View Full Version : general weight lifting question....


SugarShanep4p
07-14-2008, 11:20 PM
I know weight lifting isn't generally part of a boxing training regimen but I'v had a nerve injury in my forearms for about 8 months that I'm having surgery on next month, and I haven't been to the gym since around jan. Since I can't punch anything/anyone Iv been lifting since that doesn't seem to aggravate the pinched nerves, and I was curious about how I should be lifting. Is it ok to lift every day if im working different muscle? like can I military bench press on monday, then do bicep curls on Tuesday, or should I just be lifting every other day regardless of the muscles im working? Any advice would be much appreciated.

dfwtx
07-14-2008, 11:56 PM
Of course you're going to get alot of "boxers don't lift" comments on this thread but I think what you're suggesting is alright aslong as you are giving each muscle adequate time to recover and spacing out these exercises alot, as you have mentioned. Good luck with the nerves man.

..David..
07-15-2008, 12:08 AM
hi man, i have been in your position and i was a competitive bodybuilder so i know a little bit about weightlifting. PM if you wanna know more but here is my 2 cents.

Give your body at least one day a weak and i mean AT LEAST, recovery time its essential, i would recommend doing something like a 3 days on 1 off then 2 on and 1 off.

Some basic supplements for muscle recovery wouldnt hurt, like L-Glutamine and Gluscosamine ( note: dont take glucosamine if your family has any record or problems with diabetes ) if not you are good to go.

hope that helps :)

Landon S
07-15-2008, 02:55 AM
Dont lift weights like that are you CRAZY!:joke:

But seriously dont. A bodypart split is definitely not good for boxers, heres why:
-Athletes should train movements not individual muscles to enhance CNS. ex: skullcrushers, front raises, chest flys all work the same muscles as the benchpress but which imitates punches closer? Your muscles need to learn to exert force together not individualy.
-(this doesnt apply 100% to you since your not currently at a gym) Being sore in any muscle will screw with your skillwork and possibly cause injury (creating a weak link)
-You could do 3 fullbody workouts a week instead of hitting everything once or twice anyways.
-Bodybuilders are often bigger than they are strong, carrying around impressive looking muscles that dont do as much as they should or could. Big muscles use more oxygen too so your stamina will decrease. You can still have great stamina but not as much.

(I can only type so much b4 I need to start a new post, stupid comp)brb

Landon S
07-15-2008, 03:07 AM
Keep to lower reps (3-5) to avoid extra less functional mass (unless you want it). You can still gain mass that way but you will gain far more strength in as small a package as possible. Use compound lifts like: benchpress, squats, deadlifts, lunges, overhead press, clean & press, snatches etc. Use common sense deciding the number of sets for your workout and whatever you do avoid the bodybuilder hypertrophy zone (8-12 reps usually). Its not gonna kill ya to do it bodybuilder style but it will have minimal benefits and possibly (most likely) be detrimental to your performance.

In case you dont believe me www.sports-fitness-advisor.com/boxing-training.html

No offense david, you seem like an intelligent guy and probably know your stuff but getting mere size doesnt really help boxers. Rugby & football linemen on the other hand...

fraidycat
07-15-2008, 03:11 AM
Agreed with the above. Stay off of isolation exercises unless there is one specific muscle that you think you're weak on.

Stick with the big three: squats, cleans, and deadlifts. These will give you everything you need for boxing -- explosive power, coordination, and balance. I like to do weighted sit-ups and back levers, but that's just me. I do one day of each of the above when I'm training. Usually 1-2 days per week, and boxing training the other days, with Sundays off. So one week I'll do a day of squats and a day of power cleans, the next week maybe just one day of deadlifts, the next week a day of squats (or full cleans, but never both squats and full cleans the same week -- my knees can't handle it.) You get the idea.

Rafael Benitez
07-15-2008, 03:18 AM
Weights make you slow and they are for bums. Alot of modern techniqes are bollocks and have nothing to do with boxing. All this strenght and conditioning coach stuff is crap. Like Roger Mayweather said, most of it has nothing to do with boxing, ie. it is not sport specific training.

No old school trainer will tell you to do weights. Fat Hatton did weights and he ain't no speedy Gonzales. Alot of the all time greats stayed away from wieghts. Usually the more fluid fighters are weights free and I don't think this ia a coincidence. Ali and Jones Jr used no weights.

Talon
07-15-2008, 03:21 AM
get big and jacked and worry about coordination and endurance later

JF91
07-15-2008, 03:31 AM
get big and jacked and worry about coordination and endurance later

Being "big and jacked" doesnt mean you can pack a punch.

Landon S
07-15-2008, 03:43 AM
No old school trainer will tell you to do weights

Keyword=OLD

We dont live in caves anymore and so we do things a different way. Old school methods produce fine fighters but you can always hit harder. Also all the all-time greats trained old school because that was how that period trained, that was the only way taught so of course they didnt lift. Floyd lifts weights but he sure as hell isnt slow. Low reps develop the fast twitch muscle fibers so how does it make you slow huh?

Theres nothing wrong with bodyweight exercises, theres many that stimulate strength as well. Do a 1 arm pullup (I can, can you raphael? lol), full planche pushups, or pistols (They all have weightlifting rivals as well). The only problem is after a while you may be able to do 20 reps, mostly targeting endurance. How will you get stronger then? GASP OMG NO! IT CANT BE! you have to add weight. Only way to do that without going up a weightclass is adding weight or weights.

itwasluck
07-15-2008, 06:04 AM
Weights make you slow and they are for bums. Alot of modern techniqes are bollocks and have nothing to do with boxing. All this strenght and conditioning coach stuff is crap. Like Roger Mayweather said, most of it has nothing to do with boxing, ie. it is not sport specific training.

No old school trainer will tell you to do weights. Fat Hatton did weights and he ain't no speedy Gonzales. Alot of the all time greats stayed away from wieghts. Usually the more fluid fighters are weights free and I don't think this ia a coincidence. Ali and Jones Jr used no weights.

If I can recall Mayweather used/uses weights, and he is very fast. Sugar Shane Mosley was extremely fast and he could bench press over 300+. Some people even say Mosley was just like Mayweather only he could do everything with power. There's a lot of boxers that lifts weights and are still fast.

Fidayin
07-15-2008, 06:36 AM
Weights make you slow and they are for bums. Alot of modern techniqes are bollocks and have nothing to do with boxing. All this strenght and conditioning coach stuff is crap. Like Roger Mayweather said, most of it has nothing to do with boxing, ie. it is not sport specific training.

No old school trainer will tell you to do weights. Fat Hatton did weights and he ain't no speedy Gonzales. Alot of the all time greats stayed away from wieghts. Usually the more fluid fighters are weights free and I don't think this ia a coincidence. Ali and Jones Jr used no weights.

roy jones jr did lift weights, how else do you expect a middelweight to go up to heavyweight and still look ript.

laurinsane8
07-15-2008, 10:24 AM
Yea I agree with sugar. You need to give your body at least one day where it does nothing. Just give every muscle group an all around rest. Even though your working different muscles every day, some exercises have muscle overlap because they depend on other muscle to stabilize the move.

i.e. push-ups, depending on the move, you'll get your back, shoulders, triceps, and chest.

But as long as your arm isn't bothering you, lifting weights should be fine. Some boxers train with weights, some do. Just find what works you for you that's all.

mkm88414
07-15-2008, 12:13 PM
call me new school or whatever but i agree with landon. compound movements in the lower rep range work.

you could also consider 1 arm dumbell snatches and swings if they dont hurt ur arm. i imagine u could benefit from some corework as well

mr tricky
07-15-2008, 08:23 PM
Weights make you slow and they are for bums. Alot of modern techniqes are bollocks and have nothing to do with boxing. All this strenght and conditioning coach stuff is crap. Like Roger Mayweather said, most of it has nothing to do with boxing, ie. it is not sport specific training.

No old school trainer will tell you to do weights. Fat Hatton did weights and he ain't no speedy Gonzales. Alot of the all time greats stayed away from wieghts. Usually the more fluid fighters are weights free and I don't think this ia a coincidence. Ali and Jones Jr used no weights.

lol you dont have a clue and always post a load of ****e,


weights can be fantastic for boxing,
my gym has trained loads of champions and always recomeds lifting weights to improve strength,

look at it this way,

person lifts weigths becomes very stong, starts boxing, becomes good powerfull boxer,
has an advantage over a weak person who begins boxing,


Muscels are muscels, they help our body move, wen they grow they are stronger and can help our body move bigger things,

A Strong muscle is a more explosive muscle, explosive muscles are needed in boxing,

weights will simply make you a better athlete at any sport as muscels become quicker,stronger, and more explosive,

only timess weights can turn bad for boxing is wen you get so big you cant hardly move an lose mobility, but that wont happen.....unless your a body builder, but you box aswell,


im sure many boxers on here use weights i know a few do

mr tricky
07-15-2008, 08:30 PM
Keep to lower reps (3-5) to avoid extra less functional mass (unless you want it). You can still gain mass that way but you will gain far more strength in as small a package as possible. Use compound lifts like: benchpress, squats, deadlifts, lunges, overhead press, clean & press, snatches etc. Use common sense deciding the number of sets for your workout and whatever you do avoid the bodybuilder hypertrophy zone (8-12 reps usually). Its not gonna kill ya to do it bodybuilder style but it will have minimal benefits and possibly (most likely) be detrimental to your performance.

In case you dont believe me www.sports-fitness-advisor.com/boxing-training.html

No offense david, you seem like an intelligent guy and probably know your stuff but getting mere size doesnt really help boxers. Rugby & football linemen on the other hand...

??????? your for getting about weight?

your basing it as if hes gona be lifting the same weight for 3-5 reps as he would for 8-12,

boxers should be doing light weights in the 8-12 rep range, as fast as they can,

3-5 range with heavy weights isnt good for boxing as it creates mass and size,

boxers want light weights and high reps,


however i dont think heavy weight low reps is too bad though.....

peewee1460
07-15-2008, 08:47 PM
the weights you lift won't matter if you don't take in the nutrients to foster growth. if u control your diet you control your weight.

sukhenkoy
07-15-2008, 09:02 PM
Personally, I lifted weights for 5 months before starting boxing. Right after entering the boxing gym, I decided to do strictly bodyweight exercises. I feel a lot stronger and more in shape because of it. But this is just me.

SugarShanep4p
07-15-2008, 11:07 PM
thanks for all the advice, but I really don't need to know how weight training carries over to boxing, I'm more interested in HOW to lift weights (although how is a somewhat broad term). What my question is, is do you lift every day doing muscle specific weight exercises and just change from day-to-day the muscle types your working as not to overwork them, or do you lift every other day no matter what groups you are working on. Waybe i was unclear, I apologize, but the advice was very helpful anyway.

sukhenkoy
07-15-2008, 11:12 PM
thanks for all the advice, but I really don't need to know how weight training carries over to boxing, I'm more interested in HOW to lift weights (although how is a somewhat broad term). What my question is, is do you lift every day doing muscle specific weight exercises and just change from day-to-day the muscle types your working as not to overwork them, or do you lift every other day no matter what groups you are working on. Waybe i was unclear, I apologize, but the advice was very helpful anyway.

WHen I lifted weights, I lifted 5 days a week, monday through friday. I didn't work the same muscles everyday, and I never really felt burnout. I don't feel like typing out all the exercises that I did, but, if you're interested, just PM me and I could send you some info.

SugarShanep4p
07-15-2008, 11:18 PM
Nah thats cool man, thats all I really wanted to know thanks. I just don't wanna end up with a repetitive strain injury or anything, this nerve thing is ****ed up enough lol I Don't need any other **** like tendonitis or something.

sukhenkoy
07-15-2008, 11:20 PM
Nah thats cool man, thats all I really wanted to know thanks. I just don't wanna end up with a repetitive strain injury or anything, this nerve thing is ****ed up enough lol I Don't need any other **** like tendonitis or something.

Yeah I get whta you're saying. However, if you do start, start out slow and with small weights. Build up the reps and weight each week. What I did was increase each set by 3 reps, and then, after 5 weeks, I increased the weight by 10 pounds, and went down by reps, until I built up to increased reps with that increased weight. Good luck man.

DutchDynamite
07-15-2008, 11:22 PM
lol you dont have a clue and always post a load of ****e,


weights can be fantastic for boxing,
my gym has trained loads of champions and always recomeds lifting weights to improve strength,

look at it this way,

person lifts weigths becomes very stong, starts boxing, becomes good powerfull boxer,
has an advantage over a weak person who begins boxing,


Muscels are muscels, they help our body move, wen they grow they are stronger and can help our body move bigger things,

A Strong muscle is a more explosive muscle, explosive muscles are needed in boxing,

weights will simply make you a better athlete at any sport as muscels become quicker,stronger, and more explosive,

only timess weights can turn bad for boxing is wen you get so big you cant hardly move an lose mobility, but that wont happen.....unless your a body builder, but you box aswell,


im sure many boxers on here use weights i know a few do

Very well said boy.

I was an amateur kick boxer way back in 1996 and i didn't listen to my coach that i had to do weights. I didn't need them i said.

It took me 10 years to realize that weight lifting is very important. It will increase your power and speed.

Landon S
07-16-2008, 01:29 AM
??????? your for getting about weight?

your basing it as if hes gona be lifting the same weight for 3-5 reps as he would for 8-12,

boxers should be doing light weights in the 8-12 rep range, as fast as they can,

3-5 range with heavy weights isnt good for boxing as it creates mass and size,

boxers want light weights and high reps,


however i dont think heavy weight low reps is too bad though.....

Actually 8-12 is the hypertrophy range. And the 3-5 reps is done with near max loads.

Rafael Benitez
07-16-2008, 05:20 AM
If I can recall Mayweather used/uses weights, and he is very fast. Sugar Shane Mosley was extremely fast and he could bench press over 300+. Some people even say Mosley was just like Mayweather only he could do everything with power. There's a lot of boxers that lifts weights and are still fast.They are people who are naturally exceptionally fast. Even then, the fighters that make punching combinations more fluid always avoid weights. there is no arguing with Ali! Mayweather also does very light weights. People who do heavy weights always end up stiff. Even Iron Mike never did that **** and he was a heavy. I apologise for not making it clear I was referring to heavy weights. Light weights is same as calisthenics which I do everyday so I would be talking **** if I said don't do light weights and fast pro fighters don't do them. Shadow hand weights also constitute light weights, and I actually think they help with sustaining speed. Alot of pro's in my gym also do 100 rep sets on their shoulders. I meant heavy weights make people slow and into bums and cause weight problems too. My bad.
roy jones jr did lift weights, how else do you expect a middelweight to go up to heavyweight and still look ript.That was his downfall. Trust me, up until 175 he did not use weights!

PunchDrunk
07-16-2008, 06:37 AM
Rafa, you are so wrong it's not even funny. Heavy weights develop your CNS and fast twitch fibres, so in fact, you get faster and more explosive. FACT!

Rafael Benitez
07-16-2008, 06:51 AM
Rafa, you are so wrong it's not even funny. Heavy weights develop your CNS and fast twitch fibres, so in fact, you get faster and more explosive. FACT!
Bollocks. they make you bulky and stiff. How do you explain the fact that they affect your weight making ability too? Heavy weights are a big no no unless you are a heavyweight.

Good in theory but in practise it will make you bulky and robotic. It might work in sprinting but boxing you need speed of reaction not just movement and bulk will slow that down. The bulk will take the snap out of your punches. Fast twitch fibres are a natural gift. Train hard to maximise what you may alreayd have buit trying to add them by doing heavy weights is a no brainer.

mr tricky
07-16-2008, 08:21 AM
Bollocks. they make you bulky and stiff. How do you explain the fact that they affect your weight making ability too? Heavy weights are a big no no unless you are a heavyweight.

Good in theory but in practise it will make you bulky and robotic. It might work in sprinting but boxing you need speed of reaction not just movement and bulk will slow that down. The bulk will take the snap out of your punches. Fast twitch fibres are a natural gift. Train hard to maximise what you may alreayd have buit trying to add them by doing heavy weights is a no brainer.


your sounding like an idiot,

lifting weights dose not make you bulky and robotic, im presuming youve never lifted weights because you ovbiosly dont have a clue,

ive been lifting for a few months now and my biceps and triceps have grows a small amount in size and my chest has become stronger, now i feel more ready to start the boxing season and improve my cardio with the extra strength i now have,

you could lift weigths for 5 years and may never become bulky , you will become stronger and quicker and more explosive , a stronger muscle is a quicker muscle,

the only time weight training affects boxing is when youve been doing it for ages and become to big you lose mobility and become bulky, will that ever happen to some one startiing to lift weights ,no? it happens after years of pure bodybuilding

mr tricky
07-16-2008, 08:22 AM
my advice to thread starter,


type ''bodybuilding'' in google and go on the big super site that is all about weight lifting and bodybuilding articels

PunchDrunk
07-16-2008, 11:08 AM
Bollocks. they make you bulky and stiff. How do you explain the fact that they affect your weight making ability too? Heavy weights are a big no no unless you are a heavyweight.

Good in theory but in practise it will make you bulky and robotic. It might work in sprinting but boxing you need speed of reaction not just movement and bulk will slow that down. The bulk will take the snap out of your punches. Fast twitch fibres are a natural gift. Train hard to maximise what you may alreayd have buit trying to add them by doing heavy weights is a no brainer.

You obviously have neither theoretical background or hands on experience with this. I took over an experienced lightweight boxer a few years ago. Started him on the weights (amongst a bunch of other alterations in his workouts). Result? He got stronger, quicker, more explosive, and we moved him to featherweight. That is as practical, real world as it gets!

As for what you're saying about sprinters and reaction, well that's quite funny really. What is the most important aspect for a top class sprinter? Reaction time at the beginning of the race.

Also, you keep talking about bulk. Bulk is a result of diet first, and second training the right way. For bulking, the best rep range is 8-12, which means medium weight, not heavy. You can use heavy weights to bulk of course, but you'll need a large volume of work (many sets). When training a boxer, I keep the sets down (3-4) and the reps down. This, along with a boxer's diet, and all the other training (which is 80-90% of his work after all) he's doing, makes it next to impossible to gain any significant amount of muscle. What makes them stronger then? Neural adaptations. Look it up before you embarass yourself more with your total ignorance on the subject.

PS: If bulking up was so easy that a boxer would get too big just like that, why the **** is everybody else in the world talking about steroids and yearning for that magic pill that will make them big? In the real world it doesn't work like that. Get some theoretical knowledge, then some real world experience, or shut the **** up.

Trrmo
07-16-2008, 11:29 AM
Also, you keep talking about bulk. Bulk is a result of diet first, and second training the right way. For bulking, the best rep range is 8-12, which means medium weight, not heavy. You can use heavy weights to bulk of course, but you'll need a large volume of work (many sets).

Pretty much agree with you PunchDrunk, but in the RIPPETOE starting strength system (which is highly regarded amongst bodybuilders for beginners to intermediate) you do reps of just 5 not 8-12 and can make great muscles gains (bulk up) not just beginners.

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=998224

I tried it for a few months when I wasnt boxing training and gained muscle and alot of strength (gained alot fat at the same time too, I got to 83kgs and now I am 74 back boxing training!).

But as you said it is DIET meaning calorie excess which is needed to bulk, otherwise you will certainly get stronger but no calorie excess - no bulking. I ate ALOT when I was doingthe Rippetoe training.

I dont think most people need to worry about bulking up too much, it is actually hard to do especially with a boxers diet and training, unless you are genetically gifted.

PunchDrunk
07-16-2008, 03:08 PM
Pretty much agree with you PunchDrunk, but in the RIPPETOE starting strength system (which is highly regarded amongst bodybuilders for beginners to intermediate) you do reps of just 5 not 8-12 and can make great muscles gains (bulk up) not just beginners.

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=998224

I tried it for a few months when I wasnt boxing training and gained muscle and alot of strength (gained alot fat at the same time too, I got to 83kgs and now I am 74 back boxing training!).

But as you said it is DIET meaning calorie excess which is needed to bulk, otherwise you will certainly get stronger but no calorie excess - no bulking. I ate ALOT when I was doingthe Rippetoe training.

I dont think most people need to worry about bulking up too much, it is actually hard to do especially with a boxers diet and training, unless you are genetically gifted.

Sure, there are many ways to skin a horse. What I outlined were the bare fundamentals, the basic theory. In reality you twist this to suit individuals (experience, goals, how they respond, etc.). :)

SugarShanep4p
07-16-2008, 10:39 PM
yeah, heavy weights cant make you robotic, thats something you would develop while training

J_CON
07-18-2008, 11:09 AM
FOr boxing, its best to do Back,Shoulders, and legs.

PunchDrunk
07-18-2008, 11:44 AM
FOr boxing, its best to do Back,Shoulders, and legs.

For boxing it's best to do the whole body, with and individualized program that targets your needs, strengths and weaknesses...