View Full Version : The Least physically gifted fighter


cotto16
04-20-2009, 03:53 PM
A fighter who was not physically big or strong, didnt have a great shape. Who comes to mind past and present?

portuge puncher
04-20-2009, 03:57 PM
rocky marciano was short, light, and had the smallest arms of any other heavywieght champion.

cotto16
04-20-2009, 04:04 PM
rocky marciano was short, light, and had the smallest arms of any other heavywieght champion.

But he was as strong as a mule, pound for pound he could be one of the strongest ever heavyweights

THE REED™
04-20-2009, 04:06 PM
But he was as strong as a mule, pound for pound he could be one of the strongest ever heavyweights

Shavers and Foremans power trumps Marcianos... ROcky was around 180 lbs....

Bendigo
04-20-2009, 04:13 PM
Shavers and Foremans power trumps Marcianos... ROcky was around 180 lbs....

Foreman's power was freakish and mythical in origin.

mickey malone
04-20-2009, 06:58 PM
Francisco Damiani had a rather peculiar physique.. Always looked a bit feeble..

truthseeker1
04-20-2009, 07:21 PM
A fighter who was not physically big or strong, didnt have a great shape. Who comes to mind past and present?

Smokin' Joe Frazier. Incredible fighter.

them_apples
04-20-2009, 07:24 PM
Qawi, 5'5 1/2 and fought and heavyweight


Rocky, slow as mud, lots of stamina..must have had no fast twitch fibers in his body at all.

tiny for a HW.

AztecWanker
04-20-2009, 07:39 PM
Corrie Sanders.

Knighte
04-20-2009, 10:01 PM
Jimmy Wilde!!!

Even for a flyweight he appeared tiny and feeble.. but he became one of the greatest champions of all time.

Southpaw16BF
04-20-2009, 10:04 PM
Jimmy Wilde!!!

Even for a flyweight he appeared tiny and feeble.. but he became one of the greatest champions of all time.

Jimmy Wilde was freak of nature, that often weighed below 100 pound. He was one of the hardest hitters ever, and was great at avoiding shots and was tough as they come. He is considered by many to be Britain's greatest ever fighter
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41779000/jpg/_41779610_jimmywilde_get203x300.jpg

PLATE
04-20-2009, 10:06 PM
Shavers and Foremans power trumps Marcianos... ROcky was around 180 lbs....


What part of "pound for pound" don't you understand?

Southpaw16BF
04-20-2009, 10:11 PM
Jimmy Wilde was freak of nature, that often weighed below 100 pound. He was one of the hardest hitters ever, and was great at avoiding shots and was tough as they come. He is considered by many to be Britain's greatest ever fighter
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41779000/jpg/_41779610_jimmywilde_get203x300.jpg

Here's a good article on Wilde's career.
Jimmy Wilde's Lord Lonsdale belt

Coal mines
Jimmy Wilde was born 15th May, 1892 in Quakers Yard, Merthyr Tydfil. At the age of twelve his family moved to Tylorstown, Rhondda where Jimmy began his working life in the coal mines there. Working in the coal mines built up Wilde's amazing strength for he never weighed more than 108 pounds for any of his fights (his usual weight being around 100 pounds - he never made 8 stone in his boxing career). His physical appearance was extremely deceptive, although so small, pale and frail looking Jimmy Wilde possessed immense courage, blindingly fast hands, knowledge of his chosen art, a punch that many feather/lightweights would envy and perfect timing -using his opponents momentum against them. Pound for pound he is undisputedly one of the most devastating punchers ever to grace a boxing ring, the greatest flyweight of all time and quite possibly the greatest fighter of all time.

Boxing booths
At the age of 16 Jimmy began fighting in boxing booths. It is estimated that he fought anywhere in the region of between 500 - 1000 fights when including the bouts he engaged in during these boxing booth days. The booth fights would hone Jimmy's skills and begin his legendary status. For he fought hundreds of opponents, mostly all of which were several stones (1 stone = 14lbs) heavier than himself, and indeed fought as many as 25 opponents in one day!! For a day in the boxing booths Jimmy could earn the equivalent to a weeks wages in the coal mines.

Unbeaten in 101 contests
After building a fantastic reputation for himself in the boxing booths of Wales, Jimmy had his first professional contest against Les Williams in a three round no decision. He then embarked on a series of wins that would later establish him as a legend of the fight game. Notable victories - and there were many - included an eighteenth round knockout of Billy Padden to take the British 98lb championship, a 6 round K.O. of Frenchman Eugene Husson and wins over world title claimants Sid Smith and Joe Symonds (Symonds had previously beaten Percy Jones - the first Welshman to claim a world title). Wilde remained unbeaten for four years and a total of 101 fights ! (including no decisions). They came, they saw and in the vast majority of cases they were knocked out !

First defeat
Challenging for the British & European flyweight titles, in his 102nd contest, Jimmy Wilde tasted defeat for the first time after his corner threw in the towel in the 17th round against Scotland's Tancy Lee. Wilde had been ill just prior to the fight and was exhausted when his corner threw the towel in to signal the end of the contest. Afterward Jimmy instructed his corner to NEVER throw the towel in again - no matter what. Tancy Lee had stayed away from Wilde's power punches while landing his own and establishing his dominance. Jimmy did not fight for four months after this defeat, by his own standards this was an extraordinary length of time.

Once back in the ring he returned to his winning ways. 19 contests brought 19 wins before Wilde finally got Tancy Lee to face him again. There was to be no repeat win for the Scotsman as the Welsh 'Mighty Atom' scored repeatedly with devastating body punches to end the fight in eleven rounds, thereby avenging his earlier defeat and taking the British & European flyweight titles.

During the run of 19 wins Jimmy had met and beaten Joe Symonds, for the second time, by way of a 12th round K.O. At the time, 1916, Symonds was regarded in Britain as the World Flyweight Champion. Another claimant to the World flyweight title was Johnny Rosner, but he too succumbed to the power of the 'Mighty Atom' as he was defeated in eleven rounds. However, Jimmy was still not universally recognised as World Champion until later that same year.


World Title win
Jimmy Wilde's destiny was fulfilled when on 18th December 1916 he became the first officially recognised World Flyweight Champion by defeating Young Zulu Kid, of America. Zulu Kid was 3 inches shorter than Wilde and could not match his speed and power, resulting in a battering for the 11 rounds the contest lasted.

During the First World War, Jimmy Wilde served as a Sergeant Instructor fighting professionally only twice in 1917 and three times in 1918. One of these fights was against Joe Conn, who was the leading contender for the British featherweight title. Putting on a tremendous performance Jimmy ko'd his featherweight opponent in twelve rounds. His first contest after the Great War was against Joe Lynch who took a hammering for 15 rounds before Jimmy was declared the points winner. Joe Lynch later went on to beat Pete Herman to become World Bantamweight Champion.

Wilde begins to wane
Wilde went to America in 1919, and for almost a year, he toured the States beating an assortment of mainly much heavier opponents. The Americans grew to love Wilde and to this day he is revered by fight fans Stateside. Gene Tunney said of Jimmy Wilde, "He is the greatest fighter I ever saw". In 1959 Jimmy Wilde was inducted into the American Boxing Hall of Fame.

By 1921, Jimmy Wilde was 28 years old, had fought in hundreds of contests (possibly up to a thousand including booth fights) against bigger men and had held his world title for four years. Now he was to suffer only his third defeat (in 128 fights) when matched in a non-title fight against Pete Herman, who weighed in at 121 pounds to Jimmy's 108 pounds.

Herman, had lost his World Bantamweight title in his last contest. A rumour circulating was that Herman did not want to risk his title against the incomparable Welshman; but was confident of winning it back upon returning to America. Pete Herman was an accomplished, clever boxer who also packed quite a punch. The weight difference for once was a telling factor against Wilde. Although he had built up a substantial points lead by taking the fight to Herman it was obvious that Wilde was no longer the force of old, quite simply the bigger man was proving too much for Wilde in the latter rounds. Round seventeen saw Jimmy visit the canvas twice prompting the referee to step in to halt the fight.

Pete Herman, did indeed go on to regain the World Bantamweight title.

Young Jennings was beaten by Wilde for the third time the following month but now the accumulation of so many fights were taking their toll on the brilliant Welsh boxer resulting in his retirement for over 2 years.

Return to the ring
With the prospect of a big pay day (£13,000) Wilde returned to the ring in 1923 to defend his world title against Francisco Guilledo, of the Philippines - who boxed under the name of Pancho Villa. The fight took place at the Polo Grounds, New York. Jimmy Wilde was a 31 year old champion of over six years standing but was now in serious decline, about to face a 22 year old, hard punching, all action type of fighter in Villa.

The fight was over in 7 rounds with Wilde taking a fierce hammering from the youthful challenger. At the bell to end the second round Wilde dropped his arms and turned to go to his corner when Villa landed with a heavy blow to the champion's jaw. Though badly concussed Wilde came out for the third round - clearly in no fit state to continue. The Mighty Atom fought bravely on; but now the odds were insurmountable for the incomparable little Welshman. Round after round Villa punished Wilde; but Jimmy would not give up. Displaying immense courage Jimmy Wilde battled on until finally, unable to see out of either eye and with his face a bloody mess he was counted out in the seventh.

Jimmy Wilde had fought one of the greatest battles ever witnessed in a championship fight. Not surprisingly he announced his retirement from the ring after the Villa loss, only his fourth defeat in 149 contests.


The Greatest Fighter of All Time
Jimmy Wilde is a legend. 'The Ghost With A Hammer In His Hand' was inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1959; he was also inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990. In a 13 year career he lost only 4 of 149 fights. He is, without doubt, the greatest flyweight of all time. Answers to the question, 'Who is the greatest fighter of all time?' will provide many differing opinions but there is no doubt that Jimmy

Southpaw16BF
04-20-2009, 10:11 PM
http://www.johnnyowen.com/jimmy_wilde.html

Southpaw16BF
04-20-2009, 10:14 PM
Here is Wilde in action

vs Joe Symonds
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Vs Pancho Villa
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oldgringo
04-20-2009, 10:45 PM
Greg Haugen maybe?

Not terribly strong or quick of hand or foot, decent punching power but nothing special. He was only 5'6 and had few advantages over his opponents. He was determined as hell though and he worked very hard. Good counter puncher in his heyday.

American_Ninja
04-20-2009, 11:21 PM
Randal "Tex" Cobb.
No power but could take 1 helluva punch.

JAB5239
04-21-2009, 04:00 AM
Joe Walcott was less than 5'2" and ko'd Joe Choynski who in turn knocked out Jack Johnson the following year. Guy was built like a brick ****house and fought from lightweight to heavy.

mickey malone
04-21-2009, 05:17 AM
Craig Bodszenevski (spelt wrong 4 sure) CW had only 1 leg!! done alright to...

Baby Jake Matlala 1 leg much shorter than the other Fy W was honored by Nelson Mandella as the most successful South African world champ AT.... I, personally would give that accolade to Brian Mitchell, but Matlala was far more popular..

JAB5239
04-21-2009, 05:26 AM
[QUOTE=mickey malone;5114224]Craig Bodszenevski (spelt wrong 4 sure) CW had only 1 leg!! done alright to...


Didn't he fight fight for a title?

mickey malone
04-21-2009, 07:38 AM
[QUOTE]


Didn't he fight fight for a title?
Yes he did.. Went the distance to.. Lost a DC but can't remember the opp.. Will find out though... Someone like Arthur Williams or James Waring I think..

cotto16
04-21-2009, 07:43 AM
[QUOTE=JAB5239;5114241]
Yes he did.. Went the distance to.. Lost a DC but can't remember the opp.. Will find out though... Someone like Arthur Williams or James Waring I think..

try and find out dude this guy is unreal, fighting for a world title with 1 leg, he must of had alot of heart to get that far

talip bin osman
04-21-2009, 07:54 AM
hey mr. cotto16 sir...

dodie boy penalosa, gerry's brother was a flyweight champ in the 80s... he has polio...

mickey malone
04-21-2009, 07:55 AM
[QUOTE=mickey malone;5114431]

try and find out dude this guy is unreal, fighting for a world title with 1 leg, he must of had alot of heart to get that far
Job done..

Craig Bodzianowski (spelt correctly)

Record 31 4 1 23KO 188 rounds boxed

Did fight James Waring lost UD but not for title

Fought Robert Daniels (a few fights later) for title lost UD

He was some fella wasn't he?

cotto16
04-21-2009, 08:03 AM
[QUOTE=cotto16;5114446]
Job done..

Craig Bodzianowski (spelt correctly)

Record 31 4 1 23KO 188 rounds boxed

Did fight James Waring lost UD but not for title

Fought Robert Daniels (a few fights later) for title lost UD

He was some fella wasn't he?

wow, the guy was unreal talk about a big heart and never giveing up

cotto16
04-21-2009, 08:04 AM
hey mr. cotto16 sir...

dodie boy penalosa, gerry's brother was a flyweight champ in the 80s... he has polio...

must of been a tuff guy to over come that and then box

Fi5hbone
04-21-2009, 09:53 AM
Hilmer Kenty....Dude had legs the size of ball point pens...

mickey malone
04-21-2009, 11:31 AM
Tony Tubbs......

He was one of those guys who was just born fat.. If you met him in person without knowing what he did, you'd think the only thing he could open was the jam. That his favorite musical instrument was the dinner bell..
On the contrary, he could'a run 6 miles a day & would'a still looked the same.. Proof of this is testiment to his ex champion status, concurred with his many 12 rounders..
I also think he would be a fringe contender as one of the fastest heavies of all time..
Thought he deserved a mention..

mickey malone
04-21-2009, 11:39 AM
Hilmer Kenty....Dude had legs the size of ball point pens...
Vernon Forrest has legs like that too..
Remember Johnny Owen? RIP

Also.... Look how hard Lew Jenkins & Sadler hit! (They both looked like extended tripods)