View Full Version : rep range


lilaznjoker
03-02-2008, 05:41 AM
how many reps is good for boxing.
say for calisthenics do max reps or 8-12 for sets?

Mickey Gomez
03-02-2008, 07:21 AM
Don't measure your sets by reps, rather go until failure.

Training to failure is to continue repetitions to the point of momentary muscular failure. Failure is not the point where you think you cannot do another rep, it is the point where you physically can not complete another repetition.

Training to failure should be emplyed in all aspects of training including cardio. By training to failure, one fatigues enough of the muscle fibres to prevent another rep. This increases muscle endurance, strength and power.

Your first set of reps can be used as a warm up where you do not continue until failure.

lilaznjoker
03-02-2008, 04:55 PM
why do they say 8-12 is the optimal for muscular hypertrophy and endurancea nd strength then ? so confusing.

Kayo
03-02-2008, 08:09 PM
why do they say 8-12 is the optimal for muscular hypertrophy and endurancea nd strength then ? so confusing.

8-12 is for size

Mickey Gomez
03-02-2008, 08:25 PM
If you slow your reps down or adjust your body position you may be able to reach failure in the 8-12 range.

Take crunches for example, if you position your arms at the side of your head and complete each repetition slowly (about 2 seconds for each rep) you will be able to reach failure sooner.

Also for press ups slow down the motion and add an incline. Elevate your feet by using the edge of the boxing ring or a bench.

Same goes for chin ups, slower reps means failure sooner.

I don't worry about rep range. I don't even count while performing calisthenics, my trainer counts for me so we can monitor progress. When I'm doing my reps I'm just concentrating on doing as much as I physically can.

lilaznjoker
03-03-2008, 12:23 AM
so slow down explosive up?

Mickey Gomez
03-04-2008, 05:52 AM
so slow down explosive up?

Slow down, slow up.

There are specific exercises you can use for explosiveness.

Clap hand press ups are great for explosiveness, and if you're finding them easy you can try triple clap push ups

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Or you can try the medicine ball punch

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lilaznjoker
03-04-2008, 05:16 PM
ooh. okay. so if i want to gain a few pounds, then do 8-12 then switch to max reps. is it ok to do max reps everyday?

Mickey Gomez
03-04-2008, 06:11 PM
ooh. okay. so if i want to gain a few pounds, then do 8-12 then switch to max reps. is it ok to do max reps everyday?

Calisthenics yes. I wouldnt lift weights to failure everyday.

lilaznjoker
03-06-2008, 03:10 AM
thanks for the advice. for now i think i'mma just go to failure every other day and 8-12 between those days.

Rob Pilger
03-06-2008, 09:20 AM
Be careful with going to failure cause it can be harder to recover from and more importantly your form can go to ****. Our nervous systems is like a computer, junk form in, junk form out in performance. Faulty movement patterns will hinder you.

To increase the intensity with the calisthenics add a weight vest and if you want to add a bit of size keep the reps between 6-10. More mybofibril hypertrophy ( functional ) with this rep bracket.

Always end the the set with 1 good rep left in the tank, this ensures proper training form. You don't want to look like your ****ing the floor at the end of your push up set.

6-12 reps create more of a cellular adaption because of the lighter intensity, that's strength training is neural adaption and heavy intensity is key, hence the use of 1-5 reps. However beginners can gain strength with reps of 8-15 because of the neural adaptions and them being at the bottom of their genetic potential, these gains however will last anywhere from 12-16 weeks then the reps must change to more maximum like 5 reps to gain strength.

Rob Pilger
http://www.boxingperformance.com
http://www.theultimateboxingworkout.com/fighters.html