View Full Version : Weight Training for Boxers


blockburna944
10-31-2004, 01:17 AM
I know for a long time that it was considered bad for boxers to lift weights, but since now that myth has mostly been proven untrue, what kind of boxing programs do/should competitive boxers use?
Right now, I lift 3 sets at high reps (17-15-13) and do a large variety of exercises, rotating upper and lower body works day to day and resting on Sundays. (Except for bench press, I am following the Soviet Program, so that is on a different schedule.)
Spinx gave his routine in another post which is mostly upper body and also high reps.
Whar are the most effective exercises, rotations, reps, and etc. for weight training for boxers?

Eken
10-31-2004, 06:04 AM
You should do more sets and fewer repetitions, with explosive performance. I would suggest someting like 5 sets, 6 reps. Also take a litte longer break between sets than usual and try to stick to fundamental exercises like the benchpress, deadlift, squats etc

leff
10-31-2004, 06:47 AM
NO NO NO, 10-15 rep 3 set fore stregth.
Many sets vil make you big and bulky.And try lift as explosiv as you can.
By the way weightlifting is a overratted boxing exercise.

Dr.Pugilist
10-31-2004, 11:57 AM
Never do 8-15 reps if you want to box.

That will build weightlifting strength and size, but will do nothing for power or quickness.

Use explosive weightlifting and plyometrics. Olympic style clean , jerk, and press do wonders for explosive power, but do not necessarily build any excess size. They will increase vertical leaping ability and punching power.

I would also recommend sprints, weightless vertical leap exercises (jumps, lunges, high skips), and simple things like clap push-ups.

Reps should be under 6 or over 15.

The 15+ rep sets should be relatively slow on the negative and explosive (as fast as safely possible) on the positive. These sets will help you maintain power in your punches for long exchanges, since the sets last for 30 secs or so.

If you you keep the heavy sets under 6 then you will not build too much size, but can increase your strength.

Dr.Pugilist
10-31-2004, 11:59 AM
Remember, we want power, not strength. That's why those 6'2" 350 pound olympic weightlifters can still have 30+ inch vertical leaps. Would much rather take a punch from a Lee Haney than a Vasily Alexeyev.

Dyl-G
10-31-2004, 12:38 PM
what do you guys mean by explosive?

blockburna944
10-31-2004, 01:29 PM
Thanks for the advice so far. Any reccommendation on rest time between sets and exercises?

Dr.Pugilist
10-31-2004, 05:56 PM
By explosive I mean pushing as hard and as fast with the weights or your own body weight. There should be no slow portions of a lift. You should power throw the whole rep...your weights should probably make a little noise. There is a tendency when lifting weights to move the weight in such a tightly controlled manner that the rep is too slow. Focus on moving the weight as fast as possible, even if it means using less weight than you would like.

For heavy sets allow at LEAST 90-120 secs between sets. The sets shoudl be 6 reps or less and very intense.

For light sets , at least 15 reps, allow only 45 secs to a minute between sets. The weight should be light enough to do fairly quickly with each rep , and not too strenuously on your first set. For instance, if you max at say 200 on bench, throw on 95 or 115 and do 15-20 fast reps with that.

maxpayne
10-31-2004, 09:46 PM
remember to keep a good form, dont get sloppy on your form and lift explosively

bigtex
11-01-2004, 03:12 PM
anyone ever use a machine called the supercat? that sucker will do wonders for power in your legs.

Binks
11-04-2004, 09:20 PM
http://rossboxing.com/thegym/thegym3.htm
you can read there a little something about weight training for boxers

Dyl-G
11-05-2004, 12:01 AM
i dont no how necessary weight lifting is, but just training itself will get you in shape. also shadow boxing with weights for a couple rounds then shadow boxing without weights for one round at the end i heard really helps speed and stamina to keep your hands up. spinksjinx really helped a lot but i also found this really good website after a super long time of looking that shows all the muscles in your body, all the excrersises you can do to target them and what you can you use to do them. for example: machines, dumbells, barbells, etcetera... http://www.exrx.net/Lists/Directory.html

blockburna944
11-05-2004, 01:59 AM
i dont no how necessary weight lifting is, but just training itself will get you in shape. also shadow boxing with weights for a couple rounds then shadow boxing without weights for one round at the end i heard really helps speed and stamina to keep your hands up. spinksjinx really helped a lot but i also found this really good website after a super long time of looking that shows all the muscles in your body, all the excrersises you can do to target them and what you can you use to do them. for example: machines, dumbells, barbells, etcetera... http://www.exrx.net/Lists/Directory.html
Really good website. Binks' is pretty helpful too. I'm still skeptical about shadow boxing with weights though, especially since my right shoulder is kinda suspect.

acquitted
11-05-2004, 05:55 AM
I know for a long time that it was considered bad for boxers to lift weights, but since now that myth has mostly been proven untrue, what kind of boxing programs do/should competitive boxers use?
Right now, I lift 3 sets at high reps (17-15-13) and do a large variety of exercises, rotating upper and lower body works day to day and resting on Sundays. (Except for bench press, I am following the Soviet Program, so that is on a different schedule.)
Spinx gave his routine in another post which is mostly upper body and also high reps.
Whar are the most effective exercises, rotations, reps, and etc. for weight training for boxers?


who says its been proven untrue? lifting alot of weights tightens u up makeing u slower and less flexiable for throwing punches..other then bench press and bi-cep curls i wouldnt recommened lifting weights

Binks
11-06-2004, 06:25 PM
Myths About Weight Training For Boxers


Weight training will make the boxer slower
Science has proven that weight training can actually help to increase your speed and explosiveness. A properly developed weight program will NOT sacrifice the speed of the boxer.


Weight training will make your muscles tight and more prone to fatigue
A proper weight training routine will increase your stamina and make the fighter feel strong. Muscle soreness if often caused more from over training and poor nutritional habits.


Weight training is only beneficial if done with light weights and high reps
A boxer has little to gain from a weight routine that emphasizes high reps and light weights. High repetitions will lead to minor improvements in aerobic capacity. This form of training will do little to increase explosive speed and power. The boxer must perform medium to heavy lifts with fast, ballistic movements. See below for more specifics.


Weight training will decrease the flexibility of a fighter, limiting their range of motion
Proper weight training will actually increase your range of motion and provide greater flexibility. You must perform all exercises with a full range of motion and stretch the muscles when you are finished.


Boxers do not have time or a need for weight training
EXCUSES!! If you feel that you have no time for strength training, make time for LOSING! A boxer must do many things to be successful such as running, sparring, fighting, and strength training. Not one element alone will make a champion, rather an integrated, complete approach is needed. Remember that strength training alone will NOT get you in shape to box. Rather, it can help your overall training plan.

got that from the link i posted above

spinksjinx
11-06-2004, 07:25 PM
Lifting can be good and bad, highly depends on the movements you like to do...I've visited ross boxing and wasnt really attracted to it, but it seems to help some....


Each day, Im finding out more and more lifting is bad for me in boxing....I've got a horrible case of tennis elbow from doing skullcrushers and I cant throw a punch....

blockburna944
11-06-2004, 08:29 PM
Lifting can be good and bad, highly depends on the movements you like to do...I've visited ross boxing and wasnt really attracted to it, but it seems to help some....


Each day, Im finding out more and more lifting is bad for me in boxing....I've got a horrible case of tennis elbow from doing skullcrushers and I cant throw a punch....
The big thing about weightlifting tha most people neglect is technique. Lifting will be bad for your flexibility when you don't lift the full range of motion in an exercise, and some exercises - especially freeweights - it can be very difficult to have perfect technique, which will lead to some joint problems. My shoulder and back (ive had mild scoliosis since i was in junior high) can sometimes be problematic when i overwork, but other than that, i don't experience too many joint problems. Its also very important to stretch well before and after lifting (and pretty much any heavy exercise). I'm not the most flexible guy so i've never worried about overstretching, but it can be a problem for some.

I'll be interested to find out if that hindu program you posted about in the other thread will fix those types of problems like a lot of people claimed on various websites. I'm still contemplating about doing a longterm program with that routine. It does seem effective though.

Swifty
11-06-2004, 09:56 PM
"I've got a horrible case of tennis elbow from doing skullcrushers and I cant throw a punch"

Exactly the same thing happened to me ! Except i could manage to throw punches, cept it hurt like a *****.

spinksjinx
11-06-2004, 10:17 PM
Swifty-Suck doesnt? I havent been able to extend it to even sign my name and have to type with one hand, it blows and the only treatment to get rid of it fast (although it will come back) is a cortizone shot, but that is short term so im not interested and just waiting for it to heal.

blockburna-Yes I agree 100% a lot of people lift heavier then they should be although they can bring it up they drop a little in form and some think that is ok....


Im starting the Hindu program for about 3-6 weeks and see how the results come, It seems pretty brutal and can be a bit dangerous if bad in form (back bridge/handstand pushups)

Im very interested in seeing how this does w/ my physical strength compared to lifting weights and conventional calisthenics, I will be sure to report it and if anyone else is giving it a try I would like to hear your responses from it as well.

RJj1fan
11-06-2004, 11:53 PM
How would strength training not help with your punching power?

leff
11-07-2004, 04:33 AM
How would strength training not help with your punching power?

God question, its not good getting bulky, slow and stiff.

Strengthtraining helps fore power if you do it right, but the bag is so much better fore power than weights.

buff_mike10
01-28-2005, 01:38 AM
I keep hearing people complaining about getting tennis elbow from skull cruskers. You have to go through the entire range of motion. You have to keep your elbows in the same position, and FULLY extend your arms when you come up, lock them. Skull crushers are the best way to get huge tricpes, if you want 19-20 arms you gotta do them. Boxers better watch, cause once you get past 17 your gonna lose speed

hectari
01-28-2005, 07:14 PM
I need muscle mass

jack_the_rippuh
01-28-2005, 10:53 PM
I don't think any fighter 135 and down needs any types of weights do get fit...do push-ups, pull-ups, anything dealing with bodyweight..