy was presented with a medal, the first of many amateur trophies he would win.

Much of Teddy's time was taken up in working with his father, who operated as a street bookmaker. After winning one particular fight, the youngster's reward was a bicycle, which helped to get him around the streets of Poplar to collect betting slips and cash, which he then took to his father at a pre-arranged pub just before the first race each day.

Teddy had his first paid contest at the age of thirteen. He beat Young Harry Makepeace from Custom House on points, over six rounds at Barking, in 1921. He was paid seven shillings and sixpence, and it was the start of an unbeaten run, which would extend to 41 fights over more than five years.

As a teenager, Teddy was a real handful. He went to Epsom Racing Stables and became an apprentice jockey, but he was sacked after a fight with a stable-lad who wanted to sort him out. When Teddy later ran away from home, his father decided that firm discipline was needed if he was to progress as a boxer. So he took Teddy along to Joe Morris, the match-maker at Premierland, who managed former British feather weight champion Mike Honeyman.

It proved to be a smart move, because although eleven years his elder, Honeyman soon got to like Teddy. They trained together in a loft above a banana-drying shed at Dewsbury Street in Poplar, and Baldock soon became a regular performer at Premierland. He often boxed on the same shows as Honeyman, and Mike worked in his corner whenever he could

One of Teddy's early fights was against fellow-East Ender Young Riley, who came in a stone the heavier. It made no difference, however, because the Poplar boy's speed won him the decision. It was only Teddy's tenth paid engagement, but his potential was clear to see.

Speed was undoubtedly one of Baldock's main assets, but nevertheless he was astonished one day to find himself billed as "The Mumtaz Mahal of the Ring". The Premierland promoter had, in fact, named him after a very fast two-year-old race¬horse owned by the Aga Khan! The Poplar boy was certainly catching the eye of many followers of boxing, and after he had knocked out Young Bowler (Bethnal Green), in his fifteenth paid fight on 24 January, 1924, the weekly magazine Boxing carried the following comment:

"Teddy Baldock pleased us very much by his workmanlike dispatch of Young Bowler in a minute and a half. This kid will be a star performer before long, believe us! He is speedy, accurate, and ever ready to flash out with either hand, and he weighs as yet little over seven stone."

Baldock improved with every outing, and in 1924 he outpointed Young Bill Lewis (Bethnal Green), at Premierland over ten and fifteen rounds, in February and July respectively. In between those contests he drew with Kid Socks (Bethnal Green), at the National Sporting Club. Socks was, in fact, the first man to match Teddy in every department, and at the end the Poplar boy was convinced he had lost. Afterwards, he admitted that he had learned more from Socks than from any other opponent

Baldock's winning run continued through 1924 and 1925. His victims included good men, such as Billy "Kid" Hughes (Maesteg), Vic Wakefield (Manchester), Ernie Jarvis (Millwall). Johnny Haydn (Tonypandy), Frankie Ash (Plymouth), and Tiny Smith (Sheffield). All were at Premierland. Against Ash and Smith there were packed houses. When he faced Jarvis, it was Teddy's first fight over fifteen three-minute rounds, despite his age being only 18! In 1925, Teddy took on Jack Lakey as his trainer, and as his progress continued he attracted the attention of the former Wonderland owner Harry Jacobs, who was now promoting at the Royal Albert Hall. He made an offer of £1,000 for Baldock to meet British and European flyweight champion Elky Clark, but Joe Morris refused, saying: "I'm nursing this kid along, and I'm content with the small-hall money he gets in the East End until he has fully matured." Jacobs, however, was not a man to give up. His persistence was eventually rewarded when he matched Teddy with Antoine Merlo, of France, at the Albert Hall in December, 1925. Baldock won a stirring contest on points, and arrived home to a hero's welcome from crowds who lined his street.

Delighted with his performance, Jacobs promptly booked him for a series of fights with a view to matching him, eventually, with Elky Clark. Although Teddy outpointed Frankie Ash in a return over fifteen rounds, the meeting with Clark never materialised, due to the champion's illness. Instead, Teddy was paired with Alf Barber of Brighton, and the Albert Hall was packed to capacity. Although many people believed Barber would be the man to halt Baldock's winning run, the Poplar man hammered out a brilliant fifth round stoppage victory. The interest in Baldock was incredible, and again the streets of Poplar were crowded with cheering fans when he arrived home. Hundreds of late-night papers were sold at around midnight to those enthusiasts who were anxious to get the result of the fight from the Stop Press column.

Just six weeks later, Teddy faced the hard-hitting French champion, Francois Moracchini, and again many fans thought Joe Morris had allowed his charge to be overmatched. It was a terrific fight, and there were several rounds of non-stop, toe-to-toe punching. The Frenchman, who was down in the twelfth, attacked throughout, and although Baldock got the decision, it was mighty close.

Southpaw16BF
06-27-2009, 02:53 PM
In 1926, Teddy was forced to move up to bantamweight, and he had the urge to try his luck in America. His father was against the idea, but after several rows, it was arranged for him to accompany Ted Broadribb and a party including Jack Hood and Alf Mancini. Ironically, it was on the eve of his departure for the United States that Teddy suffered his first defeat. In what was his 42nd paid fight, he faced Kid Nicholson from Leeds, against the wishes of Joe Morris, but did so because he wanted some money for the American trip. Baldock had trouble making the weight, and his only success during the fight was with shots to the body. After several warnings, however, he strayed low once too often, and was disqualified in the ninth round.

The American trip was a tremendous success, and during his four-month stay Teddy had twelve contests, winning eleven and drawing the other. His greatest success was a first-round knockout of the bant¬amweight champion of Canada, Arthur de Champlaine. The fans raved over the lad from Poplar, and top promoter Tex Rickard admitted that had Baldock been old enough he would have given him the chance to fight for the vacant world bantamweight title. Baldock, Hood, and Mancini were paid good money in the States, and clubbed together to buy a car for $95. They were anxious to see the big names in action, and even drove to Philadelphia to watch Jack Dempsey training for his heavyweight title defence against Gene Tunney. They stayed there for several days, and managed to get tickets to see the fight.

When he returned to England, Teddy received a tremendous welcome, and was honoured at a dinner at a Holborn rest¬aurant by 250 admirers. While he was away, the International Sports Syndicate was formed, and took over from Harry Jacobs in promoting at the Albert Hall An offer of £1,000 had been made for Baldock to have three fights, one of which would be for the world bantamweight title, Teddy accepted the offer, and in his first contest for the new promoters he knocked out Young Johnny Brown of St. George's in three rounds. After the fight, he was asked to return to the ringside because the Prince of Wales wanted to shake his hand. Teddy was terrified, and he refused, and literally had to be dragged from the dressing-room to meet his royal admirer.

After Baldock knocked out the German Felix Friedmann, the promoters cabled American Archie Bell with an offer of £1,000 for him to meet the Londoner for the vacant world bantamweight title. Bell, a veteran of over 60 fights agreed. He travelled to London, and trained at "The Black Bull" at Whetstone. Baldock set up his training camp at Hurstpierpoint, with former British featherweight champion Johnny Curley as his chief sparring-partner Baldock had a tremendous following, and on the evening of the fight 52 charabancs, crammed with enthusiastic fans, set off from Poplar for the Royal Albert Hall. The great arena was packed to capacity, and the atmosphere was electric. The American was by far the best man Baldock had faced, and the contest was fought at a terrific pace from start to finish. It was a toe-to-toe battle, and one of the greatest ever seen in a London ring. Teddy boxed brilliantly, and with just two rounds to go he was well ahead. Suddenly, Bell launched a whirlwind attack in an effort to turn the fight around. It was at this stage that the East Ender's speed, skill, and ability to absorb a punch were decisive, and he weathered the storm to take the decision. The crowd were delirious, and at the end the organist played "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow".

The whole of Poplar celebrated, and at a civic reception a few days later, Teddy was presented with an illuminated address signed by the Mayor of Poplar, and was awarded the Freedom of the Borough.

Despite his wonderful achievement, Baldock was never officially recognised as world champion, because the contest was not held at the premises of the autocratic National Sporting Club. The British Boxing Board of Control, in its present structure, had not yet been formed, and boxing was controlled by the NSC. But Teddy's lack of recognition was not a problem to the great showman Charles B. Cochran, who, seven weeks later, paid him €750 to fight featherweight champion Johnny Cuthbert over six rounds at Olympia. The bout was a support to the Mickey Walker-Tommy Milligan world middleweight title fight, and the result was a draw, Baldock's purse was, nevertheless, a record for a six-rounder.

Five months after beating Bell, Teddy defended his world title against Willie Smith of South Africa, but was soundly outpointed. Down in the eighth, he did well to survive the distance. Despite challenging the South African to a return, with a side-stake of €1,000, Baldock did not get the chance to regain his laurels.

Although he eased back with wins over Len Fowler and Phil Lolosky. Teddy was not the same fighter. The flashing left hand, which had won him most of his fights in the past, was now giving him trouble. He damaged it when knocking out Fowler, but after a real war with Lolosky, further damage put him out of action for five months. When he did return to the ring in July, 1928, Teddy knocked out Pierre Calloir of France in four rounds, and three weeks later stopped Bugler Harry Lake in five rounds, before a crowd of 8,000 at Blackpool Race Course, amid pouring rain.

Joe Morris, meanwhile, was planning a big show at the Clapton Orient Football Ground, with British flyweight champion Johnny Hill topping the bill against the American Newsboy Brown. In the chief supporting contest he matched Baldock with Johnny Brown, the St. George's bantam, for the national eight stone-six title. Before a crowd of 30,000, Baldock hit Brown at will before the corner threw in the towel during the second round. Despite his claim to the British title, Teddy was yet again not recognised as champion, because the fight had not been staged at the National Sporting Club. It was further claimed that Brown had, in fact, forfeited the title because almost three years had elapsed since he last defended it. The Club therefore recognised Alf "Kid" Pattenden as champion, following his victory over George "Kid" Nicholson in June, I928.

Although he was disappointed, Baldock continued along his winning way by stopping Mick Hill (Tooting), at "The Ring", Blackfriars, and three weeks later he met Phil Lolosky in an eagerly-awaited return at the Albert Hall. Although he knocked out Lolosky in three rounds, Teddy again badly damaged his left hand. He was examined by a Harley Street specialist, who diagnosed a fracture of the left metacarpal in three places. An operation was carried out, and Teddy was out of the ring for a further five months. Meanwhile, intense rivalry had built up in the East End between fans of Baldock and those of Alf Pattenden, of Bethnal Green. Both men claimed the British bantamweight title, and the matter was in urgent need of settlement. It was, in fact, shortly after the formation of the British Boxing Board of Control, in 1929, that the two men were matched for the undisputed championship.

The fight took place at Olympia on 16 May, 1929, with a Lonsdale Belt at stake. It was later described as one of the greatest battles ever seen in a British ring. For round after round, the two little men pounded each other, with neither prepared to give way, Pattenden was hit with hooks, uppercuts, and jabs from both hands, and smashes to the chin which would have floored many bigger men. His face cut and smeared with blood, Alf was made of steel, and came back time and again. It was amazing that the fight went the distance, and at the final bell the pair fell into each other's arms. They had given everything, and although each man was only 22, there can be no doubt that this fight finished both of them. Baldock got the decision, but the cheering of the crowd, which lasted for several minutes, was for both men. Afterwards, Teddy described Alf as boxing's gamest loser
...................

Southpaw16BF
06-27-2009, 02:54 PM
After two months' rest, Baldock faced Gideon Potteau of Belgium at the Blackpool Football Ground, during August Bank Holiday weekend, before a crowd of over 10,000 When he scored a knockdown in the opening round, Teddy looked set for an early night, but then the effects of the very hard Pattenden fight were clear. Baldock struggled, and it was the eleventh round before the Belgian surrendered.

Meanwhile, Teddy received an offer from America of €2,000, or 17.5 % of the gate receipts, to meet "Panama" Al Brown, for the world title. (This boxer was known in the States by his prefix because another Al Brown was campaigning in the USA at the same time, but in Britain and in Europe the national designation was rarely used.) The fight was set for 17 September, 1929, and Baldock and his party travelled to the States and commenced training. The occasion was then postponed for two weeks, because Brown wasn't ready. Then, with just a few days to go, the lean and lanky black Panamanian asked for another postponement owing to stomach problems. Teddy was continually being messed around, and in the end his patience was exhausted and he returned home.

He was back in action in January, 1930, and beat Emile Pladner of France, who was disqualified in the sixth for a terrible low blow, which left the Poplar boy rolling in agony on the floor. Good victories over Charlie Rowbotham (rsf 11), Lew Pinkus, (points), and Jimmy Docherty (KO 6), followed, but although Teddy had won fourteen in a row, the fights were getting fewer. There were further negotiations for him to meet "Panama" Al Brown, but these fell through when Joe Morris insisted on getting €500 appearance money up front, Clear evidence that Baldock was declining came when he dropped a points decision to Benny Sharkey at Newcastle in September, 1930 Apart from problems with his hands, he was also having difficulty making the bantamweight limit.

Although he agreed to meet Alf Pattenden in a return bout at "The Ring", it was a non-title affair at eight stone twelve pounds. The fight took place on a Sunday afternoon (7 December), and there was not an inch of space to be had in that nostalgic Blackfriars arena. The fans were treated to another stirring contest, but it was never as exciting as their first encounter, because both were effectively washed up. Nevertheless, Baldock won a good fifteen-round decision.

Believing he still had plenty left, Teddy gave up the British bantamweight crown and issued a challenge to featherweight champion Johnny Cuthbert of Sheffield. Although the Board of Control approved the contest, the National Sporting Club officials were keen to match the Poplar man with "Panama" Al Brown. After a great deal of negotiation, the Central American agreed to fight in London, but on condition that it was a non-title affair at nine stone. Brown was a Fine boxer, and a veteran of almost 100 engagements, and several British fighters had failed to beat him. Kid Socks, who in 1924 had given Baldock a great deal of trouble, was knocked out in five by Brown in 1927, while Alf Pattenden (drew 15), Johnny Cuthbert (drew 15), and Harry Corbett (lost on points over 10 and 12 rounds), also failed to beat him. When he came to London to face Baldock, Al had lost just once in his last 48 contests. Teddy, however, was unperturbed, and was so confident of victory that he put up a side-stake of €250.

After warming up with victories over Gideon Potteau (KO 2), and Terence Morgan (points), Baldock faced Brown at Olympia on 21 May, 193I. Incidentally, the Panamanian was one of the all-time freaks of the ring. Although always able to make eight and a half stone, he stood only an inch under six feet. His tremendous reach was decisive throughout the first ten rounds, and he held a wide points lead. Realising that he had to do something special, Teddy threw caution to the wind and went out for a do-or-die battle. It was a fatal mistake, because Brown was a class fighter, and simply stepped up a gear. In the twelfth round, he floored Baldock for counts of eight, eight again, nine, and three before the fight was stopped. At the age of 24, Teddy Baldock was a spent fighter. He had just one more contest, and faced fellow-East Ender Dick Corbett at Clapton on 7 September, 1931.

During the first round, Teddy's left hand swelled up badly, and the right, which he had previously broken and which had never properly set, also became extremely painful. Corbett won easily on points, and with increasing eye trouble as well, Baldock knew he could never fight again. When he quit the ring, he did so with great dignity, and his fine record of just five defeats from 80 contests is a testimony of his fighting qualities. "Panama" Al Brown was the only man ever to stop him. Teddy remained a hero in Poplar and when he got married in 1931, the crowds were so dense that traffic in the area stopped for more than half an hour. People climbed lamp-posts and stood on roof-tops trying to get a glimpse of him and his bride. The reception was held in the fashionable Guildhall, and the wedding cake, in the shape of a boxing ring, was a work of art.

When he retired from the ring. Teddy had no trade to fall back on, so he turned to street bookmaking, which he learned with his father. Sadly, he soon got in with the wrong crowd, and lost as much as €100 a day gambling on the horses and dogs, 'Apart from the gambling, he was drinking heavily, and it wasn't long before his marriage broke up. He did have one stroke of luck in 1937, when a stable-lad at Epsom told him to back the appropriately-named entry Punch, in the Caesarewitch. The horse won at 50-1, and although Teddy picked up €5,000, the money soon disappeared on other "sure things", which were beaten. Apart from being a reckless gambler, Teddy Baldock was a man of great generosity. He did many people favours, but lost thousands of pounds to spongers who he thought were his friends. Many loans were never repaid, and once he was broke, most of his old pals disappeared.

In the later years of his life, Teddy claimed that his bookmaking venture and personal gambling cost him more than €10,000. Money from his boxing purses, which his father had supposedly been saving for him, also disappeared, and instead of there being thousands of pounds in the bank, only a few hundred were left. Teddy used this to get a pub, and for a while he ran "The Earl of Derby" at Forest Gate. At first he did quite well, but with the arrival of the Second World War, trade dropped off badly, and he handed the place back lo the brewers. When bombs dropped on to a row of houses near to his pub, Teddy gave all his spare clothes to the homeless. A house which he owned in Barking was also destroyed, and although he received €3,000 from the War Damage Commission, the money disappeared in no time.

During the war, Teddy served with the RAF, and was posted to Scotland, where he did numerous boxing exhibitions for the troops. In peacetime, he had jobs as a physical training instructor at Butlin's, worked as a steel erector, a labourer on the docks, and a messenger in Fleet Street. As he got older, however, jobs became more difficult to come by, and the old fighter went down hill rapidly. By the mid-1950s he had declined to such an extent that he was ashamed to let his daughter see him. When he died at Rochford Infirmary in Essex on 8 March, 1971, Teddy Baldock was penniless. The man who made more than €20,000 from boxing before he was 24, when such an amount of money really meant something, who owned a dozen suits and a couple of cars, who lived in the oyster bars and plush restaurants of London's West End, had nothing. In his prime he rubbed shoulders with dukes, earls, and their ladies in posh clubs, but when he died he didn't even possess a pair of pyjamas.

During the last years of his life, Baldock owned just one shabby suit, and slept rough on the streets or in dirty common lodging-houses in the East End of London. When he passed away, not a single national newspaper recorded the fact. The man who had thrilled packed boxing arenas for almost a decade was completely forgotten. The story of Teddy Baldock is one of the sadder sides of boxing. It reveals how the hangers-on are there when a fighter is at his peak, yet vanish into the darkness when the money runs out. Modern-day champions would do well to remember the plight of "The Pride of Poplar", The funeral of the once great champion was held at Southend, and his ashes were interred in the Garden of Remembrance at Southend - on - Sea Crematorium.

I hope that this brief insight into my grandfather's life will have been of interest to anyone visiting this site. It does however only scratch the surface of his fascinating life. My Grandfather's biography Teddy Baldock - The Pride of Poplar is now available in Hardback for €16.99 incl P&P. Please request a copy of the book via this sites contact page.

............

mickey malone
06-27-2009, 03:26 PM
Ted 'Kid' Lewis. I think he was 20 years and 8 months when he became world champion. HRH Prince Naseem Hamed has the post war record of 21 years and several months which isn't too far behind. They both hold these records because they were the most naturally talented fighters to ever come from them shores. I'm gutted that Naz lost the hunger so young, and regret giving him that packet of baklava.
I was aware of this.. And he's the 1st name that came into my head..

In those days, titles were sometimes awarded on 'newspaper' decisions.. And I think this is how he got his.. I know he fought for it Vs Jack Britten on a few occasions, but I believe these were all losing efforts.. Had a lot of respect in the States though.. More so than any other British fighter I'd say.. Thanks for the info..

mickey malone
06-27-2009, 03:28 PM
Teddy Baldock..............at 19 years 347 days old he would win the Bantamweight Title beating Archie Bell in 1927. Do there is some confussion regarding his Title win.

But on record it is regarded as a Bantamweight Title fight which would make him the youngest World Champion out of Great Britian.
Good info.. New you'd come up with something.. lol

Kid McCoy
06-27-2009, 04:25 PM
I was aware of this.. And he's the 1st name that came into my head..

In those days, titles were sometimes awarded on 'newspaper' decisions.. And I think this is how he got his.. I know he fought for it Vs Jack Britten on a few occasions, but I believe these were all losing efforts.. Had a lot of respect in the States though.. More so than any other British fighter I'd say.. Thanks for the info..

Lewis's first win over Britton was a legitimate points decision, so he did actually win the title. But in some parts of America a fight which went the distance was a no decision, so essentially you had to KO the champ to win the title. Most of Lewis' fights with Britton were actually NDs, so although they fought 20+ times, the title only changed hands on a handful of occasions.

There have been a few other Brits who were well respected in the US, perhaps more than they were in Blighty. Jimmy Wilde is even now acknowledged by most as the #1 flyweight ever. Jackie Kid Berg was recognised as one of the top pound for pound fighters in the world when he went over to the States. And according to Hugh McIlvanney, some of the hacks at Madison Square Garden thought Ken Buchanan was the slickest boxer they'd seen since Ray Robinson. Praise indeed.

amir khan
06-27-2009, 04:36 PM
just testing you guys i knew, im related to him...

amir khan
06-27-2009, 05:05 PM
and dont give me all that naseem hamed ****e he was a paper champion at that age

mickey malone
06-28-2009, 06:18 AM
Lewis's first win over Britton was a legitimate points decision, so he did actually win the title. But in some parts of America a fight which went the distance was a no decision, so essentially you had to KO the champ to win the title. Most of Lewis' fights with Britton were actually NDs, so although they fought 20+ times, the title only changed hands on a handful of occasions.

There have been a few other Brits who were well respected in the US, perhaps more than they were in Blighty. Jimmy Wilde is even now acknowledged by most as the #1 flyweight ever. Jackie Kid Berg was recognised as one of the top pound for pound fighters in the world when he went over to the States. And according to Hugh McIlvanney, some of the hacks at Madison Square Garden thought Ken Buchanan was the slickest boxer they'd seen since Ray Robinson. Praise indeed.
Thanks Kid...

Just went to BoxRec for this.. You're right... Jeeeez.. How many times did they fight!!!!
I got dizzy counting! I wonder if they got burried together... UNBELIEVABLE!!
And yes... Buchanan & Berg DID win the hearts of many Americans..
Well done... Cheers.. MM

mickey malone
06-28-2009, 06:30 AM
and dont give me all that naseem hamed ****e he was a paper champion at that age
Not a chance!

I rated him 'wholesale'.. I always will.. One of my AT favorites..

But.. Please tell me... What is wrong with the guys attitude.. Please don't tell me he hasn't got a problem with attitude, cos he has...

amir khan
06-28-2009, 08:40 AM
Not a chance!

I rated him 'wholesale'.. I always will.. One of my AT favorites..

But.. Please tell me... What is wrong with the guys attitude.. Please don't tell me he hasn't got a problem with attitude, cos he has...

i meant he held a version of the title, he wasnt undisputed, like teddy

mickey malone
06-28-2009, 10:28 AM
i meant he held a version of the title, he wasnt undisputed, like teddy
Slow down, slow down...

Read what I've written...

I answered Naseem Hamed immediately.. He holds the record in the 'modern world'..
He is also everything I've said... Including the attitude problem..
As a relation of his.. I thought you could give an insight as to whether I'm wrong or not.. He's respected in boxing circles.. But NOT by the general public...
The question is about Hamed, & has nothing to do with Lewis, Sherringham, Heath or any other 'Teddy'.....

amir khan
06-28-2009, 11:09 AM
Slow down, slow down...

Read what I've written...

I answered Naseem Hamed immediately.. He holds the record in the 'modern world'..
He is also everything I've said... Including the attitude problem..
As a relation of his.. I thought you could give an insight as to whether I'm wrong or not.. He's respected in boxing circles.. But NOT by the general public...
The question is about Hamed, & has nothing to do with Lewis, Sherringham, Heath or any other 'Teddy'.....


sorry i misunderstood

mickey malone
06-28-2009, 12:16 PM
sorry i misunderstood
No probs man....

In that case.... I respect his pride & your family commitment.. Regards MM

amir khan
06-30-2009, 06:30 PM
http://www.blinkx.com/videos/teddy+baldock

i found a video, of a washed up and passed prime teddy getting knocked out for teh only time in his career by HOFer panama al brown