View Full Version : What Steps do u take to become a Proffesional Boxer


Dynamite Kid
01-12-2008, 07:22 PM
What Steps do u take to become a Proffesional Boxer ? ive recently been to a proffesional gym for the 1st time in my life i did 11/12.... 3 minute round's on the bag's which was very hard i must admit ,i found it a great experince im going back on monday as ive ben suffering some lower back pain that prevented me going on Friday

ive heard that u have to have a brain scan before u can Box as a pro ,anybody got any suggestions

PunchDrunk
01-12-2008, 07:23 PM
Are you kidding?

Dynamite Kid
01-12-2008, 07:30 PM
Are you kidding?

no im not i went to a proffesionaol Gym on Wednesday

bobweaver
01-12-2008, 07:31 PM
what gym was it?

Dynamite Kid
01-12-2008, 07:35 PM
what gym was it?

Ringside Promotions in Birmingham

PunchDrunk
01-12-2008, 08:08 PM
Well, if you expect to become a professional boxer because you went to a gym ONE TIME, then you can forget about it. That is plain ridiculous, hence my asking if you were kidding.

Dynamite Kid
01-12-2008, 08:46 PM
Well, if you expect to become a professional boxer because you went to a gym ONE TIME, then you can forget about it. That is plain ridiculous, hence my asking if you were kidding.

1st proffesional Gym i meant ive Boxed Ameteur

potatoes
01-12-2008, 09:32 PM
If that was a professional gym you went to then somebody in there should be able to give you some professional advice. Men with talent don't usually have to go looking for advice because the advice usually comes looking for them.

Nwahs !!
01-13-2008, 12:28 AM
1st proffesional Gym i meant ive Boxed Ameteur

You have boxed amateur and you are surprised at the difficulty of 11 rounds of bagwork?

PunchDrunk
01-13-2008, 10:03 AM
1st proffesional Gym i meant ive Boxed Ameteur

Liar, liar, pants on fire. :nonono:

msagrain
01-13-2008, 10:13 AM
What Steps do u take to become a Proffesional Boxer ? ive recently been to a proffesional gym for the 1st time in my life i did 11/12.... 3 minute round's on the bag's which was very hard i must admit ,i found it a great experince im going back on monday as ive ben suffering some lower back pain that prevented me going on Friday

ive heard that u have to have a brain scan before u can Box as a pro ,anybody got any suggestions

yeh and them brain scans coast ***163;300 a time

fraidycat
01-13-2008, 12:17 PM
1st proffesional Gym i meant ive Boxed Ameteur

I find it hard to believe, as Nwahs stated above, that you have an amateur record and you are amazed at the difficulty of a few rounds of bag work.

If this is your first time at a "professional" gym -- perhaps by this you mean that you've hit a heavy bag at a friend's house or done backyard sparring or something -- then, my friend, you have a long, long, way to go. There are talented fighters at my gym who have no intention of going pro -- people who have been boxing for 10 years and who have solid records.

Going pro takes a commitment and a dedication that will consume your life, the same as if you wanted to become a concert pianist, a ballet dancer, or president of a bank. You will need to sacrifice and dedicate yourself to it every day of your life -- you will need to make decisions in your life, starting soon, that will put you inexorably down that road to the exclusion of anything else you want to do.

On top of that, Western boxing is the most physically, psychologically, and emotionally brutal organized sport in the world. Not just the fighting; the training in and of itself is excruciating to your body, your mind, and your soul. It will make you question your sanity and your resolve. You will cry. You will bleed. You will puke. You will starve. You will bruise. None of your friends will understand. And the only people who DO understand will be people who beat you up for sport, and are much better at it than you. (Do not underestimate the psychological impact of this, BTW. It ****s with your head when your friends kick your ass for your own good.)

I had a reasonably successful career as a full-time musician for the better part of ten years, and my wife is a world-class soprano who is on a first-name basis with some of the finest musicians in the world. I know what it takes to make a career in an art -- and boxing IS an art, a performing art, as much as a sport -- that allows you to even scratch out a living for yourself.

Can it be done? Yes.

Do I believe you understand what it takes after one evening hitting a heavy bag? No.

But go for it; nothing's stopping you. Give 'em hell.

Nwahs !!
01-13-2008, 03:18 PM
I find it hard to believe, as Nwahs stated above, that you have an amateur record and you are amazed at the difficulty of a few rounds of bag work.

If this is your first time at a "professional" gym -- perhaps by this you mean that you've hit a heavy bag at a friend's house or done backyard sparring or something -- then, my friend, you have a long, long, way to go. There are talented fighters at my gym who have no intention of going pro -- people who have been boxing for 10 years and who have solid records.

Going pro takes a commitment and a dedication that will consume your life, the same as if you wanted to become a concert pianist, a ballet dancer, or president of a bank. You will need to sacrifice and dedicate yourself to it every day of your life -- you will need to make decisions in your life, starting soon, that will put you inexorably down that road to the exclusion of anything else you want to do.

On top of that, Western boxing is the most physically, psychologically, and emotionally brutal organized sport in the world. Not just the fighting; the training in and of itself is excruciating to your body, your mind, and your soul. It will make you question your sanity and your resolve. You will cry. You will bleed. You will puke. You will starve. You will bruise. None of your friends will understand. And the only people who DO understand will be people who beat you up for sport, and are much better at it than you. (Do not underestimate the psychological impact of this, BTW. It ****s with your head when your friends kick your ass for your own good.)

I had a reasonably successful career as a full-time musician for the better part of ten years, and my wife is a world-class soprano who is on a first-name basis with some of the finest musicians in the world. I know what it takes to make a career in an art -- and boxing IS an art, a performing art, as much as a sport -- that allows you to even scratch out a living for yourself.

Can it be done? Yes.

Do I believe you understand what it takes after one evening hitting a heavy bag? No.

But go for it; nothing's stopping you. Give 'em hell.

I puked in the gym on Wednesday. I was pleased.

sterling
01-13-2008, 03:32 PM
I puked in the gym on Wednesday. I was pleased.

lol thats not very gd u shudnet eat before going in the gym rofl no wonder u puked u shud let ur food digest bro.
Yeh as everyone has stated u gta have alot of dedication plus a gd amatuer record for someone to see something in u to take u on as a pro.

twanky1
01-13-2008, 07:43 PM
I find it hard to believe, as Nwahs stated above, that you have an amateur record and you are amazed at the difficulty of a few rounds of bag work.

If this is your first time at a "professional" gym -- perhaps by this you mean that you've hit a heavy bag at a friend's house or done backyard sparring or something -- then, my friend, you have a long, long, way to go. There are talented fighters at my gym who have no intention of going pro -- people who have been boxing for 10 years and who have solid records.

Going pro takes a commitment and a dedication that will consume your life, the same as if you wanted to become a concert pianist, a ballet dancer, or president of a bank. You will need to sacrifice and dedicate yourself to it every day of your life -- you will need to make decisions in your life, starting soon, that will put you inexorably down that road to the exclusion of anything else you want to do.

On top of that, Western boxing is the most physically, psychologically, and emotionally brutal organized sport in the world. Not just the fighting; the training in and of itself is excruciating to your body, your mind, and your soul. It will make you question your sanity and your resolve. You will cry. You will bleed. You will puke. You will starve. You will bruise. None of your friends will understand. And the only people who DO understand will be people who beat you up for sport, and are much better at it than you. (Do not underestimate the psychological impact of this, BTW. It ****s with your head when your friends kick your ass for your own good.)

I had a reasonably successful career as a full-time musician for the better part of ten years, and my wife is a world-class soprano who is on a first-name basis with some of the finest musicians in the world. I know what it takes to make a career in an art -- and boxing IS an art, a performing art, as much as a sport -- that allows you to even scratch out a living for yourself.

Can it be done? Yes.

Do I believe you understand what it takes after one evening hitting a heavy bag? No.

But go for it; nothing's stopping you. Give 'em hell.

Bloody Great post mate.

guzi815
01-13-2008, 08:03 PM
Sign up for the Golden Gloves. See how you do. Compete in some torny's in your area, or even travel to another city. Do you have an Amateur record?? Turning Pro...that seems to be your goal. That's cool. Just get to work. But you gotta put in ALOT of rounds. When you can compete WITHOUT your headgear, get some club fights under your belt. Each state has a set of rules, requirements, etc. Try and get 15 wins in a row, that will land you an appointment for a physical!

Read the Post by "fraidycat". He knows what he's talking about!

aussieboxer2320
01-26-2008, 09:46 PM
so how many am fights have u had then?? im suprised u find a bit of bagwork tough if u have fought as an amateur

Detroit101
01-26-2008, 09:56 PM
I find it hard to believe, as Nwahs stated above, that you have an amateur record and you are amazed at the difficulty of a few rounds of bag work.

If this is your first time at a "professional" gym -- perhaps by this you mean that you've hit a heavy bag at a friend's house or done backyard sparring or something -- then, my friend, you have a long, long, way to go. There are talented fighters at my gym who have no intention of going pro -- people who have been boxing for 10 years and who have solid records.

Going pro takes a commitment and a dedication that will consume your life, the same as if you wanted to become a concert pianist, a ballet dancer, or president of a bank. You will need to sacrifice and dedicate yourself to it every day of your life -- you will need to make decisions in your life, starting soon, that will put you inexorably down that road to the exclusion of anything else you want to do.

On top of that, Western boxing is the most physically, psychologically, and emotionally brutal organized sport in the world. Not just the fighting; the training in and of itself is excruciating to your body, your mind, and your soul. It will make you question your sanity and your resolve. You will cry. You will bleed. You will puke. You will starve. You will bruise. None of your friends will understand. And the only people who DO understand will be people who beat you up for sport, and are much better at it than you. (Do not underestimate the psychological impact of this, BTW. It ****s with your head when your friends kick your ass for your own good.)

I had a reasonably successful career as a full-time musician for the better part of ten years, and my wife is a world-class soprano who is on a first-name basis with some of the finest musicians in the world. I know what it takes to make a career in an art -- and boxing IS an art, a performing art, as much as a sport -- that allows you to even scratch out a living for yourself.

Can it be done? Yes.

Do I believe you understand what it takes after one evening hitting a heavy bag? No.

But go for it; nothing's stopping you. Give 'em hell.

Fraidycat...I see that you are a musician...so am I.....I went to Interlochen on a scholarship for violin when I was younger, and I am a singer songwriter for the last 16 years, currently seeking to solidify a recording contract.....

What type of musician are you?

fraidycat
01-27-2008, 06:44 AM
Fraidycat...I see that you are a musician...so am I.....I went to Interlochen on a scholarship for violin when I was younger, and I am a singer songwriter for the last 16 years, currently seeking to solidify a recording contract.....

What type of musician are you?

Currently I play tenor saxophone in a swing band, and I write jingles for Clearchannel up here in Seattle. I also play the coffeehouse circuit, piano / vox, singer/songwriter stuff. I was signed to Atlantic in '88, then got swept up in the Seattle explosion in the early 90's, and toured the college circuit for several years playing keys with an aggro/prog outfit that went nowhere but took a long, sweet time doing it. It was a lovely ride. No regrets.

Good luck with your deal. Understand that when you sign on the dotted line, the work starts, not ends. Get a good lawyer. Break a leg.

/hijack

Detroit101
01-27-2008, 07:19 PM
Currently I play tenor saxophone in a swing band, and I write jingles for Clearchannel up here in Seattle. I also play the coffeehouse circuit, piano / vox, singer/songwriter stuff. I was signed to Atlantic in '88, then got swept up in the Seattle explosion in the early 90's, and toured the college circuit for several years playing keys with an aggro/prog outfit that went nowhere but took a long, sweet time doing it. It was a lovely ride. No regrets.

Good luck with your deal. Understand that when you sign on the dotted line, the work starts, not ends. Get a good lawyer. Break a leg.

/hijack

You couldnt be more correct about signing on the line....I have screened about 3 lawyers so far and its tough to find a good one...I want someone to take a % of future earnings as opposed to an initial downstroke. It is a shady business....Ive just recently began to do backround music for some reality tv shows on mtv and the e channel...

Do you have your own studio? How is the indy scene in Seattle??

fraidycat
01-27-2008, 10:27 PM
You couldnt be more correct about signing on the line....I have screened about 3 lawyers so far and its tough to find a good one...I want someone to take a % of future earnings as opposed to an initial downstroke. It is a shady business....Ive just recently began to do backround music for some reality tv shows on mtv and the e channel...

Do you have your own studio? How is the indy scene in Seattle??

The indie scene up here is dead. Brandi Carlile is the latest thing to come out of here but she's a fluke. I don't have a studio but I work with many local producers so I have a bank of time I use for projects. Congrats again on the scoring work; that's a tough nut to crack.

BTW, if you need a lawyer, give Michael Blaha a ring in Santa Monica. He's in the book. The guy is a kickass lawyer (former VP of soundtracks for Warner, IIRC) and a cool cat. He negotiates on spec, or used to; if he doesn't anymore, he'd know someone who does. Tell him Joey from Scream Radio says hi.

Detroit101
01-27-2008, 11:47 PM
The indie scene up here is dead. Brandi Carlile is the latest thing to come out of here but she's a fluke. I don't have a studio but I work with many local producers so I have a bank of time I use for projects. Congrats again on the scoring work; that's a tough nut to crack.

BTW, if you need a lawyer, give Michael Blaha a ring in Santa Monica. He's in the book. The guy is a kickass lawyer (former VP of soundtracks for Warner, IIRC) and a cool cat. He negotiates on spec, or used to; if he doesn't anymore, he'd know someone who does. Tell him Joey from Scream Radio says hi.

I think the last music town may be Austin TX, the internet has really changed the indie scene....in a good way though....

I appreciate the reference. I will be sure to give him a call and let him know you said hello...thanks again!

PunchDrunk
01-28-2008, 06:43 AM
"What steps do you take to become a professional musician" :P

CardioMonster
01-28-2008, 08:05 AM
to box professionally in the UK you usually have a promoter and sign a contract for X number of fights. You will usually be assigned a trainer by the promoter, someone he trusts or you might keep your old one.

if you find boxing 12 rounds on a bag difficult you probably dont have the fitness to box 3 rounds in a professional ring. I'd suggest you get some basic level of fitness.

There are a lot of '****' boxers out there who are professional. Being professional doesn`t mean you have talent. Unless you have talent, and you will know yourself if you do, i wouldn`t try and be a pro, because you wont make any money and will take a lot of beatings for not very much money.

You'll wake up one day, you'll be 40, you'll look like **** and have to go and work on a building site at 6am carrying bricks in the pissing rain.

Detroit101
01-28-2008, 09:32 AM
"What steps do you take to become a professional musician" :P

Are you always such a ****y sob???

fraidycat
01-28-2008, 11:57 AM
"What steps do you take to become a professional musician" :P

I must spread some reputation around before giving it to PunchDrunk again.

Damn, that was funny.

fraidycat
01-28-2008, 12:10 PM
BTW, Detroit, this will cost you two points on your deal. Have Mike call me; we'll work it out.

:owned:

j/k. Maybe.

fraidycat
01-28-2008, 12:11 PM
Are you always such a ****y sob???

Yes. He is.

Detroit101
01-28-2008, 12:43 PM
BTW, Detroit, this will cost you two points on your deal. Have Mike call me; we'll work it out.

:owned:

j/k. Maybe.

Lets not put the cart before the horse..lol.. I will...

I do have to say that punch Drunk's dimeanor is pretty consistant!

fraidycat
01-28-2008, 01:12 PM
I do have to say that punch Drunk's dimeanor is pretty consistant!

Yes, but he knows his ****.

PunchDrunk
01-28-2008, 03:10 PM
Lets not put the cart before the horse..lol.. I will...

I do have to say that punch Drunk's dimeanor is pretty consistant!

Haha, that was meant as a lighthearted joke, hence the :P I meant no offence. :)

Detroit101
01-28-2008, 03:31 PM
Haha, that was meant as a lighthearted joke, hence the :P I meant no offence. :)

I know man...I was just messing with you.....It was a low blow..lol

fraidycat
01-28-2008, 04:39 PM
I know man...I was just messing with you.....It was a low blow..lol

You know why hitting below the belt isn't allowed in boxing?

It helps prevent brain damage.