View Full Version : deadlifting and boxing?


johnjamieson
02-22-2008, 12:20 PM
what do you guys feel about deadlifting for boxing? I want to start deadlifting for strength but I don't want it to negatively affect anything else.

fraidycat
02-22-2008, 12:30 PM
what do you guys feel about deadlifting for boxing? I want to start deadlifting for strength but I don't want it to negatively affect anything else.

Compound movements are the only weightlifting you should be doing, IMO, unless you have something specific that is weak -- i.e., severely restricted movement in your shoulder girdle or imbalance between your hamstrings and quads or somesuch -- that is affecting your boxing.

Personally, I only do deadlifts, squats, and cleans. Anything else is just jerking off. Boxing is more like ballet than like football; you don't need rippling biceps or bulging muscles to box well; you need coordination and strength. If you lack coordination and strength, then Olympic-style lifts -- like the deadlift when done correctly -- are an excellent way to help develop them.

Use the Search function for "weights" or "weightlifting" to see the great debate.

Detroit101
02-22-2008, 12:33 PM
Deadlifts are excellent for all around explosive power.....I cant see how there would be any negative effects, it is an exercise that should be in everyone's repertoire....

TexasTitan
02-22-2008, 01:32 PM
Light deads are great.

Count Patron
02-22-2008, 01:36 PM
It cracks me up how everyone thinks that if they lift heavy weights they'll become muscle bound overnight. You have to TRY to get big and bulky, it's not like you do 10 reps of heavy and then the next morning you are a bodybuilder.

VBoxer
02-22-2008, 03:03 PM
When doing deadlifts, do you want to do high reps or low reps?

THE REED™
02-22-2008, 03:04 PM
It cracks me up how everyone thinks that if they lift heavy weights they'll become muscle bound overnight. You have to TRY to get big and bulky, it's not like you do 10 reps of heavy and then the next morning you are a bodybuilder.

LOL true.....

TexasTitan
02-22-2008, 03:14 PM
When doing deadlifts, do you want to do high reps or low reps?

High Reps. Low Weight. At least for boxing.

And yeah, you really have to eat a whole different way and lift a whole different way to get 10 pounds of muscle, I used to lift like a bodybuilder and doing some light deads wont do anything but make you stronger.

BrooklynBomber
02-22-2008, 03:45 PM
High Reps. Low Weight. At least for boxing.

And yeah, you really have to eat a whole different way and lift a whole different way to get 10 pounds of muscle, I used to lift like a bodybuilder and doing some light deads wont do anything but make you stronger.

Not true, high rep low weight is pretty much useless for boxing.

What you need in boxing is an explosive strength and the best way to develop explosive strength(in other words fast twitch muscles, since some people understand that better) is through low rep high intensity training.

At some point training with medium weight can be added but you have to execute the movement(with medium weight) as quickly and explosively as possible.

Working with low weight your high treshold motoric units are not used and the goal is pretty much is not achieved.

PunchDrunk
02-22-2008, 03:48 PM
High Reps. Low Weight. At least for boxing.

And yeah, you really have to eat a whole different way and lift a whole different way to get 10 pounds of muscle, I used to lift like a bodybuilder and doing some light deads wont do anything but make you stronger.

1. Deadlifts are ill suited for high reps.

2. High reps don't make you stronger. If you're looking for endurance, there are more efficient methods than weight training. Therefore weight training should be used for the one thing it does better than anything else: Increase strength.

Conclusion: Heavy weight/low reps FTW (once you're adapted and technically proficient of course)

Edit: Thumbs up Bomber!!!

johnjamieson
02-22-2008, 05:55 PM
thanks for the good info guys.

Rob Pilger
02-23-2008, 01:44 PM
It cracks me up how everyone thinks that if they lift heavy weights they'll become muscle bound overnight. You have to TRY to get big and bulky, it's not like you do 10 reps of heavy and then the next morning you are a bodybuilder.

Not true, high rep low weight is pretty much useless for boxing.

What you need in boxing is an explosive strength and the best way to develop explosive strength(in other words fast twitch muscles, since some people understand that better) is through low rep high intensity training.

At some point training with medium weight can be added but you have to execute the movement(with medium weight) as quickly and explosively as possible.

Working with low weight your high treshold motoric units are not used and the goal is pretty much is not achieved.

Great points fellas! Weight training, Strength training is meant to develop the qualities you lack, most fighters are bloody WEAK, so develop maximal strength, lifting weights is not meant for light weights high reps. You get plenty of muscle endurance work working the bags, mitts etc. TRUE spp training.

Again, to get fast and explosive, like was mentioned above, you MUST be strong. Maximal strength lays the foundation for other highly sought after qualities such as speed and explosive power.

The only way you will get slow is if you ONLY lift heavy weights. If you combine speed work/plyometric work with strength work, It's impossible to become slow. You could if you perform the plyos wrong by doing them to slow.

Like was mentioned.. Deads are great. Know what your using them for and what strength quality you are developing. Just don't do what others are doing, what are YOUR needs?


Rob Pilger
http://www.boxingperformance.com
http://www.theultimateboxingworkout.com/fighters.html

leff
02-23-2008, 02:03 PM
Compound movements are the only weightlifting you should be doing, IMO, unless you have something specific that is weak -- i.e., severely restricted movement in your shoulder girdle or imbalance between your hamstrings and quads or somesuch -- that is affecting your boxing.

Personally, I only do deadlifts, squats, and cleans. Anything else is just jerking off. Boxing is more like ballet than like football; you don't need rippling biceps or bulging muscles to box well; you need coordination and strength. If you lack coordination and strength, then Olympic-style lifts -- like the deadlift when done correctly -- are an excellent way to help develop them.

Use the Search function for "weights" or "weightlifting" to see the great debate.

i think and i do dips, bench,squats, dealifts,chins and military press.
ill try cleans whan i find someone to teach me the right technic.



btw have you checked your pm box lately?

Count Patron
02-23-2008, 02:50 PM
It cracks me up how everyone thinks that if they lift heavy weights they'll become muscle bound overnight. You have to TRY to get big and bulky, it's not like you do 10 reps of heavy and then the next morning you are a bodybuilder.

Not true, high rep low weight is pretty much useless for boxing.
[B]


Did you even read what I wrote? You just said the same thing I did.

Rob Pilger
02-23-2008, 04:44 PM
No **** those are your words, that's why I pasted them in bold and said great point fellas. I bolded Brooklyn Bombers too, I didn't repeat anything. Why would I?