View Full Version : Weight Training for Boxing


mamoroso04
02-25-2008, 09:51 PM
Before I started boxing I had an impressive list of powerlifting accomplishments, but I hated doing it and I wanted to do something I liked, being boxing. I don't want to stop training with heavy weights all together as part of my routine. So I was just wondering what everyone else did with weights as a part of their regimen, or if they use weights at all. Thanks.

TexasTitan
02-25-2008, 09:59 PM
I was a buody builder before I got back into boxing. honestly, you wont be touching weights for a while. I only do things with 3 pounders and light deadlifts and pull ups now.

Youll be shocked at how much strength you maintain tho.

Domey
02-25-2008, 10:25 PM
With boxing you'll want to do light weights, with high repititions. Reason being you dont want to be big and bulky. You just want to make your muscles more solid.

If you're big and bulky, your arms are forced to be further away from your body, which leaves you very vulnerable, along with speed factor.

Also muscle weighs more then fat as you know, so you'll have a harder time losing weight.

I would only lift weights, as in medium to heavy weights if I were in a big weight division. Personally I fight at featherweight / lightweight. So weights arnt my thing.

mamoroso04
02-25-2008, 10:32 PM
Yeah I'm a 133 pounder myself, it's on a 5'5" frame though so I guess you could say I'm kind of stocky. Hopefully it won't pose much of a problem. I think I will replace the heavy weight training with a lot of calisthenics, as those have always been a strong point of mine.

toolboxdiver
02-25-2008, 10:37 PM
Before I started boxing I had an impressive list of powerlifting accomplishments, but I hated doing it and I wanted to do something I liked, being boxing. I don't want to stop training with heavy weights all together as part of my routine. So I was just wondering what everyone else did with weights as a part of their regimen, or if they use weights at all. Thanks.

You can also do explosive power exercises, these will help out with boxing

here is a good video from Ross Boxing building explosive power
http://www.rosstraining.com/articles/hardcore.html
and it didn't sacrifice any speed so he says. It's very impressive

fraidycat
02-25-2008, 10:38 PM
Before I started boxing I had an impressive list of powerlifting accomplishments, but I hated doing it and I wanted to do something I liked, being boxing. I don't want to stop training with heavy weights all together as part of my routine. So I was just wondering what everyone else did with weights as a part of their regimen, or if they use weights at all. Thanks.

Please use the search function. This question has been answered on these boards at least half a dozen times, in depth.

PunchDrunk
02-26-2008, 01:04 AM
Please use the search function. This question has been answered on these boards at least half a dozen times, in depth.

It's still amazing to me, that everytime the question is asked, a few guys appear out of the woodwork, claiming you have to do high reps/light weight though... Never the same guys as last time, but there's always a few of those "experts"... :banana:

Fidayin
02-26-2008, 10:27 AM
u wont get big and bulky if u lift heavy weights, it has to do with ur genetics and the diet u follow. Bodybuilding is more complicated then just using heavy weights

Domey
02-26-2008, 03:23 PM
A correct diet for body buildling. Like a protien diet. Boxers take in alot of protien as well.

Lifting heavy weights will increase your size. I am not saying you are going to get totally ripped jack and become Mr. USA. But your muscles will get bigger.

PunchDrunk
02-26-2008, 04:40 PM
A correct diet for body buildling. Like a protien diet. Boxers take in alot of protien as well.

Lifting heavy weights will increase your size. I am not saying you are going to get totally ripped jack and become Mr. USA. But your muscles will get bigger.

The difference between boxers and bodybuilders is that bodybuilders take in an excess of calories, or they can't grow, where boxers restrict their calorie intake, so they won't gain weight. On a calorie restricted diet no amount of lifting in the world can make you grow!

Hypertrophy is best achieved using the midrange rep area (6-12), where heavy, lowrep (1-5) is primarily for strength. Add to that the fact that boxers 1. Should not use the same volume of work when lifting, and 2. Boxers do a lot of other training that influences their bodycomposition in the opposite direction, and you have a situation where a boxer will get stronger and not bigger, while lifting heavy weights as part of his training

You also seem confuse the concept of getting ripped with that of getting bigger. Getting ripped is a matter of losing fat.

BrooklynBomber
02-26-2008, 04:57 PM
Just a side note, I made up a list of exercises that I think any boxer should implement in their training:

Pullups/Chinups
Squats
deadlifts
Powercleans, snatches, jerks, olympic lifts in short.
Military Presses

If you noted, all of these exercises are big multijoint movements(compoun exercises) and I think they are a very good way to built the strength in the areas where many people are usually lacking(for boxing)

Domey
02-26-2008, 05:06 PM
I am not confusing getting ripped with getting bigger. Was just using a figure of speach.

Sure, if you are sticking to a strict diet with nothing but the lowest calories possible. But honestly who is sticking to that day in and day out? Not many people are that disciplined.

Secondly I dont even diet like that myself untill a few weeks before a fight. I pretty much eat whatever I want untill I am in training camp. I also have a very high metabolism so eating whatever I want does not really do much to me.

I really dont see the point in lifting heavy weights at all. I have barely lifted weights in my career as a fighter. I know and have trained with world champions that never lifted either. So to me, from my experience, and what works for me, is no weights.

There is enough risk in training in boxing alone of hurting yourself, I would much prefer to stay away from straining myself lifting.

If weights works for you, then knock yourself out. I'll stick to what has worked for me.

Domey
02-26-2008, 05:11 PM
On another note nor do I claim to be an expert about boxing, or lifting weights. As said I never lift weights so honestly I know nothing about it. I just mentioned what my trainer has told other people. He is 70 years old and very old school so his methods may be out of date.

However, as far as boxing. I have been involved in boxing my entire life and I do know what I am talking about.

mamoroso04
02-26-2008, 05:50 PM
Sorry if I misled anyone by asking about the weight training. I know how to get bigger and how to get stronger, I mentioned I was formerly a competitive powerlifter. I'd just like to know what everyone else does, and get their personal opinions on the matter.

Rob Pilger
02-26-2008, 08:06 PM
mamorosso, I lift heavy weights too, I can squat 505lbs. dead lift 500lbs., bench 405 lbs, all raw. and I have very fast hands for 230lbs.

You can't keep the heavy lifting up with high volumes of boxing training, because they will compete with nervous system reserves. I mean if your nervous system is still fried from the boxing training you won't lift as much.

That being said, I box 3 days per week and have 2 max effort days per week, 1 Upper, 1 Lower, and 1 speed/power day, with repetition method mixed with that. I delaod every 4th week.

The program can change as it often does if I'm not recovered enough from boxing training, or boxing training if I'm not recovered enough from my high volume strength training. I however use a lot of volume, so all I have to do is cut the volume and I will recover better and perform better.

I cycle my upper and lower lifts every 4th week too. Box squats, band squats, Squat with Chains, sumo deadlifts, pin squats. 2-3-4 board press, band press, chain press, floor press, incline press ex.. cycle speed/power work, plyo push ups, box jumps, med ball throws, jump squats, side med ball throws etc.

Lifting heavy AND explosive makes you better period! They didn't have this knowledge back in the old school days, The Soviets did and thats why the eastern bloc countries have kicked are asses for years in the most telling event... The Olympics!

Lifting light weights is the biggest bull**** myth for boxing! Put that **** to rest. Enough already. That doesn't get you explosive

Rob Pilger
http://www.boxingperformance.com
http://www.theultimateboxingworkout.com/fighters.html

bundjalung
02-27-2008, 01:04 AM
In the gym, the trainers always tell me not to waste my time with heavy weights. But it feels great when you are sparring, knowing the other guy can't push you around when you're in close. And you definitely notice the difference on fight night.

Keep the exercises compound and explosive like the above posts say. Last fight, I periodised the explosive lifts with more plyometrics closer to the fight. It worked well. Just got to keep the exercises functional.

PunchDrunk
02-27-2008, 08:43 AM
I am not confusing getting ripped with getting bigger. Was just using a figure of speach..
Fair enough...

Sure, if you are sticking to a strict diet with nothing but the lowest calories possible. But honestly who is sticking to that day in and day out? Not many people are that disciplined.

Secondly I dont even diet like that myself untill a few weeks before a fight. I pretty much eat whatever I want untill I am in training camp. I also have a very high metabolism so eating whatever I want does not really do much to me.
1. You don't have to starve yourself to avoid growing bigger from an athletic weight/strength program. Heck, ask any would be bodybuilder how hard getting bigger is! If growing was as easy as you make it sound, there would be no steroid users. ;)
2. If your metabolisms very high, that would only mean you'd have to eat even more if you want to grow. The calories all go somewhere...

I really dont see the point in lifting heavy weights at all. I have barely lifted weights in my career as a fighter. I know and have trained with world champions that never lifted either. So to me, from my experience, and what works for me, is no weights.
Straw man argument. I don't see the point in not smoking cigarettes, some fighters have smoked and become world champions. Does that mean it's a good idea?
Sure, they were world champions, but if they've never tried implementing a strength program into their training, how do they/you know they couldn't have been even better if they had?

There is enough risk in training in boxing alone of hurting yourself, I would much prefer to stay away from straining myself lifting.
Another quite useful thing about weights, is that they're actually a very valuable injury prevention tool. This requires you to leave your ego in the dressing room though.

If weights works for you, then knock yourself out. I'll stick to what has worked for me.
Hey, I have no problem with you sticking to your own thing. I just think it's a bad idea when you come into a thread and give faulty advice about something you admittedly know nothing about. :)

On another note nor do I claim to be an expert about boxing, or lifting weights. As said I never lift weights so honestly I know nothing about it.

big paulie
02-27-2008, 08:51 AM
My advice would be to incorporate light weightlifting in order to help move up a weight divsion but certainly not as a regular thing, speed, fluidity, mobility are all important attributes that could be affected by weightlifting

Rob Pilger
02-27-2008, 09:44 AM
Yes weightlifting can affect speed.... By improving it. Strength training has shown to IMPROVE rom. By strength training through a relative rom.

People need to understand that strength training deals with, recruits the nervous systems not the cellular. How can this restrict rom?, it can't, if you train through a relative rom. True strength training has a strong nervous system effect, that will make you stronger, faster, and more explosive period.


Rob Pilger
http://www.boxingperformance.com
http://www.theultimateboxingworkout.com/fighters.html