View Full Version : if ur heart hurts when running


sterling
07-09-2008, 11:02 AM
what shud u do? what is my body telling me? i did a 4 mile run up alot of hills and my heart felt like it was coming out of my chest.
Is it because i didnt eat enough or drink enough before my run? i only had cereal and a banna and drank a bit of water.

LatinoGloves
07-09-2008, 11:04 AM
what shud u do? what is my body telling me? i did a 4 mile run up alot of hills and my heart felt like it was coming out of my chest.
Is it because i didnt eat enough or drink enough before my run? i only had cereal and a banna and drank a bit of water.


i dunno, but this happens to me sometimes too.

RUSTYBOXER
07-09-2008, 11:13 AM
i think its from not having enough glucose and training hard all at once. you body needs time to adapt. so you do it to fast and it starts hurting. i could be wrong.

sterling
07-09-2008, 11:16 AM
k well im glad this is the last day im training because ive been having alot of problems with my back,eyes going blurry because of lack of sugar, legs and heart.
Finally its over til i go on my army phase 1 training on monday lol and im use to training because i box but i train extra hard for my army phase 1.

!! Shawn
07-09-2008, 11:27 AM
what shud u do? what is my body telling me? i did a 4 mile run up alot of hills and my heart felt like it was coming out of my chest.
Is it because i didnt eat enough or drink enough before my run? i only had cereal and a banna and drank a bit of water.


Its cancer...

Sadler
07-09-2008, 01:32 PM
Mine always does that aswell, after only like 1 mile

cibola4
07-09-2008, 01:37 PM
yeah mine used to do that too after about a mile or so...but i didnt really worry too much about it...i used to run cross crountry before i got lazy for like a year...and a lot of people have had that problem...i think i agree with what rusty boxer said...probably just need more nutrients...right now im to slow to even worry about getting my heart going its so damn hot in yuma right now...
good luck with the army though
i am going into the airforce as soon as i get cleared again at meps

danny stash
07-09-2008, 02:13 PM
could be your diaphragm not your heart. When I really overdue my cardio a few days in a row my diaphragm hurts...feels like your heart though.

P4PKING_2008
07-09-2008, 03:29 PM
I think you've got cancer.

THE REED™
07-09-2008, 03:30 PM
stop running......

King Koopa
07-09-2008, 03:32 PM
stop running......

Is running really bad for your knees?

Shambleton
07-09-2008, 03:34 PM
I don't get that, but every time I run after about 3 miles my right foot goes totally numb, you know like when you fall asleep in a funny postion and you wake up and can't feel your foot.
I dunno what the **** that is, probably just poor circulation but I don't know why.
Does anyone else get this??

THE REED™
07-09-2008, 03:34 PM
Is running really bad for your knees?

yeah, its terrible for your knees... when your 50, youll know what im sayin

Shambleton
07-09-2008, 03:38 PM
yeah, its terrible for your knees... when your 50, youll know what im sayin

Roadrunning isn't great for joints in general but running on grass is good for your knees.

JoeCalzaghe
07-09-2008, 09:50 PM
what shud u do? what is my body telling me? i did a 4 mile run up alot of hills and my heart felt like it was coming out of my chest.
Is it because i didnt eat enough or drink enough before my run? i only had cereal and a banna and drank a bit of water.


You're probably over training, a common mistake for any athlete.




Here's some real dope for getting in shape and maximizing your training:
Learn to train by monitoring your heart rate.


You should preferably buy a digital heart rate monitor but you can make do in the beginning by learning to take your pulse. I'm assuming you at least have an accurate, easy to read watch. The two most convenient points are the radial artery or the carotid. Use your index and middle fingers and never your thumb. The trick is learning to take it quickly and accurately because the heart rate drops off fast and you'll be looking to find your peak rates while training. You measure for 6 seconds and multiply by 10, this gives you your BPM (beats per minute). You also need to monitor your resting pulse rate. For accuracy you should do this when you first wake up and measure for the full 60 seconds. When I was in actively training my resting pulse rate was in the low-mid 40's. If you're not using a training journal it's time to start.


There's tons of info on the formulas and training methods just look it up.
While you're researching this also learn the difference between aerobic vs. anaerobic training. The key to maximizing you potential as an athlete is learning how and when to vary your training methods and to avoid over training. Anyone who is not seeing improvements needs to work on their cerebral conditioning.



Joe

JC Warrior
07-09-2008, 11:51 PM
I've seen this happen fairly often and it's almost always been from guys who didn't warm up enough. Not that there is a fast food fix for this but try light jogging for 10-15 minutes and then resting for five minutes before getting into the meat and potatoes of your running.

Rafael Benitez
07-10-2008, 12:33 AM
drink more water. What you may think is your heart might just be dry lungs or other types of chest pain related to digestion. Also, consult your doctor. I thought I was having a heart attack in middle school which turned out to be acid coming up from my stomach. It went away after ten minutes.

GamerCloud
07-10-2008, 03:08 PM
Here are my thoughts...

When running the most important thing that controls your heartrate is your breathing, assuming you're not running like some kind of sprinting maniac. Controlling your breathing won't necessarily keep your heartrate at exactly the same level during different intensities of your run, but it will control how fast your heartrate climbs when heading into an elevated intensity and also controls the maximum heartrate at that level until you gas out or decide to lower the intensity.


The biggest obstacle in controlling your breathing is just not paying attention to what your body is trying to communicate to your brain. The goal is to keep a level of consistency that you feel your body can handle, I believe you can figure out what your body can handle consistently in the first few minutes you get your feet moving if you're not a complete newb. Interval training is a different story.


At different intensities you have to be able to know how much harder you can push yourself, for how long you can go at that level for and if your body is resilient enough to be able to recover from that extra hard period of running. Then to do it all over again, I assume most people have many periods of higher intensity on their run. I guess the best thing to do is to start off at a small level and try to understand how your body feels after the period of high intensity and recovery. Think: how hard and how long did I go and how did my body recover. No matter how small a level that may have been or how arrogantly you feel that you didn't bust a sweat, always keep that statement in mind.



Other than that bro. I have no idea why your heart is out of whack. I hope it's nothing you can't help.

sukhenkoy
07-10-2008, 07:10 PM
Here are my thoughts...

When running the most important thing that controls your heartrate is your breathing, assuming you're not running like some kind of sprinting maniac. Controlling your breathing won't necessarily keep your heartrate at exactly the same level during different intensities of your run, but it will control how fast your heartrate climbs when heading into an elevated intensity and also controls the maximum heartrate at that level until you gas out or decide to lower the intensity.


The biggest obstacle in controlling your breathing is just not paying attention to what your body is trying to communicate to your brain. The goal is to keep a level of consistency that you feel your body can handle, I believe you can figure out what your body can handle consistently in the first few minutes you get your feet moving if you're not a complete newb. Interval training is a different story.


At different intensities you have to be able to know how much harder you can push yourself, for how long you can go at that level for and if your body is resilient enough to be able to recover from that extra hard period of running. Then to do it all over again, I assume most people have many periods of higher intensity on their run. I guess the best thing to do is to start off at a small level and try to understand how your body feels after the period of high intensity and recovery. Think: how hard and how long did I go and how did my body recover. No matter how small a level that may have been or how arrogantly you feel that you didn't bust a sweat, always keep that statement in mind.



Other than that bro. I have no idea why your heart is out of whack. I hope it's nothing you can't help.

Yeah. Good post. I remember when I played competitive footy I always breathed through my mouth - when jogging, running, sprinting, etc. When I started boxing training, I started doing my runs by breathing in 4 steps through my nose, and then exhaling 4 steps out my mouth, and I almost never had heart pains (with soccer I often had them). Try breathing differently if you aren't already doing so.